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Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Marling School 11 Plus exam

Located in the Gloucestershire market town of Stroud, Marling School is a boys-only grammar for pupils aged 11-18. Founded in 1887, Marling School became an academy in 2011. Over 800 boys are educated at the school and given the opportunity to participate in a range of extracurricular activities to support their personal development.

 

The school has a reputation for encouraging pupils with musical ability. To learn more about Marling’s music department, watch this video showcasing its 2017 music competition:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Marling School

 

 

Address: Marling School, Cainscross Road, Stroud GL5 4HE

County: Gloucestershire

Admissions Info: admissions@marling.gloucs.sch.uk, 01453 762251

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 846 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: October/April/June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (Gloucestershire)
 

Marling School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Your son must reach the required standard in the 11 Plus exam to be in with a chance of gaining one of Marling School’s 150 Year 7 places. All of Marling’s admissions are coordinated by Gloucestershire County Council. Parents who wish their son to sit the 11+ test must complete the Gloucestershire Grammar Test Registration Form, which can be found on the school’s website, when registration is open.

 

Marling has an average of three applications for every place at Year 7, so in the event of oversubscription, the school will give priority to looked after, or previously looked after children who achieve the required standard. Should there be any ties for places, the admissions authority allocates places at random.

 

To find out more about Marling School’s admissions process, please visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Marling School

 

 

Marling School is one of seven grammar schools in Gloucestershire that use the same 11 Plus test from the Centre of Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM). For your son to be considered for a place at Marling School, you must complete a Common Application Form (CAF) online via the Local Authority and a test registration form, which is available online via the school website. Marling must be stated as one of your preferred school choices on the CAF in order to be considered.

 

Parents will receive results in October and if your son meets the qualifying standard at 11+, you can apply for a Year 7 place at Marling School.

 

Marling School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Since 2013, Marling School has used the CEM 11 Plus exam by the University of Durham. The test consists of two multiple-choice papers that cover the following subjects:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning (including English)
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Numerical Reasoning (Maths)

 

Both tests are taken on the same day and each last 45-50 minutes.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Marling School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

If your son is worried about sitting his 11 Plus exam, the best way to help him is to prepare a thorough revision timetable. For your son to have the best chance of securing one of Marling School’s 150 Year 7 places, he must invest time into studying for the tests. Keep him motivated with fun revision games to suit his preferred style of learning and he’ll soon adapt to any additional revision that’s required.

 

Practice exam papers are an effective revision technique for the Marling School 11 Plus. The earlier you start with practice papers, the sooner you will be aware of any weaker subject areas. The papers will not only familiarise your son with the layout of the exam but will help to improve his time management skills.

 

For the Marling School 11+ exam, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Marling School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Loreto Grammar School website

Founded in 1909, Loreto Grammar School is an all-girls Catholic grammar based in Altrincham, Trafford. It became an academy in 2012 and currently teaches over 1,000 girls. The school prides itself on its international links, with over 120 Loreto schools worldwide and sister schools in India, Australia and Spain.

 

Loreto Grammar School provides its pupils with an education to help shape their faith, while aiming to encourage them to seek leadership roles after their education is complete.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Loreto Grammar School

 

 

Address: Loreto Grammar School, Dunham Road, Altrincham WA14 4AH

County: Greater Manchester (Altrincham)

Admissions Info: admissions@loretogrammar.co.uk, 0161 928 3703

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,051 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

 

Loreto Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

There are currently 150 places allocated to Year 7 pupils at Loreto Grammar School. Each of these places are awarded based on performance in the 11 Plus exam.

A school rooted in tradition, it encourages prospective students and their parents to attend its open day in July, to learn more about the admissions process, take a tour of the school and ensure that it is the right environment for your daughter’s next stage of education.

 

Applications must be made online and late applications will not be considered. Loreto Grammar is a popular school and competition for entry is high. Should there be more applicants than available places in Year 7, Loreto uses its oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  1. Baptised, Roman Catholic, looked-after girls and previously looked-after girls
  2. Baptised, Roman Catholic girls who have sisters in the school at the time of admission
  3. Baptised, Roman Catholic girls who attend an associated Primary School and live in a nominated Local Pastoral Area
  4. Other Baptised Roman Catholic girls
  5. Other looked-after girls and previously looked-after girls
  6. Baptised girls of other denominations
  7. Other girls

 

For more information about Loreto Grammar School’s admission process, please consult the school website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Loreto Grammar School

 

 

Parents of students who wish to register their daughter to sit the entrance tests must do so with the school before the exam date. Once registration is open, the relevant form can be completed online via the school’s website. Parents must supply their daughter’s baptism certificate in order to complete the registration process. Late applications will not be considered.

 

Parents must include Loreto as a preferred choice on their Local Authority’s Common Application Form (CAF) in order for their daughter to be eligible for a Year 7 place at the school.

 

 

Loreto Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Prospective pupils to Loreto Grammar School must sit three tests at 11+:

 

  • Maths – this paper is written and set by the school and lasts approximately 45 minutes. Its structure can be considered similar to that of a SATs paper.
  • Verbal Reasoning – this paper is set by GL Assessment, is multiple-choice and lasts 50 minutes.
  • English – this paper is also set by GL Assessment, is multiple-choice and lasts 45 minutes.

 

Parents will be notified of the test results in October, which will indicate whether the student has attained the required score to be eligible for admission. However, place allocations will not be made public until March the following year and passing the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of entry to the school.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Loreto Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

When it comes to the 11 Plus exam, regular practice is key. To give your daughter the best chance of performing well and gaining a place at Loreto, they should incorporate practice papers into their study. Regular exposure to these types of papers could increase your daughter’s chance of achieving the required score in the 11 Plus.

 

It’s important to identify gaps in your daughter’s knowledge quickly; the sooner you recognise where additional work is needed, the less chance there is of her feeling overworked as the exam date approaches. Allocate any additional time to these gaps via a study plan and focus on the best revision techniques that work for your daughter’s learning style.

 

Encourage your daughter to sit practice papers under timed conditions, as this will vastly improve her time management skills and get her used to answering all required questions within the timeframe.

 

For the Loreto Grammar School 11+, we would specifically recommend the following resources for your daughter:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 3 (GL)

 

11+ English Pack 1 (GL)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL)

11+ English Pack 3 (GL)

11+ English: Spelling

 

11+ Mathematics: Problem Solving (GL)

11+ Mathematics: Pack 1 (GL)

11+ Mathematics: Pack 2 (GL)

11+ Mathematics: Pack 3 (GL)

 

 

The information provided about Loreto Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Maidstone Grammar School for Girls website

Founded in 1887, Maidstone Grammar School for Girls (known as MGGS), is a selective girls’ grammar, with boys allocated places in the school’s sixth form. The school originally opened with just 18 pupils and today educates 1,200 students.

 

Pupils are split into six houses: Britons, Danes, Normans, Romans, Saxons and Vikings, and compete in various annual competitions in an effort to win the house cup.

 

For an insight into academic life at Maidstone Grammar School for Girls, watch this short promotional video from 2011:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Maidstone Grammar School for Girls

 

 

Address: Maidstone Grammar School for Girls, Buckland Road, Maidstone ME16 0SF

County: Kent

Admissions Info: central@mggs.org, 01622 752 103

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,217 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: October/June/July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test (GL)

 

 

Maidstone Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

To be eligible for a Year 7 place at Maidstone Grammar School for Girls, pupils must sit the Kent 11 Plus Test. The test exists to assess whether a grammar school education is the right option for your daughter.

 

With 180 Year 7 places available, competition for entry is high. In the case of over-subscription, the school uses the following criteria, giving priority to:

  1. Children in Local Authority Care
  2. Current Family Association (a sibling attending the school when the child starts)
  3. Health and Special Access Reasons
  4. Proximity of child’s home to school

 

For more information on Maidstone Grammar School’s admission criteria, please visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Maidstone Grammar School for Girls

 

 

To apply for Year 7 entry to MGGS, parents must register online with Kent Local Authority (LA).

 

Once your daughter has sat the Kent Test at 11+, parents must complete the Secondary Common Application Form and submit it to Kent County Council – this can usually be done online. The Council will send assessment decisions to parents in October and offers will be sent out on National Offer Day in March the following year.

 

If you have any further queries about Maidstone Grammar School for Girls’ admissions process, email the school central@mggs.org or call 01622 752 103.

 

 

Maidstone Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Maidstone Grammar School for Girls requires pupils to take the Kent 11 Plus exam, which consists of two multiple-choice tests. The first test is one-hour long and is split into two sections, English and maths. Each section has a 5-minute practice exercise and a 25-minute test.

 

The second test is a reasoning paper and is split into three sections:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Spatial Reasoning

 

This 60-minute test is broken up into smaller sections.

 

Prospective pupils will also be required to sit a 40-minute writing task. This is not marked as part of the 11 Plus exam, but it may be used in grammar school appeal cases.

 

The Kent 11 Plus Exam: How to Prepare Your Child for Success

 

How to Prepare for the Maidstone Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

While the Kent Test varies from year to year, all children will benefit from good preparation for their 11 Plus exam. Whatever your child’s current level, they will need to invest additional time for revision. For the Maidstone Grammar School for Girls’ 11+ test, we would recommend using practice exam papers as part of that revision. Practice papers give your daughter a clearer idea of the types of questions she can expect in the real exam and they will quickly highlight any subject areas that need additional focus.

 

Gaining a Year 7 place at a Kent-based grammar school can be difficult, but with the right preparation, your daughter needn’t be worried about her 11 Plus. We have designed three practice tests specifically for the Kent Test:

 

 

You may wish to also integrate subject-specific practice using the resource packs below:

 

 

 

 

The information provided about Maidstone Grammar School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Maidstone Grammar School website

Maidstone Grammar School was originally founded in 1549 to teach Latin grammar to the children of Maidstone. Now, it is a boys’ grammar school that teaches over 1,200 pupils, with girls admitted into the school’s sixth form.

 

The school has won both a Language College award and a Healthy School award and, in 2011, the school introduced an Applied Learning Centre, allowing pupils access to facilities such as editing suites.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Maidstone Grammar School

 

 

Address: Maidstone Grammar School, Barton Road, Maidstone ME15 7BT

County: Kent

Admissions Info: school@mgs-kent.org.uk, 01622 752101

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,276 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 205

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

 

Maidstone Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

To be considered for a Year 7 place at Maidstone Grammar School, pupils must sit the Kent 11 Plus Test.

 

With 205 Year 7 places available at Maidstone, competition for entry is high. In cases where there are more applicants than available places, the school uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  1. Qualifying pupils who are looked-after or previously looked-after children
  2. Children resident in one of the parishes listed here, achieving at least a mark halfway between the pass mark and the maximum marks available in the Kent Test
  3. Other qualifying children resident in one of the listed parishes
  4. Qualifying children who have siblings at the school, and those who live within the closest proximity to the school

 

Parents of students who are not awarded a grammar school place at Maidstone have a right to appeal, and in the first instance, must write to The Clerk to the Governors, care of the school.

 

For more information about Maidstone Grammar School’s admissions process, visit the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Maidstone Grammar School

 

 

Parents who wish to register their son to sit the entrance tests must register with the school before the exam date. To register for the Kent Test at 11+, you must complete an online registration form.

 

Once your son has sat the Kent Test at 11+, parents must complete the Secondary Common Application Form and submit it to Kent County Council. This process can usually be done online. Parents will receive the results of the exam via the Council in October and Year 7 place offers will be sent out in March the following year.

 

 

Maidstone Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Most Kent-based selective schools require pupils to sit the Kent 11 Plus exam; this Kent Test consists of two multiple-choice papers:

 

Paper 1: This is an hour-long exam, split into two sections that cover English and maths. Each section has a 5-minute practice exercise and a 25-minute test.

 

Paper 2: This is a 60-minute test, focusing on reasoning and is split into three sections:

 

  • Verbal reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning
  • Spatial reasoning

 

Pupils must also complete a 40-minute writing task, which might be referred to during borderline or appeal cases.

 

If your son is going to sit the Kent Test, read our article on how to prepare him for the exam, including some sample questions.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Maidstone Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

As Kent is the largest and most competitive grammar school area in England, it’s imperative to make the most of the time and resources available to your son in the lead-up to the Kent Test if he is going to secure a Year 7 place at Maidstone Grammar School.

 

Your son must be thoroughly prepared and know what to expect from the exam structure and content. One of the most effective ways of improving your son’s performance in the exam is to use practice papers. These papers are a good way of highlighting weaker areas quickly, so introduce them early in your child’s revision for the 11 Plus.

 

To help your son gain a Year 7 place at Maidstone Grammar School, we have created and extensively tested three practice tests specifically for the Kent Test:

 

Also, if your son needs additional practice ahead of his 11+, try a selection of our subject-specific practice exam papers below:

 

 

 

 

The information provided about Maidstone Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of The Latymer School 11 Plus exam

Based in Edmonton, Greater London, The Latymer School is a selective, co-educational grammar. Founded in 1624, it is the only grammar school in Enfield and currently teaches over 1,300 pupils aged 11-18. In recent years, The Latymer School has featured near the top of league tables and is considered one of the UK’s best state schools.

 

Pupils are split across six houses that compete with each other throughout the school year in a variety of competitions including drama, arts and sport. The winning house lays claim to the house trophy, the Dormer Shield.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for The Latymer School

 

 

Address: Latymer School, Haselbury Road, London N9 9TN

County: Hertfordshire/London Borough of Enfield

Admissions Info: office@latymer.co.uk, 0208 807 4037

School Type: Co-Educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,369

Number of Places in Year 7: 186

Open Day Date: June

Exam Dates: July (Round One) and September (Round Two)

Exam Board Type: Part One: GL Assessment / Part Two: set by the school

 

 

The Latymer School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to The Latymer School for Year 7 is by academic selection, following an 11 Plus exam. The school receives over 10 applications for every Year 7 place. Parents and prospective students are encouraged to attend one of the school’s tours to ensure that Latymer is a good fit for the pupil before applying for a place.

 

In the likely event that there are more applicants than available places in Year 7, the school uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  1. Pupils with an Education Health & Care Plan
  2. A looked after child or previously looked after child
  3. A maximum of 20 applicants from the ‘Inner Area’ who show exceptional musical talent
  4. Students from the ‘inner area’ (maximum of 20) who are eligible for Pupil Premium.

 

Explanation of the ‘Inner Area’ and more details about the oversubscription criteria can be found here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to The Latymer School

 

 

In order to apply for a place at Latymer, parents are required to complete and return the school’s online registration form as well as the local authority common application form (CAF).

 

Parents should take note of the school and local authority’s application dates, as late applications will not be accepted. If parents do not complete the school’s entry form on time, their child will not be able to take the entrance exam.

 

 

The Latymer School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Latymer School 11+ test consists of two parts:

 

  • Part One: Mathematics and Verbal Reasoning. All applicants will be invited to take this test, which is multiple-choice and with each paper lasting for approximately 50 minutes.  This test will take place in July.

 

Following part one, only the top 650 ranked candidates in the tests will be invited to sit part two, a written English test.

 

  • Part Two: The English test is split into two sections. Section one lasts 30 minutes and will consist of a reading comprehension. Section two also lasts 30 minutes and will be a written paper, requiring pupils to tell a story and show a good level of writing skill. This test will take place in September.

 

How to Prepare for The Latymer School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

As a top-performing UK grammar school, competition for Year 7 places at The Latymer School is incredibly strong. The school is looking for academic talent and has set a two-part 11+ exam to ensure candidates are challenged and examined rigorously. With a good 11 Plus study plan, your child should be able to rise to that challenge and approach the exam calmly and confidently.

 

To prepare for The Latymer School 11+, make sure your child works on their Verbal Reasoning skills and read our 11 Plus guide to maths. Whatever your child’s current attainment, they can significantly improve by using practice exam papers. Any prior practice of the skills tested in the Latymer entrance exam will be of huge advantage to your child, so review the 11+ practice papers available.

 

We have an array of practice papers specifically designed to help your child  build their confidence ahead of the Latymer School 11 Plus exam, in particular we would recommend:

 

Part 1

 

11+ GL-style Mathematics Pack 1 

11+ GL-style Mathematics Pack 2

11+ GL-style Problem Solving

11+ GL-style Verbal Reasoning Pack 1

11+ GL-style Verbal Reasoning Pack 2

 

Part 2

 

11+ Spelling

11+ English (Open Answer) Pack 1

11+ English (Open Answer) Pack 2

 

The information provided about The Latymer School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Lawrence Sheriff School website

Founded in 1878, Lawrence Sheriff School (LSS) is a boys-only grammar located in Rugby, Warwickshire. In 2014, LSS became an academy and currently educates over 800 boys from the ages of 11-18.

 

The school has seen substantial investment in recent years to improve its facilities. It is now home to new rugby pitches and also has a regional and local table tennis centre on campus.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Lawrence Sheriff School

 

 

Address: Lawrence Sheriff School, Clifton Road, Rugby CV21 3AG

County: Warwickshire

Admissions Info: lss@lawrencesheriffschool.com, 01788 542074

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 896

Number of Places in Year 7: approximately 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

Lawrence Sheriff School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

All 120 Year 7 LSS places will be allocated based on pupil performance in the 11+ exam. Before applying for a place, it is suggested that parents visit the school during its June open day. Here, parents will be able to ask questions about the admissions process and prospective pupils can learn more about the school and its learning environment.

 

Lawrence Sheriff School tends to be oversubscribed for Year 7 places, and uses the following criteria to determine priority:

 

  1. Looked after children or previously looked after children
  2. Children in receipt of the Pupil Premium (limited to 10 places)
  3. Children living in the Eastern Area of Warwickshire, who achieve the Automatic Qualifying Score or above (limited to 55 places)
  4. Children living in the priority circle (the centre of which is the Rugby Water Tower and has a radius of 10.004 miles – this also includes the Eastern Area) who achieve the Automatic Qualifying Score or above (limited to 55 places)
  5. Other children living inside or outside of the priority areas who achieve the Automatic Qualifying Score or above

 

For further information about Lawrence Sheriff School’s admission process, visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Lawrence Sheriff School

 

 

The admissions service at Warwickshire County Council coordinates all Year 7 entry to Lawrence Sheriff School. This service operates the same entrance test procedure as The Grammar Schools in Birmingham Consortium.

 

To apply for entry to the school, parents must register their son for the school’s entrance examination by completing the Common Application Form (CAF). The school’s admissions policy states that late 11+ registrations will not be considered in the first round of offers.

 

Parents will be notified of results via post from mid-October and the first round of place allocations will be available from the beginning of March.

 

 

Lawrence Sheriff School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Lawrence Sheriff School 11 Plus exam consists of two papers that each last 45 minutes. Both are made-up of a mix of standard format and multiple choice questions, covering:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Numeracy

 

Parents should be aware that the Verbal Reasoning exam has an English component, which includes a comprehension and cloze test. The Maths exam consists of a numeracy test, which focuses on mental arithmetic and problem-solving.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Lawrence Sheriff School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

For your son to have the best possible chance of gaining a Year 7 place at Warwickshire’s Lawrence Sheriff School, he must be willing to invest additional time in revision on top of his usual school work routine. The good news is that most children respond better to short bursts of revision, so just 20 minutes a day can make a real difference to your son’s knowledge and ability to prepare for the exam.

 

One of the best ways of highlighting any knowledge gaps quickly is to use practice exam papers with your son. These 11+ papers come complete with answers, enabling you to accurately measure your child’s performance and track their improvements. If your son is in the process of preparing for the Lawrence Sheriff School, we have several 11 Plus practice papers that are specifically designed to help him:

 

 

The information provided about Lawrence Sheriff School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Langley Grammar School website

Located in Slough, Berkshire, Langley Grammar School is a co-educational grammar that gained academy status in 2011. Langley Grammar was first established in 1956 and now teaches over 1,000 pupils aged 11-18.

 

Langley Grammar considers itself to be an innovative school that not only provides its pupils with a good academic grounding, but also one that gives focus to the skills needed for navigating the modern world. The school gives pupils the opportunity to partake in a variety of extracurricular activities such as sport, music and drama.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Langley Grammar School

 

 

Address: Langley Grammar School, Reddington Drive, Langley SL3 7QS

County: Berkshire

Admissions Info: school@lgs.slough.sch.uk, 01753 598300

School Type: Co-Educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,045 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 180

Open Day Date: May and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

 

Langley Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

There are currently 180 Year 7 places available at Langley Grammar School, with all places determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. As per other grammar schools within the Slough area, Langley hosts a parents-only information evening in May. This event is not suitable for children and no tours of the school will be given. Rather, the event aims to give parents a detailed explanation of the school’s admission process. Children are permitted to attend the school’s open evening in September.

 

Year 7 admissions to Langley Grammar School are coordinated through the Slough Consortium of Grammar Schools and parents must register online ahead of their child’s 11+ exam date.

 

For a full breakdown of Langley’s oversubscription criteria or more information about the school’s admissions process, visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Langley Grammar School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Langley Grammar School, parents must register their child with the Slough Consortium. Next, parents must complete a Common Application Form (CAF), which can be done online via Slough County Council.

 

As Langley Grammar School follows Slough Consortium’s schedule for Year 7 place allocation, parents are advised to consult this key dates document to ensure your child is registered in time for the 11 Plus exam.

 

 

Langley Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Langley Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of two papers, each lasting approximately 60-65 minutes. All four schools within the Slough Consortium use the same test papers, which test children’s Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Numerical Reasoning skills.

 

Parents will receive online results of their child’s 11+ exam in October, before the deadline for submission of the CAF and final place allocations will be published in March.

 

How to Prepare for the Langley Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Sitting a formal exam will likely cause a child to feel nervous, but if a solid study plan is put in place early on, it’s possible to keep levels of anxiety to a minimum.

Ensure that your child is studying regularly – just 20 minutes every day can really make a difference to their understanding of the required subjects.

 

Introduce practice exam papers into your child’s study routine early on and when appropriate for your child, take these practice papers under timed conditions. Creating a ‘mock exam’ environment will be excellent practice for the actual exam.

 

To help your child to prepare for the Langley Grammar School 11+ exam, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

11+ CEM Short Numerical Reasoning

11+ CEM Verbal Reasoning

11+ CEM Comprehension

11+ CEM Cloze

11+ CEM Spelling

 

If your child’s 11+ is looming and the study plan hasn’t gone as well as you’d hoped, don’t worry; read our guide to last minute preparation for the 11 Plus exam.

 

The information provided about Langley Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Lancaster Royal Grammar School website

Founded in 1235, Lancaster Royal Grammar School (LRGS) is a boys-only grammar located in the Lancashire city of Lancaster. Teaching over 1,000 boys aged 11-18, in 2011, LRGS became an academy. One of the UK’s state boarding schools, LRGS is known for its academic and sporting successes.

 

For an overview of the school’s sporting activities, take a look at this short collection of clips from LRGS’s sports day:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Lancaster Royal Grammar School

 

 

Address: Lancaster Royal Grammar School, East Road, Lancaster LA1 3EF

County: Lancashire

Admissions Info: esimmill@lrgs.org.uk, 01524 580629

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,046 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150 (plus 24 boarding)

Open Day Date: June and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

 

Lancaster Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Lancaster Royal Grammar School has 150 day places available in Year 7. Admission to the school at this stage is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. The school hosts an open day in June and an information evening for parents in September. At the information evening, parents can learn more about the school’s values, meet the staff and find out more about the Year 7 admission process.

 

The school welcomes boys from within the Lancaster catchment area, and from further afield – especially if they are considering a boarding place. However, the school prioritises students that are, or have been in Looked After care within the City of Lancaster.

 

For more information about Lancaster Royal Grammar School’s 11+ admissions criteria visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Lancaster Royal Grammar School

 

 

Lancaster Royal Grammar School is very clear about its 11 Plus application process. Parents must complete two application forms:

 

  1. The LRGS application form, which can be completed online
  2. The Local Authority (LA) application form – depending on where you live, this can be found via an online search for your LA

 

LRGS only accepts late applications with good reason.

 

Parents will receive notification of their child’s 11+ results in October and Lancashire LA will publish allocation places in March of the following year.

 

 

Lancaster Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus exam for Lancaster Royal Grammar School consists of three multiple-choice papers and are based on the KS2 syllabus:

 

  • English – this 45-minute paper consists of 56 questions, including two passages with various questions to test pupils’ spelling, punctuation and grammar
  • Mathematics – a 50-minute paper consisting of 50 questions
  • Verbal Reasoning – a 50-minute test with 80 questions

 

 

How to Prepare for the Lancaster Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

For your son to gain a Year 7 place at Lancaster Royal Grammar School, he must be willing to invest time in revision and preparation. Our 11 Plus guide for parents is an excellent starting point, as it will give you an overview of what the exam could contain.

 

Year 7 places at LRGS are competitive, so give your son a head start with early exam practice. The earlier you start revision, the more opportunities you will have to work on your son’s weaker subjects.

 

Practice test papers are an ideal way of preparing your child for the 11 Plus exam at LRGS. The papers are proven to be an effective way of familiarising students with the layout of the exam and will also help them to improve their time management skills.

 

For the Lancaster Royal Grammar School 11 Plus exam, we specifically recommend the following resources that use the same style and question types as the actual 11+ exam:

 

11+ English Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 3(GL-style)

11+ English: Spelling

 

11+ Mathematics Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics: Problem Solving (GL-style)

 

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

 

The information provided about Lancaster Royal Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Lancaster Girls' Grammar School website

Founded in 1907, Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School (LGGS) is a selective grammar that teaches approximately 900 girls aged 11-18. Now an academy, LGGS has been both a Technology College and a Language College.

 

LGGS consistently performs well in school league tables and has an excellent reputation for promoting high academic achievement, whilst maintaining a relaxed atmosphere. The school’s four houses are named after towns twinned with Lancaster: Aalbord, Lublin, Perpignan and Rendsburg.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School

 

 

Address: Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School, Regent Street, Lancaster LA1 1SF

County: Lancashire

Admissions Info: lggs@lggs.lancs.sch.uk, 01524 581661

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 904 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 140

Open Evening Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Lancashire GL Assessment 11 Plus

 

Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Year 7 admission to Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School is solely determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. There are currently 140 places allocated to Year 7 students, although this figure can vary slightly year-to-year. In June, LGGS hosts an open evening for parents and prospective pupils, where you can meet the Headteacher and learn more about the school’s admission process.

 

The school deals with its Year 7 admissions directly. In cases where there are more applicants than available places in Year 7, the school uses its oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  1. Children who permanently live within the city of Lancaster at the time of application and are looked after children, or previously looked after children.
  2. Children who permanently live within the city of Lancaster at the time of application and who are eligible for the Pupil Premium.
  3. Children who permanently live within the city of Lancaster.
  4. All other applicants who live outside of the city of Lancaster who achieve the required standard.

 

Read the school’s admissions booklet for more information about its admissions process.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School

 

 

Parents who wish to register their daughter to sit the Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11+ should do so before the exam date. The registration form can be downloaded via the school’s website.

 

Parents must complete their Local Authority’s Common Application Form (CAF) to ensure their daughter is considered for a Year 7 place. Children will sit the exam in September and parents will receive results in October.

 

Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11 Plus exam is set by GL Assessment. Girls must sit three multiple-choice tests that cover:

 

  • Mathematics – this test runs for 50-minutes and consists of 50 questions
  • Verbal Reasoning – this test is 50-minutes long and consists of 80 questions
  • English – this test is 45-minutes long and consists of 56 questions

 

All questions contained within these exams are based on the Key Stage 2 curriculum.

 

How to Prepare for the Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

As Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School consistently features in the top 20 secondary schools in the UK, it’s little surprise that it is a very popular choice with parents. To maximise your daughter’s chances of success in the LGGS 11 Plus exam, you need to be organised. For an overview of the exam, have a read of our 11 Plus guide for parents, which will give you a better understanding of what your daughter can expect from the tests.

 

If your daughter’s progress has plateaued, or you’ve noticed knowledge gaps in her learning, try practice test papers. They’re a great way of preparing your child for the 11 Plus exam at LGGS because they help familiarise students with the layout of the tests and can help improve time management.

 

For the Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School 11+ exam, we would specifically recommend:

 

 

The information provided about Lancaster Girls’ Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Shakespeare’s School exam

Located in Warwickshire’s market town of Stratford-upon-Avon, King Edward VI School (K.E.S) is a boys’ grammar, with girls attending its sixth form since 2013. Known as ‘Shakespeare’s School’, it’s believed that William Shakespeare attended the facility, although there there’s little supporting evidence. K.E.S became an academy in 2011 and currently teaches over 500 pupils.

 

Pupils participate in a variety of extracurricular activities, with notable emphasis placed on sports, including rugby, fencing and rowing.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI School

 

 

Address: King Edward VI School, Church Street, Stratford-upon-Avon CV37 6HB

County: Warwickshire

Admissions Info: office@kes.net, 01789 293351

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 558 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 87

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Warwickshire CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

King Edward VI School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

With just 87 places available, parents are firmly encouraged to ensure that K.E.S is the right educational environment for their son before applying. By attending the school’s open day in June, both parents and prospective pupils will have the opportunity to see the school grounds and meet members of staff.

 

Should there be more applications than available places in Year 7, the school applies its oversubscription criteria, outlined here, in order of priority.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI School

 

 

Warwickshire Admissions is responsible for Year 7 entry to King Edward VI School. To apply, parents must register their son for the school’s entrance examination by completing the Common Application Form (CAF). The school’s admissions policy states that late 11+ registrations will not be considered in the first round of offers. In addition to registering for the exam, Warwickshire Admissions require evidence of the child’s home address.

 

Parents will be notified of results via post from mid-October and the first round of place allocations will be available from the beginning of March.

 

 

King Edward VI School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The King Edward VI School 11 Plus exam consists of two papers that last for approximately 50 minutes each. They contain a mix of standard format and multiple choice questions, covering the following subjects:

The Verbal Reasoning exam includes an English component, which consists of a comprehension and cloze test. The maths exam involves a numeracy test, which tests for ability in mental arithmetic and problem-solving questions. Each answer sheet is marked electronically for accuracy.

 

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

King Edward VI School is consistently oversubscribed in Year 7, so your son should follow a good 11 Plus study plan in order to increase his chances of gaining one of the school’s 87 places.

 

Practice exam papers are a great way to get your son used to the format of the K.E.S 11 Plus and improve his time management skills ahead of the tests. Prior practice of the skills tested in the entrance exam will be of a huge advantage to your son.

 

Our practice papers come complete with answers, enabling you to accurately measure your child’s performance and track their progress in the lead-up to the exam. We have several 11 Plus practice papers that can help your child prepare for entry to King Edward VI School.

 

We would specifically recommend the following resources for the Warwickshire 11 plus:

 

The information provided about King Edward VI School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Handsworth School website

Founded in 1883, King Edward VI Handsworth School is a girls-only selective grammar located in Birmingham. Part of the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI, over 900 girls currently attend the school and it is considered one of the top state schools in the UK.

 

King Edward VI Handsworth offers pupils a broad curriculum and although it has a rich history, it nevertheless considers itself to be a forward-thinking and modern teaching facility.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Handsworth School

 

 

Address: King Edward VI Handsworth School, Rose Hill Road, B21 9AR

County: Birmingham, West Midlands

Admissions Info: office@kingedwardvi.bham.sch.uk, 0121 554 2342

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 912 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 160

Open Day Date: June / September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

King Edward VI Handsworth School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

King Edward VI Hansdworth School for Girls follows the admission criteria of the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium, along with seven other grammar schools in the area. Only pupils who reach the required standard via the 11+ entrance exam will be considered for entry.

 

The Consortium requires that students are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the CEM 11 Plus exam. Pupils must attain the minimum ‘qualifying score’ to be eligible for admission. However, attaining the qualifying score does not guarantee your daughter a place as the school only has 160 Year 7 places.

 

If test results are equal, priority will be given to:

 

  1. Looked after children and previously looked after children who achieve the qualifying score
  2. Children registered for Pupil Premium who achieve the qualifying score (limited to 32 places)
  3. Children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Handsworth School

 

 

In order to apply for a place at the school, parents must register their daughter with the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium using the online application form. Parents must also complete a Local Authority Preference form for their daughter to be considered for a grammar school place in Birmingham.

 

11 Plus test results will be released in October, with official places allocated in the following March.

 

 

King Edward VI Handsworth School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

All eight grammar schools across Birmingham sit the same 11 Plus exam, including prospective pupils at King Edward VI Handsworth School. The exam consists of two papers, which both last approximately 50 minutes, with additional time for instructions. The two papers are split into sections that cover the following topics:

 

 

The majority of the questions in these papers are multiple-choice and children will be provided with a separate answer sheet.

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Handsworth School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

If King Edward VI Handsworth School is your daughter’s first choice school at Year 7, you must ensure that she has all the necessary resources to perform well in the 11 Plus exam. Competition for its 160 places at this stage is fierce so it’s important to set a revision timetable with your daughter that covers all the required subjects. A timetable can also help ensure that your daughter covers everything she’ll need to know for the exam, without being overworked.

 

To be in with a good chance of gaining a Year 7 place at King Edward VI Handsworth School, we’d suggest using practice exam papers; they are a proven method of helping revision at 11 Plus level.

 

We would specifically recommend the following practice resources for the King Edward VI Handsworth School 11+ exam:

 

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Handsworth School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth website

King Edward VI Grammar School (KEVIGS), Louth is a co-educational facility established in 1276. Originally a boys’ school, girls have attended since 1965 when the local girls’ school joined with KEVIGS.

 

Located in the Lincolnshire market town of Louth, KEVIGS teaches approximately 800 pupils aged 11-18, and became an academy in 2015.

 

For an insight into the school’s extracurricular activities, watch this short promotional video showcasing its sports day:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth

 

 

Address: King Edward VI Grammar School, Edward Street, Louth LN11 9LL

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: rhona.adam@kevigs.lincs.sch.uk, 01507 600456

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 795

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

 

King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to KEVIGS in Year 7 is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. There are currently 120 places allocated to Year 7 students. The school strongly encourages prospective students and their parents to attend one of their open evenings. Parents can also arrange individual tours.

 

KEVIGS is a member of the Lincolnshire Consortium of Grammar Schools and the Local Authority co-ordinates the school’s admissions at Year 7.

 

With 120 places available, should KEVIGS be oversubscribed, the following oversubscription criteria are used, giving priority to:

 

  1. Looked after children, or previously looked after children
  2. The siblings of children who will still be attending King Edward VI when the child is due to start
  3. Eligible children in Year 6 who live within the traditional catchment area
  4. Candidates with the highest test scores

 

If you have more questions about KEVIGS’s admission process at Year 7, visit the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth

 

 

Parents must download and complete a registration form from the school’s website in the first instance. Once a child has sat the 11+ in September, results will be sent to parents by the LA in October. Parents living in Lincolnshire should complete a Common Application Form (CAF) directly via the LA website. Failure to do so will mean your child will not be considered for a grammar school place in Lincolnshire. Parents are advised by the school to place King Edward’s as their number one preference on the CAF to maximise their child’s chances of gaining a place in Year 7.

 

King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth  11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Prospective pupils to King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth must sit two 11+ tests on two separate dates. These exams are multiple-choice and students will be tested on:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning – this 50-minute test is made-up of 80 questions. Questions are divided into 15 or more sections, with 5/6 questions in each section.
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning – this 40-minute test is made-up of 70 questions and is split into five sections. Questions must be answered one section at a time, with seven minutes allocated for each section. Pupils cannot move onto the next section until they are told to do so.

 

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

While it’s understandable that some children worry about sitting their 11+, the reality is that with a good revision timetable and plenty of practice, there shouldn’t be anything to be concerned about. King Edward VI Grammar School in Louth is consistently oversubscribed for Year 7 places, so it’s important to allow your child plenty of time to revise for the 11 Plus exam. Regular revision will highlight any knowledge gaps early on and will also improve your child’s confidence.

 

The King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth 11 Plus focuses on your child’s reasoning skills, so take a look at these articles to help prepare them:

 

 

Have you considered practice exam papers? These should be introduced into your child’s revision timetable early on. Your child will need excellent time management skills to complete the 11+ GL Assessment and practice papers can help with this.

 

The 11+ practice papers below cover all the required question types that your child will face in the King Edward VI Grammar School exam. Designed to challenge your child, once the test is complete, you will receive scored feedback immediately. If your child is set to sit the KEVIGS in Year 6, we would fully recommend the following practice papers:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL)

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL)

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Grammar School, Louth was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Photo of a pen and notepad on a desk

KS2 SATs Maths tests your child’s understanding of numbers and mathematical problem-solving. But for some children, this knowledge doesn’t come easily and this can lead to anxiety that can impact their final SATs score. In this article, we share everything you need to know about the KS2 SATs Maths test, including what to focus your child’s revision sessions on and how to prepare for the exam itself.

 

KS2 Maths: Understanding the Test

 

 

Towards the end of Year 6, all children in the UK sit a Key Stage 2 Maths SATs exam. There are three test papers in total, consisting of:

  • Paper 1 – arithmetic (30 minutes)

This arithmetic paper is made up of around 36 number-focused questions, that challenge pupils to use addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. In this paper, children will be required to use percentages, fractions and decimals.

  • Paper 2 – reasoning (40 minutes)
  • Paper 3 – reasoning (40 minutes)

Both of these reasoning papers consist of around 20 problem-solving questions, in which children must show solid mathematical knowledge by solving various problems and puzzles.

 

 

KS2 SATs Maths: Areas to Focus On

Photo of a numeracy text paper

 

For your child to perform well in the Maths SATs at KS2, they are required to understand a variety of mathematical topics. Although not an exhaustive list, below are some of the topics your child could be tested on during the exam:

 

  • Addition and Subtraction
  • Algebra
  • Fractions, Decimals and Percentages
  • Fractions – equivalent, adding, subtracting, improper and mixed
  • Geometry – properties of shapes and position and movement
  • Measurement – metric units, area, perimeter
  • Measurement – time and roman numerals
  • Multiplication and Division
  • Number and Place Value
  • Ratio and Proportion
  • Statistics

 

With such a broad scope, it’s important that your child understands basic mathematical concepts such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, before introducing more difficult topics such as algebra and ratio.

 

If your child is continually struggling with a particular question type, work out why that is: what skill are they lacking? Perhaps they don’t know their times tables, or are unable to convert units of measurement. Practice SATs papers can give you a greater knowledge of your child’s weaker topics, well ahead of the SATs exam date.

 

 

KS2 SAT Maths: How to Prepare Your Child

Numeracy test puzzles

 

If you are preparing your child for their KS2 SATs, take a look at our preparation tips. When it comes to KS2 Maths revision, you can simply focus your child’s revision sessions to include the skills they will need for the exam. Why not try a combination of the revision strategies below?

 

Use Revision Cards

 

 

Plenty of mathematical topics lend themselves well to visuals, which can help learners who prefer this learning technique. Revision cards can help more interactive children to visualise their knowledge more easily.

 

Write a Maths Revision Timetable

 

 

Whether this is part of an overall study plan, or is a separate revision timetable, make sure your child is committing enough time to their maths study. Again, this can be more of a visual timetable with a wall planner, or can be a very simple spreadsheet that is easy for your child to follow from session-to-session.

 

Use Games to Make it Fun

 

 

A great way to maintain your child’s motivation for SATs study is through revision games. Revising number facts and mental arithmetic through quizzes or roleplay will help to keep them engaged for longer.

 

 

Use Practice Papers

 

 

It’s best to approach KS2 SATs revision ‘little and often’; perhaps introduce one practice SATs paper per week at first and then build up to more as the exam date gets closer. These papers will boost your child’s confidence ahead of the Maths SAT, as they will have acquired a greater knowledge of how the exam paper will be laid out and what format it will take. If your child is approaching Year 6 and will soon be sitting the KS2 SATs Maths exam, we would recommend the following practice papers:

 

Key Stage 2 SATs Practice Test 1

Key Stage 2 SATs Practice Test 2

 

Relax

 

SATs are important, but make sure that your child isn’t overworking or at risk of burning out. Encourage them to get outside and be active, to eat well and to get plenty of good quality sleep. They’ll need it if they are going to succeed in their KS2 SATs!

 

Related Posts:

KS2 SATs Preparation Tips

SATs Advice for Parents

 

Image sources:

Timy Penburg

Chaparral

Home School Mom

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Five Ways School

King Edward VI Five Ways (KEFW) is a Birmingham-based selective grammar school for boys and girls aged 11-18. Founded in 1883, it moved to its current location in Bartley Green in 1958.

Over 1,100 students are divided into four houses from Year 7. Each student aims to gain as many house points as possible throughout the school year, with a hope of winning the House Championship.

 

If you’d like to learn more about life at King Edward VI Five Ways School, watch this short promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Five Ways School

 

 

Address: King Edward VI Five Ways School, Scotland Lane, Bartley Green, Birmingham B32 4BT

County: West Midlands

Admissions Info: office@kefw.org, 0121 475 3535

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,172 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: June and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus

 

King Edward VI Five Ways School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Since 2011, all grammar schools in Birmingham follow the admissions criteria of The Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. At King Edward VI Five Ways School, all prospective Year 7 students are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. Due to substantial competition, not every child who achieves the qualifying score can be offered a place at KEFW.

 

Across grammar schools in the West Midlands, applicants are ranked according to their test score. If test scores are equal, priority is given to students who meet the following criteria:

 

  1. Looked After Children or Previously Looked After Children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score
  2. Children eligible for the Pupil Premium who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score (limited to 36 places)
  3. Other children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score

 

More information about the admission policy at King Edward VI Five Ways can be found on the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Five Ways School

 

 

If you would like your child to be considered for one of KEFW’s 180 Year 7 places, you must register online with the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. Parents also need to complete a Local Authority Preference form.

 

Exam results will be published in October, following the 11+ exam in September, although places will not be allocated until March the following year.

 

King Edward VI Five Ways School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

All eight grammar schools in Birmingham hold the same 11 Plus exam on the same day in September. The exam consists of two 50-minute tests that cover the following subjects:

 

Most of the questions across the two papers are multiple-choice and children will be required to answer on a separate sheet. All marks are standardised, to account for age differences, and are then added together.

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Five Ways School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Some children find the thought of sitting the 11 Plus exam an intimidating prospect, but with parental support and good revision techniques, the test itself needn’t cause undue worry in your household.

 

The King Edward Schools in Birmingham are hugely oversubscribed and KEFW is no different. For your child to have the best chance of gaining one of its 180 Year 7 places, they must do plenty of 11 Plus revision. The CEM 11+ exam requires excellent time management skills if pupils are going to complete all questions, so make sure your child takes practice test papers under timed conditions.

 

For the King Edward VI Five Ways School 11 Plus exam, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Five Ways School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls website

King Edward VI (KEVI) Camp Hill School for Girls was founded in 1883 and currently teaches girls aged 11 to 18. Located in the Birmingham suburb of Kings Heath, the school shares its campus with King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys.

 

Over 800 girls are provided with a high-quality education at Camp Hill School for Girls and its students regularly produce outstanding exam results, compared with other schools in the UK.

 

The school specialises in Computing, Languages and Mathematics and offers pupils first-class facilities, including specialist classrooms, a large sports hall and extensive grounds for extracurricular activities.

 

For an insight into life as a student at King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, watch this short promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls

 

 

Address: King Edward VI School Camp Hill for Girls, Vicarage Road, Kings Heath, Birmingham B14 7QJ

County: West Midlands

Admissions Info: head@kechg.org.uk, 0121 444 2150

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 863

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: July and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

All of Birmingham’s eight grammar schools follow the admissions criteria of the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. Only pupils who reach the required standard via the 11+ entrance exam will be considered for entry to Camp Hill School for Girls.

 

All prospective grammar school students in Birmingham are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. To be eligible for admission, pupils must attain the minimum ‘qualifying score’ in the exam. Parents should note however, that attainment of the qualifying score doesn’t necessarily guarantee students a place at Camp Hill School for Girls.

 

If you would like to learn more about King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls’ admission policy, please visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, parents must register their daughter directly with the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. Parents also need to complete a Local Authority (LA) Preference form; parents can choose up to six schools on this form.

 

Parents should receive 11 Plus test results in October, although places will not be allocated until March the following year.

 

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls 11+ exam consists of two papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes, with additional time for instructions. The papers are split into individually-timed sections, as follows:

 

 

Most of the questions are multiple-choice and are fully age-standardised, to ensure fairness.

 

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

For children unfamiliar with the examination process, the thought of the 11 Plus can be a daunting one and it can be an anxious time for parents too. However, with a good revision plan and use of the right practice resources, there is every chance that your daughter will perform well in the marked assessments.

 

Whatever your daughter’s academic ability, you should set a solid revision plan well ahead of the exam date. All children benefit from regular exam practice sessions, whatever their natural attainment. For the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls’ 11 Plus test, it would be a good idea to include practice exam papers in your daughter’s study plan.

 

Practice papers allow pupils to get a better idea of the types of questions they can expect in the exam and they also provide parents with a good indication of their child’s current abilities. If you spot any weaker skills or subjects, you can simply invest more time in these areas in the build-up to exam day.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we have several 11+ practice papers suitable for those sitting the CEM 11 Plus exam for King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls:

 

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys website

Founded in 1883, King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys is a selective boys’ grammar school in Birmingham. Camp Hill Boys specialises in Applied Learning, Mathematics and Science and is consistently rated as one of the most academically-successful schools in the UK.

 

In 1956, Camp Hill Boys moved to its current site in Kings Heath and now shares a campus with King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Girls, its sister school. Despite its academic success, Camp Hill Boys doesn’t rest on its reputation; it provides pupils with a well-rounded education and is always looking to build on and improve its sports teams and school facilities

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys

 

 

Address: King Edward VI School Camp Hill for Boys, Vicarage Road, Kings Heath, Birmingham B14 7QJ

County: West Midlands

Admissions Info: enquiry@camphillboys.bham.sch.uk, 0121 444 3188

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 803

Number of Places in Year 7: 95

Open Day Date: September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys is part of The Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium, which sets the admissions criteria in the West Midlands. Admission to Camp Hill for Boys is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam and as a highly selective school; only pupils who reach the required standard via this assessment will be considered for a Year 7 place.

 

As per all grammar schools in Birmingham, prospective Year 7 students at Camp Hill Boys are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. Pupils must achieve the minimum ‘qualifying score’ in the exam to be considered for a place. Parents should be aware though, that due to oversubscription, not every boy who achieves the qualifying score can be offered a place.

 

In the likely event of oversubscription, Camp Hill Boys will apply the following criteria to assign places, in order of priority:

 

  1. Looked After Children or Previously Looked After Children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score
  2. Children attracting the Pupil Premium who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score (limited to 24 places)
  3. Other children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score

 

Find out more about King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys’ admission policy.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys, parents must first register their son with the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. Next, parents should complete a Local Authority (LA) Preference form, where they can name up to six preferred schools. It is the responsibility of the LA to consider each application.

 

The local LA will send out 11 Plus test results in early March.

 

 

King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys’ 11+ exam consists of two test papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes. The papers are split into individually-timed sections that cover the following subjects:

 

 

Most of the questions across the two papers are multiple-choice and children are required to answer on a separate sheet. The tests are fully age-standardised, to take into account age differences.

 

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

In recent years, Camp Hill School for Boys has revealed that they receive 1,000 applications for their 120 Year 7 places. With an excellent reputation for academic achievement, that’s no surprise. This means that your son will have to be fully-prepared for his 11 Plus exam in order to gain a place.

 

Whether your son has natural academic talent, or struggles in particular subjects, it’s essential to set a 11 Plus revision plan well ahead of the actual exam. To prepare your son for the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys’ 11+ exam, consider using practice test papers.

 

The CEM (Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring) 11 Plus exam from University of Durham requires pupils to answer its questions quickly and confidently, without much hesitation. In order to complete the papers within the allocated time, children usually need to improve their time management skills and this is something practice exam papers can help with.

 

If your son is sitting the King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys’ 11 Plus exam, arm him with the necessary resources. We would highly recommend the following practice papers:

 

 

If your son responds well to this practice, or has a weaker subject that requires more work, take a look at our complete selection of 11 Plus practice exam papers.

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the King Edward VI Aston School website

Founded in 1883, Birmingham-based King Edward VI Aston School is a boys’ grammar and specialist sports college. One of the seven schools that make up the Foundation of the Schools of King Edward VI, Aston teaches over 750 boys aged 11-18.

 

As expected of a sports college, King Edward VI Aston School places particular emphasis on a range of sporting activities and also focuses attention on more creative outlets, such as music and drama.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for King Edward VI Aston School

 

 

Address: King Edward VI Aston School, Frederick Road, Aston, Birmingham B6 6DJ

County: West Midlands

Admissions Info: enquiry@keaston.bham.sch.uk,  0121 327 1130

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 757 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: Various: July – October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

King Edward VI Aston School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

All grammar schools in Birmingham follow the admissions criteria of The Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium. Only pupils who reach the required standard via an 11 Plus entrance exam will be considered for entry to King Edward VI Aston School.

 

In line with the Consortium’s guidelines, prospective Year 7 students are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. Pupils must attain the minimum ‘qualifying score’ in the exam to be considered for a place. However, due to the popularity of King Edward VI Aston School, not every child who achieves the qualifying score can be offered a place.

 

Applicants are ranked according to their test score and, if test scores are equal, places will be prioritised as follows:

 

  1. Looked After Children or Previously Looked After Children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score.
  2. Children attracting the Pupil Premium who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score (limited to 30 places).
  3. Other children who achieve the qualifying score by rank order of standardised score.

 

More information about the admission policy of King Edward VI Aston School can be found on the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to King Edward VI Aston School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at King Edward VI Aston School, parents must register their child directly with the Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium; this can be done online. Parents are also obligated to complete a Local Authority Preference form.

 

Parents and carers will receive their son’s 11 Plus test results in October, with Year 7 places allocated early, the following March.

 

 

King Edward VI Aston School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The King Edward VI Aston School exam consists of two test papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes. The papers are split into individually timed sections that cover:

 

 

Most of the questions across the two papers are multiple-choice and children will be required to answer on a separate sheet.

 

 

How to Prepare for the King Edward VI Aston School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

To maximise your child’s chances of success in the King Edward VI Aston School 11 Plus exam, you need to be organised and motivate your son to stick to a study plan. Investing time early in his preparation will help to keep stress levels lower as the exam date approaches. Take a look at our 11 Plus guide for parents, which will give you an overview of the exam and what to expect of the 11+ process from start to finish.

 

Birmingham is a very competitive grammar school area and King Edward VI Aston School is usually oversubscribed. So, 11 Plus revision is a must if your son is going to gain a place at the school. Practice test papers are a great way of preparing your child for the 11 Plus exam.

 

Your son will need to have excellent time management for the CEM 11+ Plus exam, as it is relatively fast-paced. Our practice papers are an effective tool for improving students’ time management skills.

 

For the King Edward VI Aston School 11 Plus exam, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about King Edward VI Aston School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Kesteven & Sleaford High School Selective Academy website

Founded in 1902, Kesteven and Sleaford High School (KSHS) is a selective school for girls aged 11-18. The school has academy status and boys can attend in sixth form from age 16.

 

Located in the market town of Seaford in Lincolnshire, KSHS currently teaches over 800 pupils. A member of the Robert Carre Trust, Ofsted praised KSHS’s ‘calm and purposeful atmosphere’ in its 2013 report.

 

For an insight into academic life at Kesteven & Sleaford High School, watch this short promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Kesteven & Sleaford High School

 

 

Address: Kesteven and Sleaford High School, Jermyn Street, Sleaford NG34 7RS

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: enquiries@kshs.uk, 01529 414044

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 833 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 128

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Kesteven & Sleaford High School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to Kesteven & Sleaford High School in Year 7 is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. KSHS fully complies with Lincolnshire County Council’s coordinated admission arrangements for Year 7, while the school carries out the 11+ tests.

 

With 128 places available in Year 7, in cases of oversubscription, the school uses the following criteria to determine pupil priority:

 

  1. The child is, or has been in the care of the Local Authority
  2. The child is registered for Pupil Premium
  3. Students who, at the time of admission, have siblings at one of the schools within the Robert Carre Trust
  4. Straight line distance from the home to KSHS, priority will be given to the child living closest to the school

 

If you have more questions about KSHS’s admissions process at Year 7, visit the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Kesteven & Sleaford High School

 

 

Kesteven & Sleaford High School complies with Lincolnshire County Council’s admission arrangements. Parents living in Lincolnshire should complete a Common Application Form (CAF) via the LA website to register their daughter for a 11 Plus exam place. Those living outside of Lincolnshire must return their CAF form to their own LA, who will forward the application to Lincolnshire LA.

 

Kesteven & Sleaford High School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Prospective pupils to Kesteven & Sleaford High School must sit two 11+ exams over two days. These exams are multiple-choice and students will be tested on:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning – this 50-minute test consists of 80 questions.
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning and Spatial Reasoning – this 40-minute test consists of 70 questions and is split into five sections.

 

How to Prepare for the Kesteven & Sleaford High School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Parents shouldn’t be worried about starting 11 Plus preparation ‘too early’; there’s no such thing. Giving your child plenty of time to study for the exams will not only improve their confidence, but will also allow you to recognise any knowledge gaps that they might have. Children typically respond better to shorter bursts of study practice, compared with sizeable chunks, so help them to prepare for the 11 Plus exam by creating a study plan that’s achievable.

 

Our 11 Plus guide for Parents will help to answer any burning questions you might have about the exam. As the Kesteven & Sleaford High School 11 Plus focuses on reasoning skills, your daughter should benefit from these articles:

 

 

Practice exam papers should also be introduced into your child’s revision timetable early on. These papers can help identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, allowing you to commit additional time to areas that need improvement. They can also help improve your daughter’s time management skills.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Kesteven & Sleaford High School 11 Plus exam. We would specifically recommend the following useful resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

 

The information provided about Kesteven & Sleaford High School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Kesteven & Grantham Girls' School website

Founded in 1910, Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School (KGGS) is a girls-only grammar school located in the Lincolnshire market town of Grantham. A selective academy, KGGS currently teaches over 1,100 girls aged 11-18.

 

Students are split across six houses that compete with each other across the school year in events such as sports, public speaking and dance shows.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School

 

 

Address: Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School, Sandon Road, Grantham NG31 9AU

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: mailto@kggs.org, 01476 563017

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,157 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 175

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School is part of the Lincolnshire Consortium of Grammar Schools, although it coordinates its 11+ testing directly. With 175 places available at Year 7, in the event of oversubscription, the school will apply the following criteria in order of priority:

 

  1. The child is in the care of the local authority or has previously been in care.
  2. The child has a sibling at the school at the time of application.
  3. Children living nearest to the school.

 

For more information about KGGS’s admissions process, visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School, parents should initially visit the Local Authority (LA) website to register their interest in a place. Next, download and complete the school’s registration form to book your child’s place in the 11 Plus exam.

 

Parents will receive exam results via post in October, ahead of the deadline for returning the parental preference form to the local authority. In March of the following year, the local authority will send out place offers based on the preferences submitted on the application form.

 

 

Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus test for Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School consists of two multiple-choice papers. The Non-Verbal Reasoning test is sat one week after the Verbal Reasoning test.

 

  • Verbal Reasoning – this 50-minute test is made-up of 80 questions.
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning – this 40-minute test is made-up of 70 questions and is split into five sections. Once a section has been completed, students cannot move onto the next one until they are told to do so.

 

How to Prepare for the Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School is a popular Lincolnshire grammar, so parents must prepare their daughter for the 11 Plus exam well ahead of the exam dates. KGGS’s 11 Plus tests focus on reasoning, so we would recommend reading the following articles ahead of your child’s revision sessions:

 

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Exam Preparation

11 Plus Non-Verbal Reasoning Advice

 

If your daughter is worried about sitting the 11+, practice exam papers can be an effective way of increasing her confidence, as they help students become familiar with the layout of the questions. Practice papers can also highlight any time management problems, so consider setting timed papers to help improve these much-needed skills.

 

Our 11 Plus practice tests can help your child to prepare for the Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School exam. We would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

 

The information provided about Kesteven & Grantham Girls’ School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Kendrick School website

Kendrick School is a selective girls’ grammar school located in Berkshire, Reading. Open to over 700 girls aged 11-18, Kendrick became an academy in 2011. A specialist school in Languages, Mathematics and Science, the school has been awarded ‘Outstanding’ in its last four Ofsted inspections.

Offering a broad curriculum, Kendrick School combines traditional and modern learning approaches to ensure its girls are fully prepared for any challenges they might face when they leave the school.

 

For an insight into life at Kendrick School watch this student-shot video, showcasing a ‘day in the life’ of a Kendrick girl:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Kendrick School

 

 

Address: Kendrick Grammar School, London Road, Reading RG1 5BN

County: Berkshire

Admissions Info: admin@kendrick.reading.sch.uk, 0118 9015859

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 709 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 95-100

Open Day Date: April

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

 

Kendrick School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to Kendrick School in Year 7 is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. If you are considering Kendrick as an option for your daughter, you are advised to attend an open event, where you can find out more about the admissions process. Kendrick School is one of a number of grammar schools in the Berkshire area that uses the same 11 plus entrance exam set by CEM (The Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring) by University of Durham.

 

Kendrick School is usually oversubscribed for Year 7 places, in which case, the school applies the following oversubscription criteria, in order of priority:

 

  1. Children who are, or have previously been, looked after.
  2. The permanent home address of the student is within the designated area of the school and the applicant is a Pupil Premium or Service Premium child.
  3. The permanent home address of the student is within the designated area of the school and this home address is the address of the parent(s)/carer(s) and the applicant.
  4. Students whose home address is not in the designated area of the school.

 

For more details about Kendrick School’s admission criteria, please visit the website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Kendrick School

 

 

To register interest for a Year 7 place at Kendrick School, parents must first complete their Local Authority’s (LA) Common Application Form (CAF). To register for the 11+ admissions test itself, parents need to complete a separate application directly with the school. The registration form can be completed online when applications are open. Parents should note that late applications will not be accepted, although the school will consider exceptional circumstances if supportive evidence is provided.

 

 

Kendrick School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Kendrick School 11 Plus exam consists of two individual papers, each lasting 50 minutes. The papers are made up of mixed questions and are mainly multiple-choice, covering:

 

 

Parents will receive results of their child’s 11+ exam in October, before the deadline for the submission of the CAF.

 

How to Prepare for the Kendrick School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

If Kendrick School is your child’s first choice, they might feel undue pressure to perform well in the 11+ exam. However, by learning how to study for the 11 Plus exam, your daughter should be able to approach the exam with confidence.

 

At Year 6, most children can only maintain their concentration for half an hour at a time, so approach 11+ revision sessions realistically. After a day at school, revision is likely to be the last thing on your daughter’s mind, so split study sessions into short, manageable blocks.

 

Kendrick School’s 11 Plus exam places a large emphasis on reasoning; if your daughter struggles with this skill (and many children do), read the following articles on how to improve her performance:

 

 

If your daughter encounters problems with time management, introduce practice exam papers into her study routine. Not only will they give her a better idea of how quickly questions should be answered in the allotted time, you will also be able to monitor your child’s progress closely, as immediate feedback is provided for each paper.

 

Our 11 Plus practice papers can help your child to prepare for the Kendrick School exam. To begin with, we would recommend:

 

 

The information provided about Kendrick School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Herschel Grammar School 11 Plus Exam

Herschel Grammar School is a selective, co-educational grammar located in the large Berkshire town of Slough. An academy school, it provides a broad and balanced curriculum to approximately 900 students.

 

Pupils at Herschel Grammar School have consistently produced good examination results in recent years and, according to Ofsted, the school shows ‘significant improvement’ between Year 7 and Year 11.

 

For an insight into academic life at Herschel Grammar School watch this short promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Herschel Grammar School

 

 

Address: Herschel Grammar School, Northampton Avenue, Slough SL1 3BW

County: Berkshire

Admissions Info: mail@herschel.slough.sch.uk, 01753 520950

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 879 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: May

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

 

Herschel Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

There are currently 150 Year 7 places available at Herschel Grammar School and

admission is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. Unlike many other UK grammar schools, Herschel hosts an information evening for parents only. The event, which takes place in May, enables parents to find out more information on the school’s admission process.

 

Admissions to Herschel Grammar School are coordinated through the Slough Consortium of Grammar Schools and parents must register online ahead of their child’s 11+ exam date. In cases of oversubscription, the school will adhere to the following criteria, in order of priority:

 

  • Students who are, or have previously been, in looked-after care.
  • Students who have an Education Health and Care Plan and have reached the required standard.
  • Students who have a permanent home address within 10 miles of the school and who are eligible for the Pupil Premium (up to 30 places).

 

Remaining pupils will be ranked in order of their performance in the entrance exams.

 

For more details on Herschel Grammar School’s admission criteria, please visit the website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Herschel Grammar School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Herschel Grammar School, parents must register their child with the Slough Consortium in the first instance. Next, parents must complete a Common Application Form (CAF); this can be done online via Slough County Council.

 

As Herschel Grammar School follows Slough Consortium’s schedule for Year 7 place allocation, parents are advised to consult this key dates document to ensure your child is registered in time for the 11 Plus exam.

 

 

Herschel Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Herschel Grammar School 11+ exam consists of two individual papers, each lasting approximately 60-65 minutes. The papers across all schools in the Slough Consortium are the same and cover a mixture of questions that test Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Numerical Reasoning.

 

Parents will receive their child’s exam results online in October, before the deadline for submission of the CAF. All results are fully age standardised.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Herschel Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

While it’s understandable that some children are nervous about the idea of sitting the 11 Plus exam, with the right study plan, it needn’t cause any undue anxiety. Similarly, as a parent you might be worried about your child in the tests, but our parents’ guide to the 11 Plus should allay any fears.

 

Don’t leave your child’s 11 Plus preparation until the last minute; set aside time daily for your child to revise. It’s a good idea to introduce practice exam papers into your child’s study routine early on, as these will give them a clearer idea of the structure of the exam. Ensure that your child takes our practice papers under timed conditions, as this will get them used to answering questions quickly and under pressure.

 

Our 11 Plus practice papers can help your child to prepare for the Herschel Grammar School exam. As a starting point, we would recommend:

 

 

The information provided about Herschel Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

High School for Girls 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

High School for Girls, Gloucester is a selective grammar school for girls aged 11-18. It accepts boys into the Sixth Form and, in total, the school teaches over 800 pupils. High School for Girls is an academy and, due to its excellent exam results, it is consistently ranked as one of the best schools in England.

 

Founded in 1883, High School for Girls divides its pupils into five houses: Barwell, Bearland, Hartland Kyneburga and Mynd. Throughout each year, the houses compete in various sporting activities in an effort to win the school cup.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for The High School for Girls

 

 

Address: Gloucester High School for Girls, Denmark Road, Gloucester GL1 3JN

County: Gloucestershire

Admissions Info: office@hsfg.org, 01452 543335

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 849 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: April and June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (Gloucestershire)

 

The High School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

For your child to be in with a chance of gaining one of the 150 Year 7 places at the school, she must reach the required standard in the 11 Plus exam. As per all the other grammar schools in Gloucestershire, High School for Girls’ Year 7 allocations are dealt with via Gloucestershire County Council. Parents who wish their daughter to sit the test must complete the Gloucestershire Grammar Test Registration Form, which can be found on the school’s website when registration is open.

 

In recent years, there has been three applications for every place, so in the event of oversubscription, the school will give priority to girls scoring highest in the 11 plus examination. Should there be a tie for places after this, the admissions’ authority will allocate places at random.

 

To find out more about High School for Girls’ admissions process, or to see key dates for the process, visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to The High School for Girls

 

 

All seven grammar schools in the county of Gloucestershire adhere to the same testing process from CEM (Centre of Evaluation and Monitoring). In order for your daughter to be considered for a place at High School for Girls, you must complete a Common Application Form online via the Local Authority and a test registration form, available online via the school itself.

 

Late registrations will not be accepted, but if a child is unable to sit a test due to illness, an accident, or sudden bereavement, the school may make arrangements for them to sit a ‘Late Test’, although this is not guaranteed.

 

Parents will receive results in October and if your daughter meets the qualifying standard, you can apply for a place at the High School for Girls.

 

 

The High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Since 2013, High School for Girls has adopted the CEM 11 Plus exam, which consists of two papers covering:

 

 

Both tests last 45-50 minutes, are made up of multiple-choice questions and are taken on the same day.

 

Our guide to 11+ exam boards will give you more information about what to expect from the CEM test.

 

 

How to Prepare for The High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

High School for Girls is one of the top selective schools in the UK and competition for Year 7 entry is strong. With only 150 places available, your daughter should prepare for the 11+ exam well ahead of exam day. We know it can be difficult to motivate your child to study regularly for upcoming exams, so keep it fun. Suggest interesting books to read that will improve their comprehension, or adapt some of these revision games to suit their preferred learning style. Soon enough, your child will consider 11 Plus revision as part of a normal day.

 

Have you considered practice exam papers? They can provide effective revision practice and help familiarise your daughter with the layout of the exam. We would recommend:

 

 

Alternatively, if your child requires additional practice in a particular subject, you can choose from our full selection of 11 Plus practice exam papers, available now.
The information provided about the High School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Invicta Grammar School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Invicta Grammar School is a girls’ grammar based in the Maidstone area of Kent. The school has academy status and became a specialist Business and Enterprise College in 2003. It currently teaches over 1,100 girls aged 11-18, although some boys are admitted into the sixth from age 16.

 

For an insight into academic life at Year 7 at Invicta Grammar Schoo,l watch this short promotional video:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Invicta Grammar School

 

 

Address: Invicta Grammar School, Huntsman Lane, Maidstone ME14 5DR

County: Kent

Admissions Info: office@invicta.viat.org.uk, 01622 357012

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,141 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 192

Open Day Date: May – July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test

 

 

Invicta Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Prospective pupils must sit the Kent Test at 11 Plus and achieve the required standard to be considered for a place in Year 7. The school strongly advises that students and parents arrange a visit before registering and attend one of its open events, which includes familiarisation workshops. At the open events, school staff are on hand to answer any questions regarding the admissions process and parents will get the opportunity to tour the school with a current student.

 

Invicta Grammar School has changed its admissions process in recent years, so parents are advised to read its current admissions policy before registering their daughter for a Year 7 place.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Invicta Grammar School

 

 

Parents who wish to register their daughter to sit the entrance tests must register with the school before the exam date. To register for the Kent Test at 11+, you must complete an online registration form.

 

Once your daughter has sat the Kent Test at 11+, parents must complete the Secondary Common Application Form and submit it to Kent County Council. This process can usually be done online. The Council will send assessment results to parents in October and offers will be sent out on National Offer Day in March the following year.

 

If you have any further queries about Invicta Grammar School’s admissions process at Year 7, call the school on 01622 357012 or email office@invicta.viat.org.uk.

 

 

Invicta Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

In line with the majority of grammar schools in Kent, Invicta uses the Kent 11 Plus exam. The Kent Exam consists of two multiple-choice papers, with separate answer sheets, in the following format:

 

  1. An hour-long exam that tests pupils’ reasoning abilities. Girls will be tested on Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Spatial Reasoning.
  2. An hour-long exam that tests English and Maths.
  3. A writing task that lasts for 40 minutes, including 10 minutes’ preparation time. This task isn’t marked for the purposes of the 11 Plus exam but may be used as evidence for borderline cases.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Invicta Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Kent is the largest and most competitive grammar school area in England, so it’s vital that your daughter makes the most of her revision time and resources in the lead-up to the test.

 

Research into exam revision has shown that children are likely to perform better in exams if they have revised over a longer period, rather than have crammed a day or two beforehand. This revision should be broken down into manageable doses, little and often, rather than for extended periods. With regular revision, you should see an uplift in your daughter’s performance.

 

The Kent Test covers a number of subjects and it’s possible that your daughter is stronger in some areas and weaker in others. If that’s the case, we recommend practice exam papers as a good way to highlight those areas early on. Don’t be afraid to introduce these papers at the beginning of your child’s revision for the 11 Plus, as they will allow you to monitor their progress.

 

Pupils sitting the Kent Test, with a view of gaining a Year 7 place at Invicta Grammar School, will benefit from these resources, which have been specifically designed to replicate the Kent 11 Plus exam’s format, structure, style, timings and question types:

 

 

As previously mentioned, if your daughter does require additional revision in a particular subject or two, these practice exam papers are suitable as they contain multiple-chocie questions similar to the ones she will be asked in the exam:

 

The information provided about Invicta Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Ilford County High School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Ilford County High School (ICHS) is a selective grammar school located in Barkingside and remains the only boys’ selective school in the London Borough of Redbridge. Founded in 1901, the school currently teaches a broad curriculum to around 1,000 boys, in a challenging yet supportive learning environment.

 

In 2012, the school joined the Leading Edge Partnership, which encourages schools across the UK to learn from each other. The school offers a mix of extracurricular activities to suit their pupils’ wide variety of interests.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Ilford County High School

 

 

Address: Ilford County High School, Fremantle Road, Barkingside, Ilford

County: London Borough of Redbridge

Admissions Info: enquiries@ichs.org.uk, 020 8551 6496

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 999 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

 

Ilford County High School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Year 7 admissions to Ilford County High School are managed by the local authority, the London Borough of Redbridge (LBR). With 180 places available, parents are advised to visit ICHS ahead of registration to ensure it is the right learning environment for their son.

 

ICHS is often oversubscribed for places in Year 7 and in this case, the school uses the following criteria, in order of priority:

 

  • Children who are looked after, or have previously been looked after.
  • Children with exceptional medical or psychological needs.
  • Children with a sibling already at the school.
  • Children who live closest to the school.

 

If you have any questions about ICHS’s admissions process, you must contact the LBR’s Secondary Admissions Department directly on 0208 478 3020.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Ilford County High School

 

 

Year 7 admission to Ilford County High School is based on the results of an 11 Plus exam entrance test. Parents must register their child before the closing date via the LBR’s website. LBR does not accept any late applications, even under exceptional circumstances.

 

 

Ilford County High School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Ilford County High School uses the CEM (The Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring) exam by the University of Durham. The exam covers the following subjects:

 

 

The tests are multiple-choice and results are fully standardised and age weighted, to ensure fairness for those sitting the exams.

 

How to Prepare for the Ilford County High School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

In order to gain one of the 180 Year 7 places at Ilford County High School, your son may need to invest a significant amount of time in his 11+ exam preparation. Take a look at our guide to studying for the 11+ exam and help your son to create an in-depth study plan well ahead of the exam date.

 

The ICHS 11 Plus exam places emphasis on reasoning ability (numerical, verbal and non-verbal), so if your son requires some additional work in this area, we would suggest reading the following articles:

 

 

To give your child the best chance of gaining a place at ICHS, introduce practice exam papers into their revision routine early on, ideally under timed conditions.

 

For Ilford County High School 11 Plus revision, we would specifically recommend that your son works through these resources:

 

 

The information provided about Ilford County High School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Highworth Grammar School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Founded in 1904, Highworth Grammar School is a selective, state-funded grammar open to girls aged 11-18, although boys are welcome in the sixth form. In 2011, the school gained academy status and has had Music Specialist Status since 2005.

 

With approximately 1300 pupils, the school teaches a traditional curriculum with an innovative streak. According to the school itself, they are ‘constantly looking to find ways of improving what [they] do’.

 

For an insight into academic life at Highworth Grammar School, watch this short promotional video, filmed by students:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Highworth Grammar School

 

 

Address: Highworth Grammar School, Quantock Drive, Ashford TN24 8UD

County: Kent

Admissions Info: office@highworth.kent.sch.uk, 01233 624910

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,241 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 184

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

Highworth Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

All 184 Year 7 places at Highworth Grammar School are allocated on the basis of student performance in the Kent 11 Plus Test, created by GL Assessment. All admissions are dealt with by the Local Authority (LA) and when parents are applying, they must apply directly to Kent County Council.

 

In cases where there are more suitable candidates than Year 7 places, Highworth Grammar School uses its oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Children in Local Authority Care.
  • Children who already have a sibling at the school at time of entry.
  • Children who have health or special access reasons.
  • Children who live closer to the school, at a permanent address.

 

Should a student not receive a Year 7 place at Highworth Grammar School, parents can appeal the decision. Our guide to grammar school appeals explains the process in detail for parents or guardians.

 

More information about Highworth Grammar School’s admission criteria is available on the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Highworth Grammar School

 

 

All applications for 11+ entry to Highworth Grammar School must go through the Local Authority, Kent County Council. Parents must complete the LA’s Secondary Common Application Form (SCAF), which can be done online. It is the LA that coordinates all Year 7 places, not the school, so parents are advised to contact the LA directly with any specific registration questions.

 

 

Highworth Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

To be considered for a Year 7 place at Highworth Grammar School, girls must reach the required standard in the Kent 11 Plus test. This test is standard across the county of Kent and most selective grammar schools in the area adhere to it.

 

The Kent 11+ exam is split into three sections:

 

  • Section 1 focuses on English and maths. Each subject is assessed with of a 5-minute practice exercise and a 25-minute test. The paper is multiple-choice and an hour long overall.
  • Section 2 tests students’ reasoning abilities. The test is split into three sections: Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Spatial Reasoning. The test is multiple-choice and an hour long in total.
  • Section 3 is a writing task that lasts for 40 minutes. This is not marked as part of the overall 11+ score, but is considered when looking at borderline cases, or during an appeal process.

 

To get a better idea of what to expect from the Kent 11+ test, including a sample question, take a look at this article for parents.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Highworth Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

If your daughter is due to sit the Highworth Grammar School 11 Plus, she will require a supportive and structured study environment. Whatever her attainment levels, your daughter is likely to benefit from regular revision, covering the key subjects she’ll be tested on in the exam itself.

 

The Kent Test’s English section requires good comprehension skills, so encourage your child to read freely and then discuss their understanding of what they have read. Start with this reading list for 11 Plus level.

 

Our online practice papers will give your daughter the best possible chance of success in the Kent 11 Plus exam, with a view to gaining a Year 7 place at Highworth. The two resources below have been specifically designed for the Kent Test, and we would highly recommend including them in your daughter’s study plan. They replicate the format and style of the actual Kent Test covering all subjects, including Spatial Reasoning:

 

 

As the exam date draws closer, give your daughter additional papers to sit under timed conditions to help her better manage time pressure in the actual exam. The resources below will help as they all contain timed tests with questions like those that will appear in the Kent Test:

 

 

The information provided about Highworth Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Highsted Grammar School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Founded in 1904, Highsted Grammar School admits girls aged 11-18. Previously known as Sittingbourne High School for Girls until the 1950s, over 800 pupils currently attend this state-funded, selective grammar school in Kent.

 

In 2011, the school was converted into an academy and has gained recognition as a Specialist Science School. With an ‘Outstanding’ assessment from Ofsted, Highsted Grammar School prides itself on providing a traditional curriculum for its girls, while preparing them for the modern world.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Highsted Grammar School

 

 

Address: Highsted Grammar School, Highsted Road, Sittingbourne ME10 4PT

County: Kent

Admissions Info: admin@highsted.kent.sch.uk, 01795 424223

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 853 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL) / Highsted Test (optional)

 

 

Highsted Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

To be considered for a Year 7 place at Highsted Grammar School, pupils must sit the Kent 11 Plus Test. Since 2016, prospective pupils also have the option of taking the Highsted Test, set by the school itself. Both tests aim to assess whether a grammar school education is a suitable option for your child.

 

With 120 Year 7 places available at Highsted, should applications exceed this number, the school uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Children in Local Authority Care.
  • Children with a sibling at the school at the time of entry.
  • Children who, for health reasons, require them to attend a particular school.
  • Children who live closest to the school.

 

The parents of students who are not awarded a grammar school place at Highsted can appeal the decision in front of an Independent Appeals Panel.

 

Parents are also advised to check Highsted’s admission process directly via the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Highsted Grammar School

 

 

As Highsted Grammar School uses the Kent Test as a means of selection, parents must register online with Kent Local Authority (LA). Parents also have the option of registering their daughter for the Highsted Test, which is an additional test, but entirely optional. If you would like your daughter to sit the optional test, download and complete this registration form. The Highsted test has equal status for a place in Year 7 as a pass in the Kent Test.

 

Parents will receive results via post in mid-October and can also access the result via the LA’s website.

 

 

Highsted Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The majority of Kent-based selective schools require pupils to sit the Kent 11 Plus exam and Highsted Grammar School is no exception. The Kent Test consists of two multiple-choice tests.

 

Test 1: This is an hour-long exam, split into two sections that cover English and maths. Each section has a 5-minute practice exercise and a 25-minute test.

 

Test 2: This is a 60-minute test, focusing on reasoning, which is split into three sections:

 

Pupils must also complete a 40-minute writing task, which might be referred to during borderline or appeal cases.

 

The Highsted Test also consists of two papers, that cover:

 

  1. Verbal ability, numeracy and non-verbal reasoning
  2. English – focusing on reading and writing skills

 

 

How to Prepare for the Highsted Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Ensure that your daughter is confident going into the Highsted Grammar School 11 Plus exam by starting revision early. Your child is likely to learn better if revision periods are split into manageable chunks, rather than lengthy, irregular sessions. Ensure that she is familiar with the layout of the exam and the types of questions she may be asked by referring to our practice exam paper resources. If you start this type of practice early enough, you will have a greater understanding of the areas that need more work.

 

To help your daughter gain a Year 7 place at Highsted Grammar School, we have created two practice tests specifically for the Kent Test:

 

 

If your daughter needs to work on a particular subject, or simply needs more practice, why not try some of the practice exam paper packs below under timed conditions?

 

 

The information provided about Highsted Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Gravesend Grammar School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Gravesend Grammar School is a selective grammar school for boys aged 11-18. Girls are accepted into the sixth form from 16+. Based in Kent, Gravesend Grammar School was founded in 1893 and in 2011 became an academy. The school gained status as a maths and computing specialist school in 2004 and then, in 2008, also achieved specialist status as a language school.

 

Gravesend Grammar educates over 1,200 pupils, who experience a traditional academic curriculum and strong pastoral care from staff.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Gravesend Grammar School

 

 

Address: Gravesend Grammar School, Church Walk, Gravesend DA12 2PR

County: Kent

Admissions Info: cooki@gravesendgrammar.eu, 01474 331893

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,213 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test (GL)

 

 

Gravesend Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Year 7 admission to Gravesend Grammar School is determined by student performance in the Kent 11 Plus Test. Students currently in Year 5 at primary school are encouraged to attend Gravesend’s information evening in June of the summer term. This allows children to learn more about life at the grammar school and parents can ask questions about the admission process. The school provides a parents’ handbook for further information.

 

There is a total of 150 Year 7 places at the school. Should the number of boys who reach the required standard exceed the number of places available, the school uses the following criteria to allocate places:

 

  • Boys in Local Authority Care.
  • Boys with mental or physical impairments.
  • Boys with a sibling at the school.
  • Boys with a parent working at the school.

 

The school will also give priority to boys living within its catchment area.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Gravesend Grammar School

 

 

In the first instance, parents must register their child to sit the Kent Test; this can be done online via Kent County Council. Once the child has sat the test in September, parents will receive the results in October and must then submit their Secondary School Common Application Form (SCAF), again via the Kent Local Authority website.

 

 

Gravesend Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Gravesend Grammar School follows the Kent 11 Plus exam format, which is made up of: Reasoning, Maths and English, plus a writing task.

 

Your child can expect the following exam format:

 

  • Section 1:  This is an hour-long multiple-choice exam that aims to test students’ reasoning abilities. It is broken down into three sections: Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.
  • Section 2: This is an hour-long multiple-choice exam that tests English and Maths.
  • Section 3: This is a 40-minute writing task. While not marked as part of the overall 11 Plus score, it can be used as evidence for both borderline cases and in appeals for a grammar school place.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Gravesend Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

The county of Kent is both the largest and most competitive grammar school area in the UK, so it’s imperative that your son prepares well for the Kent Test if you are aiming for Gravesend Year 7 entry.

 

Maximise the time your child has to revise by starting the process early and, in the lead-up to the exam, give them the best resources available. By being organised and sticking to a clear revision strategy, your son will find the Kent Test much easier to tackle.

 

Consider adding practice exam papers into your child’s revision routine ahead of the 11 Plus, as these can help you to monitor their progress and enable them to feel more comfortable with the whole process.
The following practice resources have been specifically designed for the Kent Test:

 

 

If your child needs additional practice in a particular subject area, we would recommend the following practice packs:

 

 

 

If you are concerned that you’ve left your son’s 11 Plus revision a little late, don’t worry; we have put together some actionable last minute tips on how to prepare for the exam.

 

The information provided about Gravesend Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

The Henrietta Barnett School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Founded in 1911, the Henrietta Barnett School (HBS) is a grammar school for girls aged 11 – 18. Located in the quiet surroundings of Hampstead Garden Suburb, the school became an academy in 2012.

 

HBS is known as one of the best academic state schools in the UK and consistently receives ‘outstanding’ Ofsted ratings. The school specialises in Music and English and, prior to becoming an academy, it was a Specialist Music College with English.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for The Henrietta Barnett School

 

 

Address: Henrietta Barnett School, Central Square, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London NW11 7BN

County: Hertfordshire/London Borough of Barnet

Admissions Info: admissions@hbschool.org.uk, 020 8458 8999

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 745 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 95 (approximately)

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September (Round One) and October (Round Two)

Exam Board Type: Part 1: CEM (University of Durham), Part 2 is written and set by the school

 

 

The Henrietta Barnett School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to The Henrietta Barnett School for Year 7 is by academic selection, following an 11 Plus exam. With over 2,000 applications and less than 100 Year 7 places available, the school strongly encourages prospective students and their parents to attend one of their open days, which take place in July, to ensure HBS is the right learning environment for the student.

 

In the likely event that there are more applicants than available places, the school uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Children in looked after care, or those who have previously been in looked after care.
  • Children eligible for Pupil Premium funding (up to 20 candidates only).
  • All remaining candidates in rank score order from 11 Plus exam(s).

 

For more information on The Henrietta Barnett School’s admission criteria, please visit the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to The Henrietta Barnett School

 

 

HBS follows the admissions process operated by the London Borough of Barnet. For your daughter to be considered for a Year 7 place, you must complete both the Common Application Form (CAF) via Barnet Local Authority and The Henrietta Barnett School Entrance Test Entry Form, which can be found on the school’s website when registration is open.

 

It is important that parents apply to both the school and the Local Authority to be considered for a Year 7 place at HBS. If parents do not complete the school’s entry form on time, their daughter will not be able to take the entrance exam.

 

 

The Henrietta Barnett School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Henrietta Barnett School 11+ test consists of two rounds, divided as follows:

 

 

Following Round One, results from both sections will be combined and placed in rank order. The top 300 students will be invited back to sit the second exam (below).

 

  • Round Two: English and Mathematics. The English section will test a student’s comprehension and creative writing skills, while the maths section focuses on problem solving skills.

 

The results of both tests will be used to determine the final rankings and place allocations for Year 7.

 

 

How to Prepare for The Henrietta Barnett School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

As one of the top girls’ schools in Britain, it’s no surprise that competition for Year 7 places at The Henrietta Barnett School is intense. However, by creating a good 11 Plus study plan, your child should be able to approach the exam confidently.

 

HBS is very clear about what students should expect from the entrance exam, so ensure that your daughter works on her Verbal Reasoning skills and make sure you read our 11 Plus guide to maths before creating a revision schedule. Practice exam papers are a great way to get your daughter used to the style of questions in the HBS 11 Plus exam and these papers can also help your child to work on their time-keeping ahead of the big day.

 

To begin with, why not try the resources outlined below?

 

11 Plus Maths: Short Numerical Reasoning (CEM) Pack 1  

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning (CEM) Pack 1

11 Plus  Comprehension (Verbal Reasoning CEM) Pack 1

11 Plus Cloze (Verbal Reasoning CEM) Pack 1

11 Plus Spelling

 

For Round 2 of the Henrietta Barnet 11 plus exam, the following packs will prove useful:

 

11 Plus English Pack 1 (Open Answer)

11 Plus English Pack 2 (Open Answer)

11 Plus Maths Pack 1 (Open Answer)

11 Plus Maths Pack 2 (Open Answer)

 

 

The information provided about Henrietta Barnett School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Founded in 1898, Heckmondwike Grammar School (HGS) is a co-educational grammar school and sixth form based in West Yorkshire that teaches children aged 11 – 18. A Technology College, HGS gained academy status in 2010 and has since specialised as a Language College. Over 1,300 pupils are split across four houses: Brontë, Clarke, Houldsworth and Priestley, and compete in inter-house competitions.

 

A high-performing academic school, HGS not only consistently appears in the top 100 state schools in Britain, it also prides itself on offering an array of extracurricular activities for pupils, including drama, arts and music.

 

For an insight into academic life at Heckmondwike Grammar School watch this short video that showcases the music department:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Heckmondwike Grammar School

 

 

Address: Heckmondwike Grammar School, High Street, Heckmondwike WF16 0AH

County: Yorkshire (Kirklees)

Admissions Info: info@heckgrammar.co.uk, 01924 402202

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,324 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

 

Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Year 7 admission to Heckmondwike Grammar School is managed by the local authority, Kirklees Council. There are 180 places available in Year 7 and parents are encouraged to visit HGS ahead of registration. This allows both parents and children to learn more about the admission process and to ensure a grammar school education is suitable for the child.

 

Parents must include HGS as one of their school choices via the local authority’s common application system, which can be completed online. Usually, HGS is over-subscribed for places in Year 7 and uses the following criteria to determine priority:

 

  • Children who are in, or have previously been in, public care.
  • Children within the school’s catchment area.
  • Children with siblings already at the school.
  • Children who have a parent employed at the school at time of application and entry.

 

More information about the HGS’ admission criteria can be found on the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Heckmondwike Grammar School

 

 

Year 7 admission to Heckmondwike Grammar School is based on the results of an 11 Plus exam entrance test. To enter for this exam, parents must register their child before the closing date via the Local Authority website. Parents must also complete a Supplementary Information Form via the school’s website.

 

Children of parents who miss the registration deadline will be considered as late applicants and those applications will only be considered once the initial round of allocations has been completed.

 

 

Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

In 2014, Heckmondwike Grammar School adopted the CEM (The Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring) exam by University of Durham. This test consists of two papers covering:

 

 

Each paper contains a mix of multiple-choice and standard format questions and the papers tend to present pupils with a mix of questions one after the other. Typically, students can expect a short maths section, and a longer problem-solving exercise, followed by plenty of vocabulary assessments in various formats as well as some comprehension. Children must manage their time well in order to complete the tests.

 

Test results are fully standardised and age weighted, to ensure fairness for all those sitting the exams. Parents will receive the 11 Plus test results in mid-October and the Local Authority will distribute formal offers in early March.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

To succeed in the 11 Plus exam, children need to be focused and invest time in their revision. Begin with our guide to studying for the 11+ exam and create a thorough study plan well ahead of the exam date.

 

The Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus exam focuses heavily on reasoning ability, so we would recommend reading the following articles on the relevant subjects:

 

 

The school is open to 180 new Year 7 students, but has reported receiving in excess of 800 registrations each year, so competition is very strong. To give your child the best chance of gaining a place at HGS, make sure they are taking practice exam papers under timed conditions. To complete the CEM 11 Plus test, pupils must answer questions quickly. In the final few weeks before the real exams, your child should sit practice papers under timed conditions until they can finish all the questions in the test papers within the allocated time.

 

For Heckmondwike Grammar School 11 Plus revision, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Heckmondwike Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Handsworth Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus (11+) Exam Information

Handsworth Grammar School (HGS) was founded in 1862 and today is a selective grammar school for boys aged 11-18. Located in Handsworth, just outside of Birmingham city centre, HGS is the oldest surviving selective school in the area.

 

Since 1997, girls have been permitted to attend the school’s sixth form and in total, the school teaches over 900 pupils. The school puts significant emphasis on teaching a well-rounded curriculum, one that accounts for pupils’ cultural and academic development. In Year 7, for example, pupils are required to complete ‘The Opening Minds Project’, covering subjects such as Citizenship.

 

For an insight into academic life at Handsworth Grammar School, watch this short promotional video:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Handsworth Grammar School

 

 

Address: Handsworth Grammar School, Grove Lane, Handsworth, Birmingham B21 9ET

County: West Midlands

Admissions Info: 0121 554 2794

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 936 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: June / September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

 

Handsworth Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

In Birmingham, all eight grammar schools follow the admission criteria of ‘The Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium’. Only pupils who reach the required standard via an entrance exam will be considered for entry to Handsworth Grammar School.

 

The Consortium requires that students are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. To be eligible for admission, pupils must attain the minimum ‘qualifying score’ in the exam. Parents should note however, that attainment of the qualifying score doesn’t necessarily guarantee students a place at Handsworth.

 

Applicants are ranked according to their test score and if test scores are equal, priority is given to:

 

  • Looked after children and previously looked after children.
  • Children who live closest to the school.

 

More information about the admission policy at Handsworth Grammar School can be found on the school’s website.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Handsworth Grammar School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Handsworth Grammar School, parents need to register their child by completing an online application form. Additionally, parents must complete a Local Authority Preference form. In order to complete the full application, parents must also provide a recent passport sized-photograph of their child, which can be emailed alongside the required forms.

 

Parents will receive their son’s 11 Plus test results in October, although place allocations will not be known until the following March.

 

 

Handsworth Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Handsworth Grammar School exam consists of two test papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes, with additional time for instructions. The papers are split into individually-timed sections that cover:

 

 

Most of the questions across the two papers are multiple-choice and children will be required to answer on a separate sheet.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Handsworth Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Many children are at first anxious about sitting the 11 Plus exam, but with thorough and regular revision, you can ensure that your child takes exam day in their stride.

 

Practice exam papers are an invaluable part of your son’s Handsworth Grammar School 11+ preparation. Doing these papers under timed conditions are a long-standing, proven method of effective revision. Not only do they give your child a clearer idea of the structure of the exam, they are also shown to improve a child’s time management – something that’s vital with the relatively quick-paced CEM 11 Plus exam.

 

We have a bundle of specific 11 Plus practice papers that can help your child prepare effectively for the Handsworth Grammar School exam. We would recommend:

 

 

The information provided about Handsworth Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Fort Pitt Grammar School website

Fort Pitt Grammar School is a selective girls’ grammar, with over 900 pupils aged between 11 and 18. Located in Chatham, one of the Medway towns in Kent, Fort Pitt gained academy status in 2010 and, since 2012, has worked with two other local schools as part of the Fort Pitt Grammar School Academy Trust. After merging the Trust with The Thomas Aveling School to form FPTA Academies, Fort Pitt was designated both a ‘Leading Edge’ school and a National Support School.

 

Pupils from all four houses compete in a number of events throughout the school year, including sports days, inter-house quizzes and academic events.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Fort Pitt Grammar School

 

 

Address: Fort Pitt Grammar School, Fort Pitt Hill, Chatham ME4 6TJ

County: Kent – Medway

Admissions Info: office@fortpitt.medway.sch.uk, 01634 842359

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 900 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Medway 11 Plus (CEM)

 

 

Fort Pitt Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

In Year 7, there are 120 places available at Fort Pitt determined by students’ performance in an entrance exam. Ahead of submitting an application, the school encourages parents to visit one of its open events. Schools within the Medway local authority use different allocation criteria for Year 7 places, so parents are advised to confirm Fort Pitt’s exact admission criteria directly with the school before completing the Common Application Form (CAF).

 

The Medway Test is only used by Medway grammar schools and children who attend a primary school in the area will take the 11 Plus exam at their current school. Those living outside of the area will take the exam in an independent test centre. Schools in Medway send parents their child’s 11+ result before having to choose which schools to apply for, which aims to ensure you make the best decision for your child.

 

More information on the Fort Pitt Grammar School exam can be accessed on the Medway local authority website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Fort Pitt Grammar School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Fort Pitt Grammar School, parents must complete the Common Application Form (CAF), as administered by the Medway local authority. All primary schools within the Medway area will receive booklets entitled ‘Admission to Secondary School: A Guide for Parents’ to distribute, which explains more about the registration process.

 

In the case of oversubscription for places, the school uses criteria outlined here to determine which students are given priority.

 

 

Fort Pitt Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The Fort Pitt Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of:

 

 

Both the verbal reasoning and maths tests are multiple-choice and last 50 minutes each. The English test usually takes the form of an essay and also lasts 50 minutes, which includes 10 minutes of planning time.

 

Previously in The Medway Test, the 11 Plus Maths and writing sections have been double-weighted in comparison to the Verbal Reasoning. That means the maths and writing scores are given twice the importance of the Verbal Reasoning score in the Medway 11+.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Fort Pitt Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

To be considered for a place at Fort Pitt Grammar School, your daughter must sit the Medway Test at 11 Plus. To maximise your child’s chance of success, it’s important keep stress levels low. When to start 11 Plus preparation is up to parents, but at Exam Papers Plus, we would recommend starting early rather than having to cram for the 11+ at the last minute. A steady approach to exam revision means your daughter is more likely to approach the Fort Pitt exam calmly and confidently.

 

The Medway Test doesn’t allow much time for pondering on answers, so ahead of the exam itself, encourage your daughter to do some 11 Plus practice papers, particularly under timed conditions, to get her used to answering questions quickly and under pressure.

 

For the Fort Pitt Grammar School 11+ exam, we would recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Maths (CEM)

11+ CEM Comprehension

11+ CEM Cloze

11+ English Spelling

11+ Verbal Reasoning (CEM)

 

The information provided about Fort Pitt Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Ermysted’s Grammar School website

Founded in 1492, Ermysted’s Grammar School is located in the market town of Skipton in North Yorkshire. A selective school with over 800 boys in attendance, Ermysted’s is funded by its local education authority. The seventh oldest school in Great Britain, the school has consistently reported excellent examination results and in 2006 was noted as the best school in Yorkshire, and amongst the top 25 nationally.

 

Pupils are split into four houses: Ermysted, Hartley, Petyt and Toller, all named after notable figures in the school’s history. Throughout the school year, the houses participate in a variety of competitions.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Ermysted’s Grammar School

 

 

Address: Ermysted Grammar School, Gargrave Road, Skipton BD23 1PL

County: North Yorkshire

Admissions Info: admin@ermysteds.n-yorks.sch.uk, 01756 792186

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 815 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Ermysted’s Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Ermysted’s Grammar School is maintained by the North Yorkshire Education Authority, which coordinates all of the School’s admissions via its selection scheme. There are 120 places available at Year 7 and priority is given to those who live within the school’s catchment area. To be considered for a place at the school, all prospective pupils must take the 11 Plus test coordinated by GL Assessment.

 

The school will offer places to the highest scoring 28% of pupils who live within the catchment area. In the event of any surplus places, these will be offered to pupils outside of the catchment.

 

In recent years, there has been five Year 7 applications for every one place, so in the event of oversubscription, the school will adhere to the following criteria in order of priority:

 

  • Boys who are currently, or have previously been, looked after by the Local Authority.
  • Boys who live within the catchment area.
  • Boys who live outside of the catchment area.

 

Get more details about Ermysted’s Year 7 admission criteria.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Ermysted’s Grammar School

 

 

Boys living within Ermysted’s Grammar School’s catchment area will be automatically entered into the Local Authority’s selection scheme (unless parents choose to withdraw their child from the process). Those living outside of the catchment can apply online via the Local Authority’s website. Parents should be aware that testing may not be possible for pupils who registered after the closing date until after the date of allocation of school places.

 

Parents will receive details of their child’s results in October and place allocations will be distributed in March the following year.

 

 

Ermysted’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus test for Ermysted’s Grammar School consists of two multiple-choice papers:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning – this 50-minute test is made-up of 80 questions
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning – this 40-minute test is divided into four sections, with 10 minutes allocated to each one. Once a section has been completed by pupils, they cannot go back to that section.

 

How to Prepare for the Ermysted’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

With its strong reputation for an excellent all-round education, Ermysted’s Grammar School attracts applicants from over 50 primary schools in its local area and beyond. With this in mind, parents should be prepared to start their child’s 11 Plus revision well ahead of the actual exam.

 

North Yorkshire’s Local Authority 11 Plus tests focus on reasoning, so we would recommend reading the following articles ahead of your child’s revision sessions:

 

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Exam Preparation

11 Plus Non-Verbal Reasoning Advice

 

Practice exam papers can be an effective way of increasing your child’s confidence for the Ermysted’s Grammar School’s 11+, as they can help familiarise them with the test requirements and better understand the types of reasoning questions they may be asked.

 

As test day gets closer, consider doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

Our 11 Plus practice tests can help your child to prepare for Ermysted’s exam; we would recommend the following:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning Pack 1 (GL-style)

 

The information provided about Ermysted’s Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Dover Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus website

Initially founded in 1904 as Dover County School, Dover Grammar School for Girls was established in 1910. The school educates over 700 pupils, primarily girls aged 11 to 18, although the school’s Sixth Form does admit boys from ages 16 to 18.

 

Since 1910, pupils have been split into four houses: Hubert de Burgh, St Martin, Queen Ethelburga, and Stephen de Pencester. The school prides itself on offering a broad range of extracurricular activities, including art, sports and drama clubs.

 

For a brief insight into academic life at Dover Grammar School for Girls, watch this promotional video:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Dover Grammar School for Girls

 

 

Address: Dover Grammar School for Girls, Frith Road, Dover CT16 2PZ

County: Kent

Admissions Info: enquiries@dggs.kent.sch.uk, 01304 206 625

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 789 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test or the Dover Test

 

Dover Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Prospective pupils have the choice of sitting either the Dover Test or the Kent Test at 11 Plus. Students must take at least one of these tests in order to be considered for a Year 7 place, although many opt to take both. Before registering your daughter, it is advised that both parents and students visit the school on one of its open events in June. At these events, school staff will answer any questions you may have regarding the school’s admissions process.

 

In recent years, the ratio of applicants to Year 7 places at Dover Grammar School for Girls has been 3:1. When the number of applicants exceeds the spaces available, places will be allocated in the following order of priority:

 

  • Children in Local Authority Care, or previously in Local Authority Care
  • Children with a sibling already attending the school
  • Medical, health, social and special access reasons
  • Children in receipt of Pupil Premium
  • Nearness of children’s homes to school

 

Find out more about the school’s Year 7 admissions process.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Dover Grammar School for Girls

 

 

Parents of students who wish to register their daughter to sit the entrance tests must register with the school before the exam date. To register for the Kent Test, you must complete an online registration form. Application forms to sit the Dover Test can be found on the school’s website. Please note: for the Dover Test, the school will not accept any late applications.

 

Once your daughter has sat the Kent Test at 11+, parents must complete the Secondary Common Application Form and submit it to Kent County Council. This process can usually be done online.

 

If you have any further queries about Dover Grammar School for Girls’ admissions process at Year 7, call the school on 01304 206 625 or email enquiries@dggs.kent.sch.uk.

 

Dover Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Dover Grammar School for Girls uses both the Kent 11 Plus exam and the Dover Test.

 

The Kent Exam consists of Reasoning, English and Maths, as well as a writing task. The exam takes the following format:

 

  1. An hour-long, multiple-choice exam that tests a pupil’s reasoning abilities. Girls will be tested on Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Spatial Reasoning.
  2. An hour-long, multiple-choice exam that tests English and Maths. Each question will have 5 answer choices and your child will need to mark their responses on a separate answer sheet.
  3. A writing task that lasts for 40 minutes, including 10 minutes’ preparation time. This task isn’t marked for the purposes of the 11 Plus exam but may be used as evidence for borderline or appeal cases.

 

Would you like to learn more about the Kent Test? This article explains everything you need to know.

 

The Dover Test covers Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning and also tests at the Key Stage 2 National Curriculum Maths and English level.

 

How to Prepare for the Dover Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Kent is the largest and most competitive grammar school area in England, with 35 selective schools. Therefore, it’s important that both you and your child understand the 11 Plus process. It is vital to maximise the time and resources available to your child in the lead-up to the test. With a strong revision strategy, your child will be better placed to tackle both the Kent and Dover tests.

 

If you’re unsure of your child’s current ability, practice exam papers are a good way of establishing their strengths and weaknesses. It’s vital to introduce this type of practice into your child’s 11 Plus study routine and it allows you to closely monitor their progress.

 

Pupils sitting The Kent Test, with a view of gaining a Year 7 place at Dover Grammar School for Girls, will benefit from these resources:

 

 

These practice tests cover every aspect of the exam including Mathematics, English and Reasoning, making them ideal for your daughter.

 

Additional revision for specific subjects can be found in the following practice exam papers:

 

 

 

The information provided about Dover Grammar School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Dover Grammar School for Boys website

A selective secondary school, Dover Grammar School for Boys was founded in 1905 and educates over 700 boys aged 11 to 18, although it does accept girls into its sixth form. In 2010, the school achieved an ‘Outstanding’ rating by Ofsted and has been awarded an International Schools Award due to its close links with other schools around the world.

 

A community-minded school, Dover Grammar School for Boys is also home to a successful Combined Cadet Force, which is open to pupils from Year 8 upwards from the surrounding area of Kent.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Dover Grammar School for Boys

 

 

Address: Dover Grammar School for Boys, Astor Avenue, Dover CT17 0DQ

County: Kent

Admissions Info: office@dgsg.co.uk, 01304 206117

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 758 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test (GL) or Dover Grammar School Test

 

 

Dover Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to Dover Grammar School for Boys in Year 7 is based on pupil performance in the Kent Test, or the school’s own entrance test. Before parents commit to registering their son, the school recommends attending one of its open events. This will give you a better idea as to whether or not your son would be suited to a grammar school education.

 

Dover Grammar School for Boys has a maximum of 120 places allocated in Year 7. In case of oversubscription, the school gives priority to:

 

  • Children in Local Authority Care
  • Children with a sibling already attending the school at the time of entry
  • Medical, health and special access reasons
  • Children who live close to the school (and can prove it is their permanent home)

 

Visit the school’s website for more information about its admissions process in Year 7.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Dover Grammar School for Boys

 

 

In the first instance, parents should complete and submit separate registration forms for the Kent Test and/or the Dover Boys Test. Your son’s current primary school can help you register for the Kent Test, or you can refer to Kent County Council’s website.

 

For the Dover Boys Test, an application form can be found via the school’s website. Once your son has taken the entrance exam, an application needs to be made through your local authority’s application system (a Secondary Common Application Form). In most cases, applications can be made online through your local authority’s website.

 

More details about the registration process are available by emailing the school at office@dgsg.co.uk or calling the main office on 01304 206117.

 

 

Dover Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Kent has its own 11 Plus exam, the Kent Test, which is used to allocate Year 7 places. Dover Grammar School for Boys also has the Dover Test. It is not necessary for pupils to take both exams.

 

The Kent Test’s format is as follows:

 

  1. Reasoning: A one-hour exam that tests students’ reasoning abilities, split into multiple sections. These sections covers Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.
  2. English and Maths: A one-hour exam, split into two sections. The English section tests comprehension and literacy skills, while the multiple-choice maths section covers a range of topics, including arithmetic.
  3. Writing: This 40-minute task is not marked as part of the 11 Plus exam, but can be referred to during an appeal case.

 

The Dover Test covers similar topics, including Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning and also tests at Key Stage 2 National Curriculum maths and English level.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Dover Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Even though your son can take two different tests to try and gain a place at Dover Grammar School for Boys, that needn’t mean twice the stress. In fact, creating a stress-free environment for him in the run-up to his exam is important – and achievable. It’s important to keep motivation levels high, so use revision time as an opportunity to play learning games with your child. Make sure your son is working on topics that he struggles with rather than repeating ones he already knows; this is a more efficient use of time.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’re experts in exam preparation. We have devised online practice papers specific to the Kent 11 Plus Test. These tests have been created by assessment experts and fully replicate the actual exam format and structure. To gain one of the 120 Year 7 places at Dover Grammar School for Boys, your son must show skill in several areas. These tests will allow him to build his confidence and improve his overall performance as the exam date draws closer.

 

If your son is taking the Kent 11 Plus Test, we would fully recommend the following practice papers to begin with:

 

 

If your child requires further practice in a particular subject area ahead of the exam, you can choose also from the following:

 

The information provided about Dover Grammar School for Boys was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Devonport High School for Girls website

Located in Plymouth, Devonport High School for Girls (DHSG) teaches over 800 girls aged 11 to 18. A selective girls’ state grammar school, it gained academy status in 2011. Due to funding received through its Specialist Language College status in 2005, DHSG updated its facilities to include first-rate computer rooms, language laboratories and a contemporary library.

 

Pupils consistently produce excellent exam results and the school is noted for the significant progress students make through to GCSE level.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Devonport High School for Girls

 

 

Address: Devonport High School for Girls, Lyndhurst Road, Peverell, Plymouth PL2 3DL

County: Devon

Admissions Info: secondary.admissions@plymouth.gov.uk, 01752 307469

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 810 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Devonport High School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Application for admission to Devonport High School for Girls is made through Plymouth City Council and all prospective Year 7 pupils must take the 11 Plus exam in September before the year of entry. Each of the 120 places available at DHSG are dealt with by the local authority and parents must apply for a school place via the Council’s website.

 

You can find more details about DHSG’s admissions process via the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Devonport High School for Girls

 

 

To gain a Year 7 place at DHSG, all prospective pupils must take the 11 Plus exam. You can register your daughter via this online registration form.

 

Girls will sit the 11 Plus tests in September and parents will receive results in mid-October. Places will be allocated in early March and parents must respond to this allocation within two weeks. It is expected that all grammar school places for DHSG will be filled within one allocation round; late applications won’t be included in the first round of allocations.

 

Devonport High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus exam at Devonport High School is split into three papers:

 

  1. Multiple-choice English
  2. Written English
  3. Multiple-choice maths

 

While results from both multiple-choice GL Assessment papers are marked, the written English comprehension test set by the school does not count toward a pupil’s final assessed mark and tends to be considered in appeal cases only.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Devonport High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

With its consistently strong exam results and first class pastoral care for pupils, Devonport High School for Girls is considered one of the best selective schools in Devon. This means competition Year 7 entry is high and your daughter will have to perform well in all 11 Plus exams to be in with a chance of securing a place.

 

The key to effectice 11 Plus exam preparation is regular revision and testing, little and often. Once you have established a revision routine with your child, gradually introduce them to questions similar to those that they may be asked in the exams. Practice exam papers can go a long way in improving a child’s performance at 11 Plus level, as they will already be comfortable with the structure ahead of the exam itself.

 

To give your child the best opportunity of securing a Year 7 place at Devonport High School for Girls, we can recommend the following 11+ practice tests, which have been specifically designed with the Devonport 11 plus exam in mind:

 

11+ English Pack 1 (GL)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL)

11+ English Pack 3 (GL)

11+ English Spelling Pack

11+ Mathematics Pack 1 (GL)

11+ Mathematics Pack 2 (GL)

 

The information provided about Devonport High School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Devonport High School for Boys website

Devonport High School for Boys (DHSB) is located in Plymouth and is a boys’ grammar that educates approximately 1,135 pupils. Founded in 1896, the school admits pupils aged between 11 and 18. In 2002, it was one of just four schools in England to be designated as a specialist engineering college. In 2007, Devonport was awarded High Performing Secondary Schools status for its language specialisms and Applied Learning. The school became an academy in 2011. Pupils are split between six houses: Campbell, Edison, Newton, Priestley, Smeaton and Winstanley.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Devonport High School for Boys

 

 

Address: Devonport High School for Boys, Paradise Road, Stoke, Plymouth PL1 5QP

County: Devon

Admissions Info: sarah.nicholson@dhsb.org, 01752 208787

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,135 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Devonport High School for Boys 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Devonport High School for Boys currently admits 180 pupils in Year 7. Admission to the school at this stage is determined by each pupil’s performance in the 11 Plus exam. Due to a wide catchment area that extends well beyond Plymouth, the school is very popular for Year 7 applications and so parents are advised to attend one of the school’s open days. At the event, you’ll have the opportunity to hear from the school’s headteacher and learn more about the admissions process.

 

Should the school be oversubscribed for Year 7 places, it uses the following criteria in order of priority:

 

  1. Pupils who are, or have previously been, in looked-after care.
  2. Pupils in receipt of the pupil or service premium at the date of testing
  3. Children of a member of staff who has been employed at the school for two or more years or children whose parents work at the school.
  4. The student’s mark in the English paper.
  5. Distance from the school, with those living closer to DHSB given priority.

 

Get more information about Devonport High School for Boys’ Year 7 admissions process.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Devonport High School for Boys

 

 

Parents who wish to register their son to sit the entrance tests need to register with the school before the September exam dates. In the first instance, parents need to complete this online registration form.

 

Prospective DHSB pupils will sit the entrance exams over two dates in September and parents will receive results in mid-October. The results of the examination don’t confirm that a place will be offered; offer letters will be issued in March the following year and only then will you know if your child has been successful in gaining a place at DHSB.

 

Devonport High School for Boys 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Devonport High School for Boys’ 11 Plus exam consists of three tests:

 

  • English
  • Mathematics
  • Creative writing paper, set by the school

 

The English and maths papers are both multiple choice, while the 40-minute Creative writing paper requires pupils to plan and write a piece of descriptive text. Pupils will be marked on sentence structure, punctuation, composition, spelling and vocabulary.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Devonport High School for Boys 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Preparation for the Devonport High School for Boys’ 11 Plus exams needn’t be stressful. All you need is good organisation and the right resources. If you’re feeling overwhelmed by the amount of 11 Plus advice online, then have a read our 11 Plus guide for parents – it’s a great place to start!

 

As DHSB’s 11 Plus exams focus on maths and English, we would also recommend taking a look at these articles:

 

Use the run-up to the exams as an opportunity to test your child with practice papers. An understanding of the exam layout and structure is vital if your son is going to feel comfortable under exam conditions.

For Devonport High School for Boys’ 11 Plus, we would recommend the following practice resources for your son:

 

11+ Mathematics Pack 1 (GL)

11+ Mathematics Pack 2 (GL)

11+ Problem Solving (GL)

11+ English Pack 1 (GL)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL)

11+ English Pack 3 (GL)

11+ English Spelling

 

The information provided about Devonport High School for Boys was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Dartford Grammar School for Girls website

Established in 1904, Dartford Grammar School for Girls admits girls aged 11-18. Previously known as Dartford County, approximately 1,000 students currently attend this Kent-based school.

 

A grant-maintained school, in 2008 Dartford was reaccredited as a science specialist school. It is a high-performing grammar and is one of Dartford’s top performing state schools.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Dartford Grammar School for Girls

 

 

Address: Dartford Grammar School for Girls, Shepherds Lane, Dartford DA1 2NT

County: Kent

Admissions Info: school@dartfordgrammargirls.kent.sch.uk, 01322 223123

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,064 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

 

Dartford Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

To be considered for a Year 7 place at Dartford Grammar School for Girls, pupils must sit the Kent 11 Plus Test. The test exists to assess whether grammar school is a suitable option for your child.

 

With 180 Year 7 places available, Dartford Grammar School for Girls is often over-subscribed. In such cases the school uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

  • Children in Local Authority Care
  • Pupils who are eligible for free school meals
  • Students who already have a sibling at the school
  • Students who live closest to the school (100 places allocated here)

 

The parents of students who are not awarded a Grammar School place can appeal the decision in front of an Independent Appeals Panel.

 

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Dartford Grammar School for Girls

 

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to the school, parents need to register their child online with the Kent Local Authority (LA), or request a paper registration form by contacting the Secondary Admissions Team at Kent LA.

 

Test results will be posted out in mid-October and parents can also view the results online. For more information about Dartford Grammar School for Girls’ registration process at the 11 Plus stage, email school@dartfordgrammargirls.kent.sch.uk or call 01322 223123.

 

 

Dartford Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Along with the majority of Kent-based selective schools, Dartford Grammar for Girls requires pupils to take the Kent 11 Plus exam, which consists of two multiple-choice tests with a separate answer sheet.

 

The first test is one hour long and is split into two sections, English and Maths. Each section consists of a 5-minute practice exercise and a 25-minute test.

 

The second test is a reasoning paper and is split into three sections:

 

The Verbal Reasoning section is 30 minutes long, including a 10 minute practice section. The Non-Verbal and Spatial Reasoning tests are each around 15 minutes long, including practice sections.

 

Prospective pupils are also required to sit a 40-minute writing task. Although this isn’t marked as part of the 11+ exam, it could be used in appeal cases, borderline cases or at a Headteacher’s request.

 

You can see some sample questions for the Kent 11 Plus Exam here.

 

 

How to Prepare for the Dartford Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

The Kent Test varies from year to year, but children are still able to maximise their potential in the exam through good preparation. When to begin preparation will depend on your child’s current attainment, but with a set revision plan, all children will benefit from regular practice sessions.

 

For the Dartford Grammar School for Girls 11+ test, a good place to start is with practice exam papers. This not only gives pupils an idea of the types of questions they can expect in the real exam, but can provide parents with a good indication of their child’s current abilities.

 

Gaining a Year 7 place at a Kent-based school isn’t always easy. We have designed two practice tests specifically for the Kent Test:

 

 

Once your child has completed these, you might notice gaps in their knowledge, or that they aren’t as strong in a particular subject area. If this the case, you can choose the most appropriate subject-specific resource pack to help strengthen their individual subject knowledge:

 

 

The information provided about Dartford Grammar School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

reenshot of the Dane Court Grammar School website

Established in 1957 as a Technical High School, Dane Court is a co-educational grammar located in the coastal town of Broadstairs in Kent. Open to 1,200 pupils aged 11 to 18, it received academy status in 2011.

 

Dane Court became a Specialist Language College in 2003 and has since invested a significant amount of resources into promoting languages within its community. Pupils are divided into six houses, with 300 of those sitting within the school’s sixth form.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Dane Court Grammar School

 

 

Address: Dane Court Grammar School, Broadstairs Road, Broadstairs, CT10 2RT

County: Kent

Admissions Info: admin@danecourt.kent.sch.uk, 01843 864941

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1202 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 165

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

 

Dane Court Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to Dane Court Grammar School is determined by student performance in the Kent 11 Plus Test. The school has 165 Year 7 places available, but the school is consistently (and heavily) oversubscribed. In cases where the number of applicants is greater than the spaces available at the school, Dane Court Grammar School uses the following oversubscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Children who are presently or were previously in Local Authority Care
  • Medical/health and special access reasons
  • Students who already have a sibling at the school
  • Students who live closest to the school

 

The parents of students who are not awarded a place can appeal the decision in front of an Independent Appeals Panel. Specific details of the appeals process are usually sent to parents at the same time as the offer letter.

 

If you would like to appeal a Grammar School decision, take a look at this useful article that explains the process for parents or guardians.

 

More information about Dane Court Grammar School’s admissions criteria is available on the school’s website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Dane Court Grammar School

 

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Dane Court Grammar School, parents must complete a registration form by July prior to the year of entry and a Common Application Form (CAF). More details about Dane Court’s registration process are available by contacting the school directly on 01843 864 941, or by emailing admin@danecourt.kent.sch.uk.

 

Dane Court Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Pupils wishing to attend Dane Court Grammar School from Year 7 must take and pass the Kent 11 Plus exam. The tests cover English, maths and reasoning and also a writing task. The exam is used to assess whether your child is suitable for entry to the school and the format is used by the majority of the 35 wholly selective and 4 partially selective grammar schools in the Kent region.

 

The Kent 11+ exam format is:

 

  • Section 1: A one hour exam that tests English and maths. Both topics have a 5 minute practice exercise and a 25 minute test
  • Section 2: A one hour exam that tests students’ reasoning abilities. The test is split into three sections: Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Spatial Reasoning

 

Learn more about the Kent 11+ Test, including sample questions, here.

 

How to Prepare for the Dane Court Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

Exam revision can be a fraught period for both children and their parents, particularly if preparation is left until the last minute. With only one chance to impress at the 11 Plus stage, Exam Papers Plus offers a complete solution to exam preparation. With our online practice papers, you can give your child the edge over the competition in the Kent 11 Plus exam and maximise their chances of gaining a much-coveted place at Dane Court Grammar School.

 

Starting your child’s revision plan early can ensure that they aren’t overwhelmed with new information as the exam date draws closer. Thorough preparation also means you’re well aware of any weak areas that require additional work in the lead up to the exam.

 

Competition for Year 7 places at Dane Court Grammar School is fierce, so we would recommend taking a look at these resources that have been specifically designed for the Kent Test:

 

 

If your child needs additional practice in a particular subject area, we would recommend the following practice packs:

 

 

The information provided about Dane Court Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Dartford Grammar School website

Dartford Grammar School is a selective school for boys aged 11-18. Located in Kent, the school educates approximately 1200 pupils and admits girls into its sixth form. Founded in 1576, Dartford Grammar is one of the oldest schools in England. Rated as ‘Outstanding’ by Ofsted, in 2011 the school gained academy status and pupils consistently achieve excellent exam results.

 

For a brief insight into academic life at Dartford Grammar School watch this promotional video:

 

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Dartford Grammar School

 

Address: Dartford Grammar School, West Hill, Dartford DA1 2HW

County: Kent

Admissions Info: admissions@dartfordgrammarschool.org.uk, 01322 223039

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1203 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

Dartford Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Year 7 admission to Dartford Grammar School is determined by pupil performance in the Kent 11+ exam. There are currently 180 places allocated to Year 7 students. The school encourages prospective students and their parents to attend one of their open mornings, which take place in June. Staff provide guided tours and the Headmaster will give a short speech to each group.

 

In case of oversubscription, Dartford Grammar School gives priority to:

 

  • Children who are or were in Local Authority Care
  • Students who live closest to the school (90 places allocated)

 

The remaining 90 places are available to all applicants regardless of their address. Visit Dartford Grammar School’s website for more information about its admissions policy.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Dartford Grammar School

 

To apply for a Year 7 place at Dartford Grammar School, parents must first register their child for the Kent Test and Common Application Form (CAF). More details about the registration process are available by contacting the school on 01322 223039, or by emailing admissions@dartfordgrammarschool.org.uk.

 

Dartford Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Kent is home to 35 wholly selective grammar schools and 4 partially selective schools, the majority of which use the Kent Test at 11 Plus level to allocate Year 7 places. The exam includes tests in Reasoning, English and Maths and also includes a writing task.

 

Take a look at this breakdown of the exam format:

 

Section 1Reasoning: A one-hour exam that tests students’ reasoning abilities. The test is broken down into three shorter sections and focuses on Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.

 

Section 2 – English and Maths: A one-hour exam that is split into two sections. Each section has a 5-minute practice exercise and 25 minute test. The English section will test comprehension and literacy skills, while the Maths section will contain multiple choice questions covering a range of topics that pupils will have covered up to Year 6.

 

Section 3 – Writing: This 40-minute writing task will not be marked as part of the 11 Plus exam, but might be used in borderline cases, or by headteachers during the place allocation stage.

 

How to Prepare for the Dartford Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

To give your child the best possible chance of gaining a place at Dartford Grammar School, it’s worth establishing a positive revision plan with them. Regular revision, little and often, will give them a better chance of improving their exam technique, increasing their subject knowledge and learning how to perform well under exam conditions.

 

Show your child that you have a real interest in their academic progress by choosing from our selection of online practice papers. We’d highly recommend the following resources, both of which have been produced specifically with the Kent Test in mind:

 

 

Additionally, if your child requires further practice in a particular subject area ahead of the exam, you can choose from the following selection of papers that are designed to strengthen individual subject knowledge:

 

 

Have you left your Dartford Grammar School 11 Plus exam preparation a little late? Don’t worry, take a look at our post Last Minute Preparation Tips for the 11 Plus Exam.

 

The information provided about Dartford Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Crossley Heath Grammar School website

Crossley Heath Grammar School is a co-educational grammar located in West Yorkshire’s Halifax. The school currently educates over 1100 pupils across years 7 – 13. The school was founded in 1985, when two previous schools joined together – Crossley and Porter School and Heath Grammar School. In 2003, the school became a Specialist Language College and then became an academy in 2013.

 

Pupils are divided into four houses: Kings, Porter, Queens and Savile. Across the academic year, houses compete with each other in a variety of events and competitions.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Crossley Heath Grammar School

 

 

Address: Crossley Heath Grammar School Savile Park, Halifax, HX3 0HG

County: Yorkshire

Admissions Info: admin@crossleyheath.org.uk, 01422 360272

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1116 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: Late September or early October

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment for Verbal Reasoning, Maths and English papers are created by the school themselves

 

Crossley Heath Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Crossley Heath Grammar School complies with Calderdale Council’s admissions process in Yorkshire. In order to be considered for a place at the school in Year 7, pupils must pass the 11 Plus exam. Crossley Heath currently admits 180 new Year 7 students per school year.

 

The grammar school encourages prospective pupils and parents to attend its Open Evening, which takes place in June. At the event, school staff will provide additional information about the admissions process and visitors will also have the opportunity to ask questions.

 

Get more information on Crossley Heath Grammar School’s admission criteria.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Crossley Heath Grammar School

 

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Crossley Heath Grammar School, parents must register their child via the school’s online application form. If students meet the required criteria, they can take the school entrance test in September. Parents will receive the results from the admissions test in mid-October. Please note: not all pupils who perform well in the test will be guaranteed a place at the school. If a pupil has been offered a place at Crossley Heath Grammar School, parents must submit the Online Common Application Form (CAF) to Calderdale Local Authority by late October and include the school as one of their five preferences to be considered for a place.

 

Crossley Heath Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

Crossley Heath Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of three tests, covering:

 

  1. English
  2. Mathematics
  3. Verbal Reasoning

 

The English paper lasts an hour and is split into two sections: reading and writing. Unusually for a grammar school exam, the English test contains a mix of multiple-choice and open answer questions. The maths test consists of 40 questions in multiple choice format and lasts for 30 minutes, while the 30-minute verbal reasoning paper consists of 50 multiple choice questions.

 

How to Prepare for the Crossley Heath Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

In order to maximise your child’s chances of success in the 11 Plus exam, both you and your child need to be organised. The more time you put into thorough preparation, the lower your stress levels will be as the exam date approaches. As a starting point, review our 11 Plus guide for parents, which will give you an overview of the exam and what to expect from the process from start to finish.

 

 

Crossley Heath Grammar School tends to be oversubscribed for Year 7 places, so it’s a good idea to start your child early with their revision to ensure they have plenty of time to work on their weaker subject areas. Practice test papers are an ideal way of preparing your child for the 11 Plus exam at Crossley Heath. Not only will the papers help familiarise your child with the layout of the exam, but will help to improve a their time management skills and teach them how to perform to the best of their ability in an exam environment.

 

For the Crossley Heath Grammar School 11+ exam, we would specifically recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Crossley Heath Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Colyton Grammar School website

Colyton Grammar School, known locally as ‘CGS’, was founded in 1546. Located in Colyford, in East Devon, the school is co-educational and teaches students aged from 11 to 18. The school has a reputation for producing good exam results and has been classified as ‘Outstanding’ by OFSTED three years running. In 2011, the school became an academy, having previously been maintained by Devon County Council. Colyton Grammar School is also part of the South West Academic Trust, alongside other selective schools across the South West of England. The trust exists to share best practice.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to study at Colyton Grammar, take a look at this video created by the school.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Colyton Grammar School

 

Address: Colyton Grammar School, Whitwell Lane, Colyford, Colyton, EX24 6HN

County: Devon

Admissions Info: admin@colytongrammar.devon.sch.uk, 01297 552327

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 806 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 120

Open Day Dates: April, July and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

Colyton Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Entry to Colyton Grammar in Year 7 is determined by student performance in the 11 Plus exam. Candidates who achieve eligible scores are ranked based on performance, with the top students being shortlisted for entry. Although the admission criteria varies from school to school across Devon, each requires parents to complete a Common Application Form (CAF), where they can express interest in at least three schools. Colyton Grammar must be named on the CAF in order for students to be considered for a place.

 

In cases where there are more eligible applicants than places available, the school uses the following over-subscription criteria to determine priority:

 

  1. Looked After Children or children, who have previously been in looked after care.
  2. Students who are eligible for Pupil Premium.
  3. Children of staff members.
  4. Rank order of the total score in the 11 Plus tests.
  5. Pupil distance from school.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Colyton Grammar School

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to Colyton Grammar School, parents need to register their child online. The registration form can be accessed here. The form is used to double-check that students meet all the necessary admission criteria to attend the Test Day. Late registrations may still be considered under exceptional circumstances, such as illness etc.

 

Colyton Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The entrance exam consists of two papers that last approximately 50 minutes each. Both are multiple choice and split into various timed sections with a break between the two tests.

 

The exam tests:

 

  • Verbal ability (verbal reasoning, vocabulary, comprehension)
  • Non-verbal ability (shapes and objects).
  • Numerical ability (maths and problem solving)

There will also be an additional English paper, which lasts for 20 minutes. The paper normally tests creative writing ability and is marked separately by the school.

 

How to Prepare for the Colyton Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The Colyton Grammar School 11 Plus exam is set by CEM and is multiple choice. Our similarly-styled multiple choice practice papers can really help students get used to the style and format of the actual exam.

 

There are many benefits to preparing for the entrance test with practice test papers, as schools often don’t do preparation in class. Practice papers can help familiarise students with the layout of the 11 Plus exam and get them used to answering the types of questions that may come up on the day. As the exam approaches, doing timed practice papers can also help improve time management skills.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources to prepare for the Colyton Eleven Plus exam:

 

 

The information provided about Colyton Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Churston Ferrers Grammar School website

Churston Ferrers Grammar School (CFGS) is a co-educational grammar school located in Torbay, in South Devon. A selective school, CFGS has academy status and is a Specialist Humanities College. The school consistently performs well in exam league tables and in previous years has been ranked as ‘outstanding’ by OFSTED. In 2016, the school’s Modern Foreign Languages block was remodelled to create a new section for the Art and Music departments. Students are split into year groups and subdivided into houses, which are managed by form tutors.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Churston Ferrers Grammar School

 

Address: Churston Ferrers Grammar School, Greenway Road, Brixham, TQ5 0LN

County: Devon

Admissions Info: secretary@churston.torbay.sch.uk, 01803 842289

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 931 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 130

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

Churston Ferrers Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

 

Admission to the school is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. Churston Ferrers Grammar School is part of the South Devon Schools Consortium, so the entrance test is the same one used by all the selective schools in Torbay. Parents need to register their child to take the tests and the school recommends that students sit the exam at Churston Ferrers to help familiarise them with the building and staff.

 

Each year, the school has an Open Day and welcomes students and parents to take a tour of the school and meet the staff and students. The Head Teacher gives a presentation and provides more information about the 11 Plus process. There is also the opportunity to observe lessons to provide students with an insight into what it’s like to study at the school.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Churston Ferrers Grammar School

 

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Churston Ferrers Grammar School, parents need to register their child by completing the school’s application form, which can be found online, here. Additionally, parents need to complete the Common Application Form (CAF) and list CFGS as one of three preferred schools.

 

Once the exam has been taken, parents will receive a guidance letter, which provides an indication of their child’s performance and whether they’d be eligible for entry to a selective school. It should be noted that the letter won’t provide test scores and isn’t a guarantee of a school place as offers won’t be made until later.

 

Churston Ferrers Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Churston Ferrer 11 Plus exam aims to reflect the syllabus being taught at primary school in accordance with the Year 5 National Curriculum. There is only one stage of testing, which means that student test scores will be the principal consideration for admission to the school.

 

There will be two test papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes. The questions will be in multiple choice format and split into several timed sections. The elements that will be tested are:

 

  • Verbal ability (vocabulary, verbal reasoning, comprehension)
  • Non-Verbal ability (shapes and objects)
  • Numerical abi
  • lity (maths problems)
  • English Writing

 

The English writing test focuses on creative writing and lasts approximately 20 minutes. Students will be given a choice of topics to write on and will be asked to present the subject in a specific way. For example, they may be asked to write persuasively, or to create a fictional story.

How to Prepare for the Churston Ferrers Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

Preparing for the 11 Plus requires good organisation. The sooner your child starts revising, the more time they’ll have to improve their knowledge and exam technique. It’s a good idea to create a study timetable with your child to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know for the tests.

 

Introducing practice exam papers early can also provide a good indication of their current strengths and weaknesses. Once you know which areas need improving, you can tailor your child’s study schedule to suit.

 

Not only do exam practice papers help familiarise students with the layout of the exam, but they help them get used to the types of questions they may be asked on the day. As the exam approaches, we’d recommend having your child do timed practice papers under exam conditions. This can help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions quickly and under pressure.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Churston Ferrers Grammar School 11+ exam:

 

 

The information provided about Churston Ferrers Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Clitheroe Royal Grammar School website

Clitheroe Royal Grammar School was founded in 1554. Located in Clitheroe, in Lancashire, the school is co-educational and was formerly an all-boys school. In 1991, the school became a Grant Maintained School before becoming a Foundation School a few years later in 1998. In recent years, Clitheroe Royal Grammar has converted to Academy status. The school has a student council and also has Language College status.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Clitheroe Royal Grammar School

 

Address: Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, Chatburn Road, Clitheroe, BB7 2BA

County: Lancashire

Admissions Info: mainschool@crgs.org.uk, 01200 423379

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1263 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 120

Open Day Date: September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Clitheroe Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Clitheroe Royal Grammar School complies with the admission criteria as set out by the Lancashire Co-ordinated Scheme for secondary schools. Entry to the school is determined by student performance in the 11 Plus exam.

 

The grammar school website provides some introductory information about the admission process and encourages prospective students and parents to attend their Open Evening, which takes place in September.

 

More information about admission to the school is provided at the event where students and parents will have the opportunity to meet staff and tour the school grounds.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Clitheroe Royal Grammar School

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to Clitheroe Royal Grammar School, parents need to register their child by completing an online application form, which can be accessed here. If students meet the criteria, they can then take the school entrance test. However, it should be noted that good performance in the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of a place at the school.

 

In cases where there are more suitable candidates than Year 7 places, the school uses its oversubscription criteria to determine priority as follows:

 

  1. Looked after children, or children who have previously been in looked after care
  2. Students who live in the school’s catchment area and meet the required standard
  3. Students who live outside the catchment area and meet the required standard

 

Clitheroe Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Clitheroe Royal Grammar School 11 Plus exam consist of three tests in:

 

  1. Maths
  2. English
  3. Verbal Reasoning

 

The Maths test consists of 50 questions in multiple choice format and lasts for 50 minutes. The Verbal Reasoning test has 80 multiple choice questions in 50 minutes and the English paper has 56 multiple choice questions that last for 45 minutes. There are two sections to the English test – one that tests spelling, punctuation and grammar, and one that requires students to read an extract of text and then answer questions about the passage.

 

How to Prepare for the Clitheroe Royal Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

When it comes to preparing for the 11 Plus exam, it’s best to start early. The more time your child has to improve their knowledge and refine their exam technique, the more prepared they’ll feel leading up to the big day.

 

We recommend creating a study timetable with your child to ensure that they cover all the elements of the exam. It’s also a good idea to introduce practice exam papers early in their revision so you can see where their strengths and weaknesses lie.

 

Not only do practice exam papers help familiarise students with the layout of the exam, but they get them used to the types of questions they’ll likely be asked on the day of the tests. As exam day approaches, we recommend having your child do timed practice papers under test conditions to get them used to answering questions under pressure.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Clitheroe Royal Grammar School 11+ exam:

 

 

The information provided about Clitheroe Royal Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School website

Founded in 1931as Sidcup County School for Boys, Chislehurst and Sidcup Grammar School (as it’s now known) is a co-educational grammar school for students aged between 11 and 18. Located in Bexley, London, the school has a reputation for producing good exam results. Students are split into one of five houses: Williams, Townshend, Lester, Edlemann and Davies. There is also a Staff house for school employees. The school produces an annual magazine called The Chronicle, which is organised by its pupils.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to study at Chis & Sid, check out this ‘day in the life’ video produced by students of the school:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School

 

Address: Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School, Hurst Road, Sidcup, DA15 9AG

County: Bexley

Admissions Info: enquiries@csgrammar.com, 020 8302 6511

School Type: Co-educational Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,330 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: Approximately 190

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School is part of the Bexley Co-ordinated Secondary School Admissions Scheme and only students who pass the Bexley test can be considered for admission in Year 7.

 

The Bexley test aims to select the top academic students for entrance to the school with pass marks set by a selection panel of headteacher and officers. In order to be eligible for consideration, students need to produce test scores within the top 180 candidates. However, it should be noted that passing the Bexley 11 Plus isn’t a guarantee of a Year 7 place.

 

In cases where there are more eligible candidates than Year 7 places, the school uses its over subscription criteria to determine pupil priority. More information about the school’s over-subscription and admissions policies can be found here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar, parents need to complete the school’s admission pack, which can be downloaded from the school website here, alongside information booklets about the school and its open day.

 

Every child that attends a primary school in Bexley will be invited to sit the 11 Plus exam in September. The tests will either take place at the pupil’s primary school, or at an independent testing centre

 

In order to confirm registration, parents need to send all relevant documentation to the school office. More information on what documents are needed can be found in the admission pack.

 

Completed packs should be returned by post to:

 

Mrs N Sayell

Office Manager (Admissions)

Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School

Hurst Road

Sidcup

Kent

DA15 9AG

 

Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of two test papers that last around 50 minutes each. The two tests cover the following elements:

 

  • Verbal ability
  • Numerical reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning

 

Each test contains a mixture of standard format and multiple choice questions, divided into timed sections.

 

How to Prepare for the Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

When it comes to preparing for the 11 Plus exam, it really helps to be organised. The more time your child has to study for the tests, the better chance they’ll have of performing well. It’s a good idea to create a study timetable with your child that maps out what days they’ll study and what topics they’ll cover. Preparation for the 11 Plus usually begins several months in advance of the exam, so the sooner your child starts revising, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas.

 

In addition to working from a structured plan, we recommend using practice exam papers early in your child’s revision. Not only do practice tests help identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses but they help familiarise students with the layout of the exam and the types of questions they may be asked on the day.

 

In the lead up to the tests, we’d recommend having your child sit practice exam papers under exam conditions so that they get used to answering questions quickly and under pressure.  Practice papers can also help improve time management skills.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School 11+ exam:

 

 

The information provided about Chislehurst & Sidcup Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Chesham Grammar School

Chesham Grammar School was founded in 1947. Located in White Hill, Chesham, the school is co-educational and welcomes students aged between 11 and 18. Chesham Grammar has Academy, Specialist and Humanities College status. The school consistently produces good exam results and in previous years has been rated as outstanding by OFSTED. In 2015, the school was ranked 37th in the list of the best schools in the country at GCSE level. Chesham Grammar also has a good record of pupils gaining places on the Prime Minister’s Fellowship programme.

11 Plus Exam Information for Chesham Grammar School

 

Address: Chesham Grammar School, White Hill, Chesham, Bucks, HP5 1BA

County: Buckinghamshire

Admissions Info: office@cheshamgrammar.org, 01494 782854

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,251 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham)

 

Chesham Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Chesham Grammar School is part of the Buckinghamshire Co-ordinated Admissions Scheme and follows their process for Year 7 admissions. Bucks County Council produces a ‘Transfer Testing Process’ leaflet and a ‘How to Register’ guide that provides more information on the admission process.

 

Bucks County Council also sends out information about the 11 Plus to their primary schools, which provides details on the testing process. Parents who live outside of Buckinghamshire can still apply for their child to sit the Bucks 11 Plus exam by registering at an earlier date. For more information on early registration, you can contact Bucks council directly.

 

In order to be considered for a place at Chesham Grammar School, students need to meet the required qualifying score in the 11 Plus exam, which has been set at 121 by an independent review panel.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Chesham Grammar School

 

Pupils who attend a primary school in Buckinghamshire are automatically registered for the 11 Plus exam, unless parents request for their child to be withdrawn from the process. Parents from outside of Buckinghamshire can still register their child by contacting Buckinghamshire County Council directly.

 

The school also hosts open evenings in September for prospective students and parents, where you’ll have the chance to meet the school staff and ask any questions about admission.

 

Chesham Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Chesham Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of two tests that each last approximately 50 minutes. The tests assess:

 

  • Verbal reasoning ability (including comprehension and cloze)
  • Non-verbal reasoning ability
  • Numerical ability

 

Scores are age-standardised to ensure that older students don’t have an advantage based on their age.

 

How to Prepare for the Chesham Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

Preparing for the 11 Plus exam requires organisation. It’s a good idea to create a revision timetable with your child to ensure that they cover each topic. The sooner your child starts studying for the tests, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we recommend introducing practice exam papers early in the studying process. Not only do practice tests help familiarise students with the layout of the exam but they help them get used to the types of questions they may be asked on the day.

 

Doing timed practice papers under exam conditions in the lead up to the exam can help improve time management skills. The more practice your child has in answering questions quickly and under pressure, the more comfortable they’ll feel on the day of the tests.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Chesham Grammar School 11+ exam:

 

 

The information provided about Chesham Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Chatham Grammar School for Girls website

Chatham Grammar School for Girls was founded in 1907. Located in Chatham, in Kent, the school admits girls aged between 11 and 18. The school has been rated as Outstanding by Ofsted and in 2008, won the Spanish School of the Year award from the UK Spanish Embassy. The school has a reputation for producing consistently good GCSE and A Level results, particularly in English, where the school has produced some of the best results in the UK.

 

For an insight into what life is like at Chatham Grammar School for Girls, check out this video from one of their activity weeks:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Chatham Grammar School for Girls

 

Address: Chatham Grammar School for Girls, Rainham Road, Chatham, ME5 7EH

County: Kent

Admissions Info: postbox@chathamgirlsgrammar.medway.sch.uk, 01634 851262

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 902 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 142

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Medway 11 Plus/CEM

 

Chatham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

In Year 7, there are 142 places available based on performance in the entrance exam. Chatham Grammar School uses the Medway admission criteria to determine which pupils are eligible for a place. Each school within the Medway local authority uses a slightly different allocation criteria, with some focusing solely on performance in the 11 Plus exam, and others using additional criteria, like distance from the school. Parents should confirm the exact admission criteria for Chatham Grammar School for Girls with the school before completing the Common Application Form (CAF).

 

Children who attend a primary school in Medway take the 11 Plus exam at their current school. Those who live outside the area, will take the exam in an independent centre. The Medway Test is used only by Medway grammar schools and isn’t used by other schools in the Kent area.

 

However, the Chatham Grammar Schools, as an exception, do admit students who pass either the Medway Test, or the Kent Test.

 

More information on the Chatham Grammar School for Girls exam, can be accessed on the Medway local authority website, here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Chatham Grammar School for Girls

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Chatham Grammar School for Girls, parents need to complete the Common Application Form (CAF), as administered by the Medway local authority. More detailed information about the registration process is published in the booklet Admission to Secondary School: A Guide for Parents, which is distributed to all primary schools in the Medway area. Additionally, there are opportunities for parents and students to visit the school in October to learn more about the admissions process and to visit the school grounds.

 

In the case of over-subscription for places, the school uses its over-subscription criteria to determine which students are given priority.

 

Chatham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

This year, the Medway exam will be created by the Centre of Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM). The Chatham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus exam consists of:

  • A verbal reasoning test
  • A Maths test
  • An English (extended writing) test

The verbal reasoning and Maths tests last 50 minutes each and both are in multiple choice format. The English test usually takes the form of an essay and last 50 minutes, which includes 10 minutes of planning time.

 

How to Prepare for the Chatham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

When it comes to preparing for the 11 Plus entrance exam, it’s best to start revising early. The sooner your daughter starts studying for the tests, the more time she’ll have to improve her score.

 

We advise that it’s best for students to create a revision timetable that outlines everything they need to cover before the exam date. We encourage pupils to introduce practice exam papers early in their revision, so they can identify their strengths and weaknesses.

 

In the lead up to the exam, it’s a good idea to encourage your daughter to do practice papers under exam conditions, so she gets used to answering questions quickly and under pressure. Not only do practice exam papers help students familiarise themselves with the types of questions they may be asked, but they can also help improve time managements skills.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Chatham Grammar School for Girls 11+ exam:

 

11+ CEM Maths

11+ CEM Verbal Reasoning

11+ CEM Cloze

11+ CEM Comprehension

11+ English Spelling

 

The information provided about Chatham Grammar School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Chelmsford County High School for Girls website

Chelmsford County High School for Girls was founded in 1906. Located in Chelmsford, in Essex, the school accepts girls aged between 11 and 18 years old. CCHS, as it’s known locally, is considered one of the most competitive schools in the area to gain admission. It is considered one of the highest performing in the UK with students frequently scoring top marks at GCSE and A Level.  CCHS has Technology, Music and Language College status and converted to an academy in 2011.

 

For an insight into life in Year 7 at Chelmsford County High School for Girls, check out this welcome video:

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Chelmsford County High School for Girls

 

Address: Chelmsford County High School for Girls, Broomfield Road, Chelmsford, CM1 1RW

County: Essex

Admissions Info: admissions@cchs.essex.sch.uk, 01245 352592

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 889+ (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (Durham University)

 

Chelmsford County High School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Chelmsford County High School for Girls is based on a pupil’s performance in the 11 Plus entrance exam. All applicants must satisfy the school’s criteria and it should be noted that passing the entrance test isn’t a guarantee of a place in Year 7. A formal application should be made through the pupil’s local authority in order to be eligible to take the entrance test.

More information on the CCHS admissions process can be found on the school website, here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Chelmsford County High School for Girls

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Chelmsford County High School for Girls, parents need to register their child by completing the online application form on the school website. The school also has a Supplementary Information Form (SIF), which provides more information on the registration process.

 

CCHS should be named on the student’s Common Application Form (CAF), which can be submitted online, or by post to the school. In order to submit the form online, parents will need a passcode to gain access to the admission section of the site. In order to obtain a passcode, parents need to first of all, register their email address on the site, here. Paper registrations are also accepted and can be obtained by emailing the school directly at admissions@cchs.essex.sch.uk.

 

Additional documents needed to complete the Supplementary Information Form (SIF), include:

 

  1. A passport-sized photograph of the applicant
  2. Proof of address, including a council tax bill, and two utility bills
  3. A copy of your tenancy agreement, if living in rented property.
  4. Evidence to support request for special requirements.
  5. Evidence to support Pupil Premium eligibility, or Looked After Child status.

 

Chelmsford County High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The CCHS 11 Plus exam consists of two test papers, each lasting approximately 60 minutes. Each test contains a mix of the following elements:

 

  • Vocabulary, comprehension, verbal reasoning
  • Numerical reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning

 

The verbal reasoning test contains literacy and comprehension questions, rather than the usual verbal reasoning questions you’d typically find in the 11 Plus.

 

How to Prepare for the Chelmsford County High School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

Preparation for the 11 Plus entrance exam should begin early. The sooner your daughter begins her preparation, the more time she’ll have to improve any weak areas.

 

We advise students to create a revision timetable that covers all the elements they’ll need to know for the exam. Additionally, introducing practice exam papers early can provide a good indication of their current abilities.

 

As the exam approaches, it’s a good idea to have your daughter do timed practice papers, so she gets used to answering questions quickly and under pressure. The more practice papers she completes under test conditions, the better her time management skills will become.

 

Not only do practice exam papers help with time management, but they’re also a great way to help familiarise your child with the types of questions they may be asked on the day of the test. They also help students become familiar with the layout of the exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Chelmsford County High School for Girls 11+ exam:

 

Eleven Plus Comprehension (CEM)

Eleven Plus Cloze (CEM)

Eleven Plus Short Numerical Reasoning (CEM)

Eleven Plus Verbal Reasoning (CEM)

Eleven Plus English Spelling

 

The information provided about Chelmsford County High School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Carre's Grammar School website

Carre’s Grammar School was founded in 1604. A selective secondary school, Carre’s admits boys aged between 11 and 18. The school also has a co-educational sixth form. Located in Sleaford, in Lincolnshire, the school became an academy in 2011. Carre’s Grammar offers many clubs and societies, including sports clubs, language clubs, and music activities. Students from the school also frequently participate in the Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Carre’s Grammar School

 

Address: Carre’s Grammar School, Northgate, Sleaford, NG34 7DD

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: enquiries@carres.uk, 01529 302181

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 766 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Carre’s Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Carre’s Grammar School in Year 7 is governed by the Lincolnshire County Council’s Co-ordinated Admission Scheme. The governing body makes all decisions relating to admissions.

 

In order to gain a place at the school, pupils must firstly qualify under the school’s selection arrangements. At Carre’s Grammar, admission is based on student performance in the 11 Plus exam. The exam is set by GL Assessments and is age standardised. It’s worth noting that good performance in the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of a place at the school.

 

In the case of over-subscription, the school uses the following criteria to determine allocation priority to:

 

  1. Children who are, or who have been in looked-after care.

 

  1. Students who are registered for the Pupil Premium.

 

  1. Pupils who have brothers or sisters already at the school.

 

  1. Children who have attended one of the partner primary schools of Carre’s Grammar.

 

  1. Students who live closest to the school.

 

More information on the admission process to the school is available on the school website, here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Carre’s Grammar School

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Carre’s Grammar School, parents should complete the Common Application Form (CAF), which is available from the Lincolnshire County Council website. A registration form should also be completed, both of which can be obtained from this link.

 

More information about how to register for the 11 Plus exam at the school is given to the partner primary schools in April/May. Registration packs are sent out, which contain information about the tests and registration. It’s advised that these packs are completed and returned shortly after.

 

Parents of students who live outside the Lincolnshire county, can still apply for a place at the school. In such cases, the application form can be downloaded from the Consortium website, here.

 

Registration forms should be returned to the primary schools, or directly to Carre’s Grammar. The 11 Plus exam is taken at the Grammar School, although children from selective areas are able to take the exam at their own school.

 

Carre’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus exam at Carre’s Grammar School, consists of two tests:

  • Verbal reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning

 

The verbal reasoning test is taken first and last approximately 50 minutes, in which time pupils will be given 80 multiple choice questions. The non-verbal reasoning test is taken one week after the verbal test and consists of 70 questions (which include spatial reasoning). This test is also multiple choice and is answered one section at a time, as per the examiner’s instructions.

 

How to Prepare for the Carre’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

Preparing for the 11 Plus exam requires organisation. It’s recommended that your child starts studying for the tests several months before the exam date. The sooner your child starts revising, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that practice exam papers, coupled with a revision timetable is one of the most effective ways for your child to prepare. Not only do practice papers help identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they familiarise students with the layout of the exam and get them used to the types of questions that they may be asked on the day.

 

We’ve written several posts on our blog about how to prepare for the 11 Plus exam. We recommend having a read through the following:

 

 

We also produce exam papers that follow a similar structure to the GL Assessment tests that your child will take at Carre’s Grammar. We specifically recommend the following resources to help your child prepare:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

 

The information provided about Carre’s Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Calday Grammar School website

Calday Grange Grammar School was founded in 1636. Located in Birkenhead, the school is a non-denominational, selective grammar school. A boys’ grammar, Calday Grange admits students aged between 11 and 18. The school also has a co-educational sixth form. The school is the oldest grammar in the Wirral and gained academy status in 2013.

 

In 2015, the school achieved a 99.2% A Level pass rate and all students who applied to university were accepted by their first-choice. Sports play a big part in the school with students competing at local, regional and national level.

 

For an insight into life in Year 7 at Calday Grange Grammar School, check out this promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Calday Grange Grammar School

 

Address: Calday Grange Grammar School, Grammar School Lane, Birkenhead, CH48 8GG

County: Wirral

Admissions Info: theschool@calday.co.uk, 0151 625 2727

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1300+ (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 200

Open Day Date: November and March

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (Durham University)

 

Calday Grange Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Calday Grange admits students from all areas of the Wirral and welcomes students from surrounding areas to apply for entry in Year 7. Admission to the school is based on student performance in the 11 Plus exam. Students who attend a primary school in Wirral will take the test at their school, and pupils who live out with the county can take the test at one of the four Wirral selective schools.

 

It’s worth noting however, that good performance in the 11 Plus exam does not guarantee a place at the school. The 11 Plus exam is administered by the Wirral Consortium of Schools and follows the CEM Durham University exam format.

 

In cases where a pupil performance in the exam has been affected by illness, or other exceptional circumstances, parents can write to the school in explanation. The information will be considered by the Independent Assessment Board and parents will be notified of the outcome.

 

The school’s full admissions policy can be downloaded from their website, here.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Calday Grange Grammar School

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to Calday Grange, in the first instance, parents are asked to complete an Expression of Interest form. Afterwards, parents and students will be invited to an informal meeting with other interested families. These meetings aim to give parents and pupils a general overview of the school and more information on the admission procedure.

 

The next step in the application process is to attend a Taster Day. Here, students and parents will have the opportunity to meet the school staff, attend lessons and tour the school grounds.

 

After attending the Taster Day, if students are keen to attend the school, parents need to complete the school registration form, which is available directly from the school.

 

Calday Grange Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Calday Grange Grammar School consists of two tests that will cover Verbal, Non-Verbal and Numerical Ability.

 

Each test lasts approximately 50 minutes and contains a mixture of multiple choice and standard format questions. Test results are age-standardised to ensure that no pupil has an advantage based on their age.

 

How to Prepare for the Calday Grange Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The most effective approach to studying for the 11 Plus exam is to prepare well in advance of the exam date. The sooner your child starts studying for the tests, the more time they’ll have to improve their overall performance.

 

It’s a good idea for parents to create a study timetable with their child to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know. In addition, we recommend introducing practice exam papers early. Not only do practice papers enable you to identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they can help your child become familiar with the exam layout and the types of questions they may be asked.

 

As exam day approaches, you should encourage your child to do timed practice papers under exam conditions. This will help them get used to answering questions under pressure.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Calday Grange 11+ exam:

 

Eleven Plus: Comprehension (CEM) Pack 1

Eleven Plus: Cloze (CEM) Pack 1

Eleven Plus: Verbal Reasoning (CEM) Pack 1

Eleven Plus: Numeracy (CEM) Pack 1

Eleven Plus: English Spelling

 

The information provided about Calday Grange Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Caistor Grammar School website

Caistor Grammar School is a co-educational, selective grammar with academy status. Founded in 1630, the school is located in Caistor, in Lincolnshire. Known as one of the top-performing schools in the East Midlands, Caistor has won awards in sports and humanities. 11 Plus entry to the school is competitive and applications are often made from outside the town of Caistor. The school is currently ranked highly in terms of performance at GCSE and A Level and has gained 100% 5 A* to C grades in recent years. The school operates a house system with house, sports, and performing arts captains. The three school houses are Hansard, Ayscough, and Rawlinson.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Caistor Grammar School

 

Address: Caistor Grammar School, Church Street, Caistor, Lincoln, LN7 6QJ

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: admissions@caistorgrammar.com, 01472 851250

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 639 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 95

Open Day Date: May

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL or CEM

 

Caistor Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Although Caistor Grammar follows the Lincolnshire County Co-ordinated Admission Scheme, it’s not part of the Lincolnshire Consortium and therefore administers its own 11 Plus tests. More information on co-ordinated admission arrangements can be found on the Lincolnshire council website.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Caistor Grammar School

 

The first step to applying for 11 Plus entry to the school is to register your child using the online application form, which can be printed from the school website, here.

 

The school also encourages parents and students to attend their open evening, which takes place in May. The open evening provides pupils and their parents the opportunity to visit the school and meet some of the staff. There is also a talk given by the Headmaster on the night.

 

Caistor Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Caistor Grammar School is administered by the school itself and isn’t part of the Lincolnshire Consortium. The exam consists of two verbal reasoning tests, one of which is multiple choice and the other is in standard format, where students have to write and explain their answers.

 

In order to be eligible for entry to the school in Year 7, pupils need to attain a minimum aggregate score of 220. A 15-minute practice paper is administered before the exam begins in order to help familiarise students with the types of questions that they’ll be asked.

 

How to Prepare for the Caistor Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

As with any exam, the sooner you start preparing, the more time you’ll have to improve your performance. We recommend creating a study timetable with your child to make sure that they cover everything they’ll need to know for the tests. A ‘little but often’ approach usually works best and ensures that they don’t become overwhelmed with the workload.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that a significant amount of your child’s study time should be spent working on exam technique. By introducing practice exam papers early as part of your child’s revision, you’ll be able to identify their strengths and weaknesses and adjust their study timetable accordingly.

 

We’ve written several articles on our blog about studying for the exam. Some of which include:

 

 

Practice exam papers are a great way to familiarise your child with the layout of the 11 Plus exam, and it gets them used to the types of questions they may be asked on the day. In the months leading up to the test, it’s a good idea to introduce timed papers into your child’s revision. Doing practice tests under exam conditions, within the allocated time period can help improve your child’s time management skills.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Caistor Grammar School 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

11+ Verbal Reasoning (CEM) Pack 1

 

The information provided about Caistor Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+

Screenshot of Bushey Meads School

Bushey Meads School, known locally as BMS, is a co-educational school with academy status. Founding in 1957, the school is located in Bushey, Hertfordshire and forms part of the Bushey St James Trust alongside Little Reddings Primary School. The school is also a specialist technology college and has been featured in many UK TV programmes, including Grange Hill.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bushey Meads School

 

Address: Bushey Meads School, Coldharbour Lane, Bushey, WD23 4PA

County: Hertfordshire

Admissions Info: transfer.admissions@hertfordshire.gov.uk, 0208 950 3000

School Type: Mixed, partially selective

Number of pupils: 1060 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 170

Open Day Date: September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment and CEM (Durham University)

 

Bushey Meads School 11 Plus Admissions

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at Bushey Meads, students need to be registered with the South West Herts Consortium. Parents also need to complete the school’s Supplementary Information Form (SIF) and return it to the school. The form can be downloaded from the Bushey Meads website, here.

 

In cases where there are too many applicants per places available, the school uses its over-subscription criteria to determine which pupils will be given priority. The Bushey Meads over-subscription criteria gives priority to students that:

 

  • Have special educational needs, or a health and care plan.
  • Are in public care or have previously been in the past.
  • Have a sibling at the school.
  • Live within driving distance to the school

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bushey Meads School

 

In order to apply for 11 Plus entry to Bushey Meads, parents need to register their child with the Consortium. Registration can be completed via the Consortium website here, or by collecting a form from the school. Paper registrations can be returned to:

 

South West Herts School Tests

PO Box 2439

Watford

WD18 1UZ

 

The consortium advises that parents should check their child’s eligibility for entry before registering in order to avoid disappointment.

 

Bushey Meads School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The exam format for schools in Hertfordshire are set according to a Co-ordinated Admissions Scheme, which also includes partially-selective schools like Bushey Meads.

 

The exam consists of two tests:

 

  • A Maths paper set by GL Assessment
  • A Verbal Reasoning paper set by CEM

 

The Maths paper lasts approximately 50 minutes and the Verbal Reasoning test lasts approximately one hour.

 

Bushey Meads School also offers an additional test called the Technological Aptitude Test, which is based on non-verbal reasoning questions. The exam has two test papers, both of which are multiple choice. There are 17 places offered based on performance in this exam, although it is entirely optional.

 

For more information on the Bushey Meads 11 Plus exam, visit the South West Herts Consortium website.

 

How to Prepare for the Bushey Meads School 11 Plus Exam?

 

When preparing for the 11 Plus exam, it’s best to start early. The sooner your child begins revising, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas in the test. Try creating a study timetable with your child that maps out what they’ll study and when. This way, you’ll ensure that they cover all the material they’ll need to know.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’ve written several articles on studying for the exam. Some of which include:

 

 

As publishers of exam practice papers, we believe that one of the best approaches to studying for the tests is to introduce exam practice early. By working through practice questions from our range of 11 Plus papers, you’ll be able to identify your child’s strengths and their weak points. Practice papers are also a great way to familiarise your child with the exam layout and the types of questions that they may be asked on the day.

 

In the lead up to the exam, we’d recommend doing timed practice papers to improve your child’s time management skills.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Bushey Meads School 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources for the Bushy Meads 11+ exam:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning (CEM): Pack 1

11+ Cloze (CEM) Pack 1

11+ Comprehension (CEM) Pack 1

11+ Spelling

11+ Maths Grammar Schools Pack 1

11+ Maths Grammar Schools Pack 2

 

The information provided about Bushey Meads School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Bournemouth School website

Bournemouth School is a co-educational boys’ grammar school in Charminster, Bournemouth. The school admits pupils between the ages of 11 and 18. In 2011, Bournemouth School became an academy but kept its original name and uniform. The school is funded by the government, rather than the local authority and has close ties with Bournemouth School for Girls.

 

The school operates a house system to encourage pupils from all year groups to have good relationships. The houses compete in a range of competitions, including sports and academia. The five houses are: Darwin, Scott, Turner, Newton, Elgar. The school also has an active Combined Cadet Force (CCF), which is unusual for a state-funded school.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bournemouth School

 

Address: Bournemouth School, East Way, Bournemouth, BH8 9PY

County: Dorset

Admissions Info: office@bournemouth-school.org, 01202 512609

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1085 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Bournemouth School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Bournemouth School in Year 7 is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. There are currently 150 places allocated to Year 7 students. The school encourages prospective students and their parents to attend one of their open evenings, which take place in July. More information about the admissions process is provided on the night and students will have the opportunity to meet with staff and the Headmaster.

 

Once your son has taken the entrance exam, an application needs to be made through your local authority’s application system. In most cases, applications can be made online through your local authority’s website.

 

Any late applications will be handled after all those received within the deadline have been dealt with. In cases where there are more applicants than available places in Year 7, the school uses its over-subscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Students who are, or have previously been in looked-after care.
  • Those with the highest test scores
  • Pupils who live in Bournemouth and are ineligible for a Pupil Premium grant.
  • Those who live outside of Bournemouth and are eligible for a Pupil Premium grant.

 

For more information on Bournemouth School’s admission criteria, please follow this link.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bournemouth School

 

Parents of students who wish to register their son to sit the entrance tests, need to register with the school before the exam date. The registration form can be completed online here.

 

Late registrations will only be accepted in certain situations, such as illness, bereavement, or other circumstances out with control of the parents.

 

For pupils who were registered after the closing date, there is an opportunity to sit the entrance exam once the first round of allocations is completed.

 

Bournemouth School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Bournemouth School for Girls consists of an English, Maths, and Verbal Reasoning test. Each test paper includes questions typical to the KS2 national curriculum.

 

Parents will be notified of the test results in October, which will indicate whether the student has attained the required score to be eligible for admission. It’s important to note however, that passing the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of entry to the school.

 

All three tests are in multiple choice format and last around 50 minutes each.

 

How to Prepare for the Bournemouth School 11 Plus Exam?

 

It’s best to start preparing for the 11 Plus exam early. The more time your child has to study, the more time they’ll have to improve any gaps in their knowledge. We recommend a ‘little but often’ approach to studying for the entrance exam, by mapping out a study timetable. This way, you’ll ensure that your child covers everything they’ll need to know for the exam but won’t become overwhelmed by the workload.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’ve written several articles on studying for the exam. Some of which include:

 

 

We believe in introducing practice exam papers early in your child revision. Not only do practice papers help identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they can familiarise them with the layout of the tests and the types of questions they may be asked.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for format, content and style of the Bournemouth School 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Problem Solving Pack (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 3 (GL-style)

11+ Spelling

 

The information provided about Bournemouth School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Bournemouth School for Girls website

Bournemouth School for Girls is a girls’ grammar academy in Bournemouth, Dorset. The school admits girls aged between 11 and 18 and, since 2005, has been a humanities specialist school.

 

The school operates a house system with deputy captains that make up the Senior team. Within each house, girls are assigned different prefect positions in relation to sports, performing arts, and charities. Each house is named after an influential woman as follows: Jane Austen, Marie Curie, Rosalind Franklin, Rosa Parks, Christina Rossetti, and Mary Shelley.

 

The school offers a range of sporting activities including yoga, urban funk, golf and basketball. Like Bournemouth School, the girls’ school also has an active Combined Cadet Force, which is rare for a state-funded school.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to be a pupil at Bournemouth School for Girls, check out this promotional video:

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bournemouth School for Girls

 

Address: Bournemouth School for Girls, Castle Gate Close, Castle Gate West, Bournemouth, BH8 9UJ

County: Dorset

Admissions Info: office@bsg.bournemouth.sch.uk, 01202 526289

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1108 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 162

Open Day Dates: July/September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Bournemouth School for Girls 11 Plus Admissions

 

Bournemouth School for Girls aims to provide a selective education to its pupils. Admission to the school in Year 7 follows the procedure as agreed by the co-ordinated admission arrangements.

 

Girls are admitted to the school based on their performance in the entrance examination, which is the same exam administered by the consortium. Although the exam is the same across every school, each has its own admissions authority and over-subscription criteria.

 

Bournemouth School for Girls encourages prospective students and their parents to attend their open evening, which takes place in July and September. Pupils will have the opportunity to meet the school staff and visit the school grounds.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bournemouth School for Girls

 

Parents who want to register their child with the school can do so by completing an online registration form on the school website at www.bsg.bournemouth.sch.uk . Paper registration forms are also available directly from the school.

 

Any late applications will be handled after all those received within the deadline have been dealt with. In cases where there are more applicants than available places in Year 7, the school uses its over-subscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Students who are, or have previously been in looked-after care.
  • Those with the highest test scores
  • Pupils who live in Bournemouth and are ineligible for a Pupil Premium grant.
  • Those who live outside of Bournemouth and are eligible for a Pupil Premium grant.

 

Bournemouth School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Bournemouth School for Girls consists of a Maths test, an English test and a Verbal Reasoning test. The exam is based one the KS2 curriculum.

 

Parents will be notified of the test results in October, which will indicate whether the student has attained the required score to be eligible for admission. It’s important to note however, that passing the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of entry to the school.

 

All three tests are in multiple choice format and last around 50 minutes each.

 

How to Prepare for the Bournemouth School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

The best approach to studying for the 11 Plus exam is to adopt a ‘little but often’ approach. The sooner your child starts revising for the tests, the more time they’ll have to improve their weak areas.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’ve written several articles on studying for the exam. Some of which include:

 

 

It’s a good idea to create a revision timetable with your child to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know for the exam. In addition, we recommend introducing practice exam papers early in your child’s revision. Practice papers can help identify strengths and weaknesses and familiarise your child with the exam layout.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Bournemouth School for Girls 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ Mathematics Problem Solving (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 1 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 2 (GL-style)

11+ English Pack 3 (GL-style)

11+ English Spelling

 

The information provided about Bournemouth School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Bourne Grammar School

Bourne Grammar School was founded in 1330 and is a co-educational grammar. Prior to gaining academy status in 2012, the school used to be an Arts College. Bourne Grammar operates a house system, with each one named after its original leader. The four houses are Behn, Meitner, Rorschach and Tinbergen.

 

The school has a reputation for producing good exam results and is within the top three best performing schools in the East Midlands. Bourne Grammar School is also known for its sports and PE is one of the most popular subjects at the school. Some of the sporting activities on offer include netball, rugby, gymnastics, cricket, and orienteering.

 

Music and Drama are also on the Year 7 curriculum and students have many opportunities to get involved in school productions, concerts and performances.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to study at Bourne Grammar School, check out this promotional video:

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bourne Grammar School

 

Address: Bourne Grammar School, South Road, Borne, PE10 9JE

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: admissions@bourne-grammar.lincs.sch.uk, 01778 422 288

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 150 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 150

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Bourne Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Bourne Grammar School is determined by student performance in the 11 Plus exam. The exam takes place in September for entry the following year and consists of a verbal, non-verbal and spatial awareness test.

 

The 11 Plus exam at Bourne Grammar is co-ordinated by the Lincolnshire Consortium of Grammar Schools. The consortium has agreed an admission to Bourne Grammar of 150 Year 7 pupils each year, in keeping with the current size of the school. In cases where there are more applicants than spaces available, the consortium uses an over-subscription criteria which requires students to have a standardised score of 220 or more and:

 

  • Have special educational needs, or a health and care plan.
  • Are in public care or have previously been in the past.
  • Have a sibling at the school.
  • Live within driving distance to the school.

 

For more information on the Bourne Grammar School admissions policy, visit this link.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bourne Grammar School

 

To apply to sit the Bourne Grammar School 11 Plus exam, students need to apply by completing the registration form, which can be found here. Before registering, parents and students are encouraged to visit the school during its open evening, which normally takes place in June. This gives students and parents the opportunity to meet with staff and talk with current pupils at the school.

 

Bourne Grammar advises that students are registered sooner rather than later as places in Year 7 are limited. Once your child is registered, details of the testing days are sent by post, around September.

 

Bourne Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Bourne Grammar consists of two tests: a verbal reasoning, and a non-verbal and spatial reasoning test. The scores from each are combined and only students who attain 220 or above will be considered for entry. However, it’s worth noting that passing the exam does not guarantee a place at the school.

 

The verbal reasoning test is taken first and consists of 80 questions, lasting around 50 minutes. Questions are multiple choice and split into individual sections, with 5 or 6 questions in each. Answer sheets are marked by a third-party organisation using an electronic marking device.

 

The Non-Verbal & Spatial Reasoning test is taken one week after the verbal reasoning. The test consists of 70 questions, split over 5 sections and must be answered one section at a time, as instructed by the invigilator. Students have 7 minutes to complete each section.

 

The results of the 11 Plus exam will be sent by post in October.

 

How to Prepare for the Bourne Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The best approach to studying for the 11 Plus exam is to adopt a ‘little but often’ approach. The sooner your child starts revising for the tests, the more time they’ll have to improve their weak areas.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’ve written several articles on studying for the exam. Some of which include:

 

 

It’s a good idea to create a revision timetable with your child to make sure that they cover everything they’ll need to know for the exam. We also encourage students to use practice exam papers early in their revision as a way of gauging their current abilities. By regularly doing practice exam papers, your child will become familiar with the layout of the tests and the types of questions that may be asked on the day.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Bourne Grammar School 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following relevant resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

11+ Non Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

 

The information provided about Bourne Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Boston High School website

Boston High School was founded in 1914 and admits students aged between 11 and 18. The school is a selective grammar for girls and is located in Boston, Lincolnshire. The school also has a co-educational sixth form college, which enables boys to study at the school in their final year. In 2013, the school became an academy whilst retaining its original name.

 

Boston High School has close links with Boston Grammar School and an umbrella trust exists to support collaboration between the two schools. In 2014, the school was rated as having ‘outstanding’ leadership, behaviour and safety by Ofsted.

 

The school operates a house system, with each house named after significant figures in the school’s history. There are five school houses; Allan, Conway, Ingelow, Kitwood and Lindis.

11 Plus Exam Information for Boston High School

 

 

Address: Boston High School, Spilsby Road, Boston, PE21 9PF

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: enquiries@bostonhighschool.co.uk, 01205 350235

School Type: Girls’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 689 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Boston High School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Boston High School admits pupils based on their results in the 11 Plus exam. The required level of attainment is set out by the Lincolnshire Consortium of Grammar Schools. Only pupils who achieve the desired results will be considered for entry to the school.

 

Students who satisfy the entry requirements are offered a place although it should be noted that passing the 11 Plus exam doesn’t guarantee your daughter a place at the school.

 

In order to be considered for entry in Year 7, students need to be registered through the co-ordinated admissions scheme as set out by Lincolnshire County Council. All applications for entry need to be submitted by parents online, or through the local authority’s Common Application Form (CAF).

 

In cases where there are more qualified students than available places, the local authority uses its over-subscription criteria to determine admissions. Priority is given to pupils who:

 

  • Are in local authority care, or have previously been looked-after by the local authority.
  • Have a sibling who already attends the school.
  • Lives within driving distance to the school.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Boston High School

 

In order to apply for entry to Year 7 at the school, students need to be registered to sit the 11 Plus exam. The registration form can be found on the Boston High School website here, and copies are also sent to primary schools in the area.

 

Registration forms need to be returned to the school before the deadline date in March. Lincolnshire County Council will then write to parents, requesting the student’s preferences for secondary schools. This application form should be completed and returned to the local authority by October.

 

For students who live outside of the Lincolnshire area, parents need to contact their own local authority for details on how to state Boston High School as their child’s preferred choice.

 

The verbal reasoning test takes place in September at your daughter’s primary school. Approximately one week later, students then take the non-verbal/spatial awareness test, also at their primary school.

 

Results of the 11 Plus exam are posted to parents and by March, the local authority will send out offers of places.

Boston High School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

 

The 11 Plus Exam at Boston High School consists of two tests:

 

  • Verbal reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning/spatial awareness

 

Both tests are taken at the students’ primary schools although arrangements can be made with the High School for pupils to sit the test there. In order to select the top 25% of pupils, the tests are ranked in order and age standardised.

 

How to Prepare for the Boston High School 11 Plus Exam?

 

Studying for the 11 Plus exam requires planning. It’s best to encourage your child to start revising sooner rather than later, so you have a good general overview of their abilities. A study timetable can help ensure that they cover all the material they’ll need to know for the exam and it can help ensure that they stick to a regular study schedule

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that your child will also benefit from working through practice exam papers early on in the revision. Practice papers are a great way to test your child’s current abilities and identify any weak areas that need improving. Regular testing with practice papers is a good way to chart your child’s progress and it helps familiarise them with the exam layout and the types of questions they’ll be asked on the day.

 

In the weeks leading up to the exam, it’s a good idea to have your child do timed practice papers under exam conditions so they get used to answering questions to a deadline. The more they practice with timed papers, the more their time management skills will improve.

 

We have several Eleven Plus practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Boston High School 11 Plus exam.

 

We specifically recommend the following relevant resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

11+ Non-Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

 

The information provided about Boston High School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Boston Grammar School website

Established in 1555, Boston Grammar School (or BGS for short) is a selective grammar for boys aged 11 to 18. The school also admits girls into its Sixth Form. Located in Boston, Lincolnshire, the school became a selective academy in 2013. Boston operates a house system, whereby pupils are placed into one of four houses to encourage loyalty, competition and pastoral care. The four houses at Boston Grammar are named after important figures in the school’s history: Muston, Laughton, Gannock, and Parry.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Boston Grammar School

 

Address: Boston Grammar School, Rowley Road, Boston, PE21 6JY

County: Lincolnshire

Admissions Info: enquiries@bostongrammarschool.co.uk , 01205 366444

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 507 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 115

Open Day Date: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Boston Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to the school is determined by pupil performance in the 11 Plus exam. At Boston Grammar, the 11 Plus is co-ordinated by the Lincolnshire Consortium of Grammar Schools, where 12 of the 14 grammars in the county follow the same test procedures.

 

Students normally take the Eleven Plus tests at their current primary schools, although arrangements can be made for them to sit the exam at BGS, subject to agreement between the school heads. Students who score within the top 25% of the exam will be considered for admission to the school, which is the same as the percentage intake across all Lincolnshire grammar schools.

 

Pupils who meet the required standards in the 11 Plus and satisfy the school’s location criteria will be offered a place in Year 7, subject to availability. It’s important to note that good performance in the exam itself, does not necessarily guarantee a place at the school.

 

In cases where there are more successful applicants than places available at the school, the local authority uses its over-subscription criteria to decide which students will be accepted. In such cases, priority will be given to students who:

 

  • Are in local authority care, or have previously been looked-after by the local authority.
  • Have a sibling who already attends the school.
  • Live within driving distance of the school.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Boston Grammar School

 

Parents can register their child for entry in Year 7 at Boston Grammar by completing the school’s registration form, which is available here. Applicants must be registered before they can take the 11 Plus exam.

 

Boston Grammar School sends out information packs to the parents of children in Year 5 of primary schools in the area. The packs are sent out around April/May and provide further information about the registration process, including the registration form and information about the exam itself.

 

Parents of children who live outside of Lincolnshire, or who live in a non-selective area of the county can apply directly to the school by completing the Application Form from the Consortium website, here.

 

Completed registration forms should be returned to the student’s primary school, or sent directly to the grammar school by post. The forms also provide the opportunity to inform the school of any special education needs, or disability that may have an impact on the exam arrangements.

 

Boston Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Boston Grammar School 11 Plus exam consists of two tests:

 

  • Verbal reasoning, and
  • Non-verbal reasoning

 

The verbal reasoning test is taken first and consists of around 80 questions, split over 3 sections. The paper lasts for 50 minutes and all questions are multiple choice.

 

The non-verbal reasoning test is taken one week after the verbal reasoning exam. There are approximately 70 questions, split over 5 sections and all questions are multiple choice.

 

How to Prepare for the Boston Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

When it comes to preparing for the Eleven Plus exam, it’s best to start early. The sooner your child starts revising, the more time they’ll have to increase their knowledge and improve their exam technique.

 

It’s a good idea to create a revision timetable with your child, making sure that they study all the elements of the exam.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we would encourage students to use practice exam papers early in their revision in order to provide an overview of their current abilities. Not only do practice papers help identify students’ strengths and weaknesses, but they help familiarise them with the layout of the exam.

 

Regularly testing your child with exam practice papers can be also be a good way of monitoring their progress.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Boston Grammar School 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 1

11+ Verbal Reasoning: Pack 2

11+ Non Verbal Reasoning (Pack 1)

 

The information provided about Boston Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Borden Grammar School website

Established in 1878, Borden Grammar School, is a selective Boy’s Grammar located in Sittingbourne, in Kent. The school educates pupils aged between 11 and 18 and has academy status. Although a boy’s grammar, the school does admit girls into its sixth form.

 

In 2006, Borden was awarded specialist school status in Sports and Modern Foreign Languages. As a result, the school received an increase in funding, which led to the development of a new library, a multi-use games area and a new private study area. The school also received a sports bursary in 2011, which was used to build a climbing wall in the gym.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Borden Grammar School

 

Address: Borden Grammar School, Avenue of Remembrance, Sittingbourne, ME10 4DB

County: Kent

Admissions Info:   school@bordengrammar.kent.sch.uk, 01795 424192

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 778 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Exam (GL)

 

Borden Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Borden Grammar School is determined by student performance in the Kent 11 Plus Test. The Borden Grammar website states that the principal behind admissions to the school is to ‘maintain the character’ of a selective school.

 

Borden Grammar expects its pupils to demonstrate a strong work ethic and commitment to their studies.  In order to be eligible to apply for entry in Year 7, students need to have attained the required standard in terms of aptitude.

 

In cases where the number of applicants is greater than the spaces available at the school, Borden Grammar uses the following over-subscription criteria, giving priority to:

 

  • Children in Local Authority Care
  • Pupils who are eligible for free school meals
  • Students who already have a sibling at the school
  • Health and special access reasons
  • Students who live closest to the school

 

The parents of students who are not awarded a place can appeal the decision in front of an Independent Appeals Panel. Specific details of the appeals process is normally sent to parents at the same time as the offer letters.

 

For some general advice about appeals, take a look at our 11 Plus Appeals Advice post.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Borden Grammar School

 

In order to apply for Year 7 entry to the school, parents need to complete a registration form and a Common Application Form (CAF). More details about the registration process are available by contacting the school on 01795 424192, or by emailing school@bordengrammar.kent.sch.uk.

 

Borden Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Borden Grammar School follows the Kent 11 Plus exam format, which consists of tests in Reasoning, English and Maths, as well as a writing task.The test is used to assess whether your child is suitable for entry to the school and the format is used by most, but not all, of the 35 wholly selective and 4 partially selective grammar schools in the region.

 

The exam format is as follows:

  • Section 1: A one hour long exam that tests students’ reasoning abilities. Broken down into three shorter sections, the test focuses on Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.
  • Section 2: A one hour long exam that tests English and Maths.
  • Section 3:A writing task that lasts for 40 minutes, including 10 minutes’ preparation time. The writing task isn’t marked for the purposes of the 11 Plus exam but may be used as evidence for borderline cases.

Click here for a detailed breakdown of the Kent 11+ Test, including sample question.

 

How to Prepare for the Borden Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The sooner your child starts preparing for the 11 Plus exam, the more time they’ll have to improve their knowledge and exam technique. We advise creating a revision timetable with your child to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know for the test. A revision timetable can be as simple as a wall planner or a spreadsheet.

 

For more information on how to prepare for the Eleven Plus, take a look at our post Last Minute Preparation Tips for the 11 Plus Exam.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that the ‘little but often’ approach works best when studying for each test. Try to break down your child’s revision into small sections to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know. Additionally, it’s a good idea to dedicate time to improving any weak areas.

 

Practice exam papers can provide parents with a good indication of their child’s current abilities. Introducing practice papers early in your child’s revision will enable you to monitor their progress in the lead up to the exam.

 

We recommend the following resources that have been specifically designed for the Kent Test:

 

 

The following resources will provide excellent subject specific practice:

 

 

The information provided about Borden Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Bishop Wordsworth's School website

Bishop Wordsworth’s School, often shortened to BWS, is an all boys’ grammar school for students aged 11 to 18. Located in Salisbury, Wiltshire, the school was founded in 1889. Bishop’s is consistently identified as one of the top-performing schools for exam results in England and in 2010, the school had the best performance in the English Baccalaureate.

 

In recent years, the school has undergone several redevelopments which have seen the addition of a new classroom block, a drama studio, sports hall, PE facilities, a new sixth form block and a cookery room. The school was granted academy status in 2011 and has been awarded specialisms in Languages and Science.

 

For a general overview of what it’s like to study at Bishop Wordsworth’s School, check out the promotional video below:

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bishop Wordsworth’s School

 

Address: Bishop Wordsworth’s School, Exeter Street, Salisbury, SP1 2ED

County: Wiltshire

Admissions Info: cms@bws.wilts.sch.uk, 01722 333851

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 884 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 160

Open Day Dates: June and July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

Bishop Wordsworth’s School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Bishop’s is a selective grammar school and sets its own admission requirements. Students who live within a reasonable travelling distance are eligible to apply for entry to the school. For more information on the school’s designated area, please click here.

 

In order to gain entry to Bishop’s, all boys must take an entrance examination. Admission is based on students attaining the desired grading in the selection process for the relevant year of entry. The entrance test is used to show that pupils have the appropriate academic ability for the school.

 

If more students pass the 11 Plus exam than there are places available, the school then uses its oversubscription criteria and the waiting list process begins.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bishop Wordsworth’s School

 

In order to apply for 11 Plus entry to BWS, parents need to complete the online registration form. This also provides the school with evidence of the application for its oversubscription criteria. The application form is made available on the school website from May.

 

Any forms received after July will be considered late registrations and given second priority to registrations made on time. Boys who are registered late will sit the 11 Plus exam around November.

 

More information about registering your son at the school can be found in the school’s document Information Leaflet One.

 

Bishop Wordsworth’s School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Bishop Wordsworth’s School uses The Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring CEM) assessment tests for entry to Year 7 and papers are marked by the CEM. Test scores are age-standardised to ensure that no student has an advantage based on his age.

 

The Bishop’s 11 Plus exam consists of two timed papers, lasting 50 minutes each. Each paper tests verbal reasoning, non-verbal reasoning and numerical ability in multiple choice format. It’s worth noting that the CEM definition of Verbal Reasoning also covers topics such as Comprehension and Cloze. Students are expected to be able to demonstrate skills appropriate to the Key Stage 2 English and Maths curriculum.

 

Each paper has its own timed sections and questions are contained within a booklet. Students are required to record their answers on a separate answer sheet.

 

How to Prepare for the Bishop Wordsworth’s School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The best approach to studying for the 11 Plus is to start early. The sooner your child starts revising, the more time they’ll have to focus on any areas that need improving. To begin with, it’s a good idea to create a study timetable with your child to ensure that they cover all the material they’ll need to know.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we’re big advocates of using practice exam papers as a way of identifying your child’s strengths and weaknesses. By introducing practice papers early, you’ll be able to adjust the focus of your child’s studying to make sure they’re concentrating on their weak areas.

 

As their studying progresses, you can re-introduce the practice papers to monitor your child’s progress. Not only do exam practice papers help identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they also help familiarise students with the format of the 11 Plus exam.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the Bishop Wordsworth’s 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Bishop Wordsworth’s School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Bishop Vesey's Grammar School website

Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School, or BVGS was founded in 1527 and is one of the oldest schools in Britain. A state grammar school with academy status, BVGS is located in Sutton Coldfield in the West Midlands. Although no longer under local authority control, the school continues to cooperate closely with Birmingham local authorities in regards to admissions.

 

Until the 1880s, the school offered both day and boarding but now only offers day places. With approximately 945 pupils, the school is known for having good rugby union and hockey teams.

 

The school became a Language College in 2004 and in 2011, it gained Training School status and now provides in-service and work experience training for teachers. BVGS is also a Sixth Form College.

 

For an overview of what it’s like to study at Bishop Vesey’s Grammar, take a look at this promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School

 

Address: Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School, Lichfield Road, Sutton Coldfield, B74 2NH

County: Birmingham

Admissions Info: 0121 250 5400, admissions@birmingham.gov.uk

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 945 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 125

Open Day Dates: July and September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Bishop Vesey’s is part of ‘The Grammar Schools of Birmingham Consortium’ and follows a set admission criteria which is based on pupils’ academic performance in the entrance exam and only boys who attain the required standard will be considered for entry.

 

The consortium arrangements require that students are selected for admission based on their combined, age-standardised score in the 11 Plus exam. In order to be eligible for admission, pupils need to attain the minimum ‘qualifying score’ in the exam. However, attainment of the qualifying score doesn’t guarantee students a place at the school.

 

Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School no longer offers boarding and pupils are admitted purely on the basis of their 11 Plus test results. All candidates who achieve the qualifying minimum score are then ranked in order with priority given to students who fall within the following criteria:

 

  1. Looked after children, or children who have previously been classified so.
  2. Those who live closest to the school.
  3. Students who are registered for Pupil Premium and are registered for free school meals.

 

Parents can also opt for their child to sit an additional entry test, the scores of which, may be used in appeals cases.

 

More information about the admission policy of Bishop Vesey’s can be found on the school website, via this link.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School

 

In order to apply for admission to the school in Year 7, parents need to register their child by completing the online application form, which can be accessed here. A Change of School application form also needs to be completed and can be obtained by contacting the school directly on 0121 250 5400, or by emailing admissions@birmingham.gov.uk. Additionally, a Test Registration form and a Local Authority Preference form needs to be completed and returned to the school.

 

In order to complete the full application, parents also need to provide a recent passport sized-photograph of their child, which can be emailed alongside the required forms.

 

Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Bishop Vesey’s 11 Plus exam consists of two test papers, each lasting approximately 45 minutes. The papers are separated into individually timed sections that cover:

 

  • Verbal reasoning
  • Non-verbal reasoning
  • Mathematics
  • Reading comprehension/literacy skills

 

Most questions will be multiple choice and scores are age-standardised to ensure that no students have an advantage based on their age. The school also sends out sample questions once they’ve received the student’s application form.

 

More information about the exam format can be found in the Birmingham Familiarisation Booklet.

 

How to Prepare for the Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The sooner your child starts preparing for the 11 Plus exam, the more time they’ll have to hone their skills. In addition to knowing the material, it’s important that they have the exam skills they’ll need on the day.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that using practice exam papers in addition to a study schedule can really help your child improve their chances of doing well. By introducing exam practice papers early, you’ll be able to identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses. You can then adjust their study schedule accordingly.

 

Not only do practice papers help familiarise your child with the exam format, but they help them get used to the type of questions that they may be asked on the day.

 

As the exam approaches, it’s a good idea to encourage your child to do timed practice papers so they get used to answering the questions under pressure. The more timed papers they do, the more their time management skills will improve.

 

We have several 11+ practice papers that can help your child prepare for the Bishop Vesey’s Grammar 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Bishop Vesey’s Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Bexley Grammar School website

Bexley Grammar School was founded in 1955 and was opened by Sir Edward Heath, who was a Member of Parliament at the time. A Co-educational grammar, Bexley is a specialist Language, Science and Mathematics College and used to have foundational school status before converting to an academy in 2011.

 

From 2017, the school began offering the International Baccalaureate in place of A Levels in Sixth Form. Students who attend the school are placed in one of six ‘houses’, which has around 12 members of staff in each house.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bexley Grammar School

 

Address: Bexley Grammar School, Danson Lane, Welling, DA16 2BL

County: Kent

Admissions Info: enquiries@bexleygs.co.uk, 0208 304 8538

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,481 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 190

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

Bexley Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to Bexley Grammar School is selective, following the results of the Bexley Selection Tests, which take place in September. Bexley Grammar School is part of the Bexley Co-ordinated Secondary School Admission Scheme and parents who wish to put their child forward for the tests, should visit the local authority website. Parents also need to complete the Common Application Form (CAF) with the school included in the list of preferences.

 

In order to be eligible for a place at the school, students need to achieve the required score in the selection tests, which are age standardised. Once the scores from the tests are in, they are then considered by a selection panel in order to determine which pupils are ‘deemed selective’.

 

Allocation decisions are based on the test results, although the Headteacher from the pupil’s primary school can request a review of the results if they feel something has been overlooked. In the case of over-subscription to the school, the following criteria is used:

 

  • Looked After Children and Previously Looked After Children
  • Guaranteed Grammar School Place (highest 180 scores)
  • Siblings
  • Staff Children
  • Distance

Parents will find out the results of the selection tests in mid-October and in March, the local authority will send details of the school that your child has been offered.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bexley Grammar School

 

To apply for your child to sit the selection tests, you need to register them on the Bexley Local Authority website. Registration forms are made available before applications open. You will also need to complete the Common Application Form, where you can list your child’s preferred schools in order.

 

Bexley Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11+ Exam at Bexley Grammar school includes two papers, each lasting around 50 minutes. The papers contain a mixture of the following elements:

 

 

Most of the questions in the test papers are multiple choice, although some of the maths and problem solving questions are asked in standard format, where students will need to present their answers in written form and show their mathematical workings.

 

How to Prepare for the Bexley Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

When it comes to studying for the Eleven Plus, the more organised your child is, the better they’ll be able to cover the material they’ll need to know for the tests. Try creating a revision timetable with your child that maps out what topics they need to study on what days. A revision timetable can be as simple as an Excel spreadsheet or a wall planner and can make all the difference in organising your child’s studying.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that the ‘little but often’ approach to studying works well. If your child revises regularly for short intervals, they’ll retain more information than they would if they studied for long periods of time infrequently.

 

One of the best ways to gauge your child’s current level and abilities is to introduce practice exam papers early. Not only will they help you identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they’ll help your child familiarise themselves with the layout of the exam.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice papers that can help your child prepare for the Bexley Grammar 11 Plus exam.

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Bexley Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Beths Grammar School website

Beths Grammar School (known locally as Beths), is a boys’ grammar school located in Bexley, in South-East London. The school was founded in 1945 under the name Erith Technical School and became a grammar in 1976. The school performs well locally with pupils typically achieving A to C grades at GCSE level. Boys are admitted from 11 years old, with girls joining in Sixth Form.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to study at Beths Grammar School, take a look at this Sixth Form Leavers’ video created by students at the school.

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Beths Grammar School

 

Address: Beths Grammar School, Hartford Road, Bexley, DA5 1NE

County: Kent

Admissions Info: admin@beths.bexley.sch.uk, 01322 556538

School Type: Boys’ Grammar

Number of pupils: 1,199 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 192

Open Day Date: October

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus – University of Durham

 

Beths Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admissions to the school in Year 7 are determined by student performance in the Bexley Selection Test, which take place in September. The school is part of the Bexley Co-ordinated Secondary School Admissions Scheme, which has a set application process alongside other schools in the area.

 

The school is selective, therefore only students who attain the standard set by the local authority are eligible to apply for admittance. The admissions policy is made available on the Bexley Local Authority website prior to applications opening.

 

After your child has taken the selection test, results are sent to parents in October, by which point, the Common Application Form (CAF) should have been returned to the local authority. There are 192 places offered in Year 7 and the school is often over-subscribed. In such cases, places are determined based on the following criteria:

 

1.     Students who are, or have been, Looked After Children.

2.     Those who have achieved the highest 180 scores in the 11 Plus exam.

3.     Children who already have a sibling at the school.

4.     The distance the student lives from the school.

5.     Where distance to the school is identical, selection test scores are then considered.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Beths Grammar School

 

To apply for 11 Plus entry to Beths Grammar, parents need to check that their child meets the admissions criteria. Further details can be found on the Bexley Local Authority website here once applications are open. A registration form and a Common Application Form then needs to be completed on the local authority website.

 

Beths Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Eleven Plus Exam at Beths Grammar consists of two papers that last approximately 50 minutes each. The papers contain a mix of the following elements:

 

 

Most of the questions will be multiple choice, with some of the maths questions asked as standard format questions.

 

How to Prepare for the Beths Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we always advise that it’s best to start 11 Plus preparation early. The sooner your child begins a regular study routine, the more time they’ll have to get used to the types of questions that may be asked in the exam.

 

Usually, a ‘little but often’ approach works best when it comes to studying for the tests. Try breaking down your child’s revision into small chunks to ensure that all the exam elements are covered.

 

Practice exam papers are a great way to help your child get used to the exam layout and the allocated times that they have for each paper. If you introduce practice papers early in your child’s revision, you’ll be able to monitor their improvement as their studying progresses.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice papers that can help your child prepare for the Beths Grammar 11 Plus exam. We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Beths Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Barton Court Grammar School website

Barton Court Grammar School was originally founded as Barton Court Grammar School for Girls before World War II. The current school is a selective, co-educational Academy of Excellence.

 

The school is situated in Canterbury, Kent and educates approximately 838 students, aged between 11 and 18. The school has previously been rated as ‘Outstanding’ by OFTSTED and has Foreign Language College status. With a range of extra-curricular activities on offer, including a choir, a debating club and an orchestra, the school encourages non-academic interests as well as performance in the classroom.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Barton Court Grammar School

 

Address: Barton Court Grammar School, Longport, Canterbury, CT1 1PH

County: Kent

Admissions Info: 01227 464600

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 838 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Kent 11 Plus Test

 

Barton Court Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admissions to Barton Court Grammar School are handled by a Co-ordinated Admission Scheme, administered by the Kent Local Authority. Students are normally admitted in Year 7, after having gained a place through the Kent Procedure for Entry to Secondary Education (PESE). In order to be eligible for admission, parents must include Barton Court Grammar School on the Common Application Form (CAF).

 

In the case of over-subscription, places are determined by a set criteria in priority order. The criteria includes:

 

  • Children in local authority care
  • The family’s current association with the school
  • Special needs, or health reasons
  • The proximity of the school to the student’s home

 

For parents who wish to apply for a place for a child that doesn’t fit the normal age group, a request needs to be made to the school’s Headteacher as early as possible. This enables the admissions authority to make a decision before the application closing date. In such cases, the student in question is expected to have attained the appropriate level in the Kent PESE Tests, although attainment is not a guarantee of a school place.

 

More admissions information is available from the Kent County Council Determined Co-ordinated Scheme for Secondary Admissions 2017/18 document.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Barton Court Grammar School

 

The registration process for entry to grammars in the Kent area differs from school to school, so it’s advised that parents confirm the exact process directly with Barton Court Grammar. In addition to completing the school registration form, parents will also need to complete the Common Application Form (CAF).

 

Barton Court Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Barton Court Grammar follows the Kent 11 Plus exam format, which covers Reasoning, English and Maths.

 

The test is used to assess whether your child is suitable for entry to the school and the format is used by most, but not all, of the 35 wholly selective and 4 partially selective grammar schools in the region.

 

The exam format is as follows:

 

  • Section 1: A one hour long exam that tests students’ reasoning abilities. Broken down into shorter sections, the test focuses on Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.
  • Section 2: A one hour long exam that tests English and Maths
  • Section 3:A writing task that lasts for 40 minutes, including 10 minutes’ preparation time. The writing task isn’t marked for the purposes of the 11 Plus exam but may be used as evidence for borderline cases.

 

How to Prepare for the Barton Court Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

Preparing for the 11 Plus exam takes time, that’s why we advise parents to set the wheels in motion early. The sooner you can create a revision timetable with your child, the longer they’ll have to prepare.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that the ‘little but often’ approach works best when studying for the exam. Try to break down your child’s revision into small sections to ensure that they cover everything they’ll need to know. Additionally, it’s a good idea to dedicate time to improving any weak areas.

 

Practice exam papers are a great way to identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses. They can also help your child familiarise themselves with the exam layout and the types of questions they can expect on the day.

 

As exam day approaches, try doing timed practice papers with your child to help improve their time management skills and get them used to answering questions to a deadline.

 

We have several 11+ practice papers that are specifically designed to help students prepare for the Kent Test that is used for Barton Court Grammar 11 Plus admissions.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

Kent Practice Tests

 

 

English

 

 

Maths

 

 

Verbal Reasoning

 

 

Non-Verbal Reasoning

 

 

The information provided about Barton Court Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the BRGS website

Bacup and Rawtenstall Grammar School (BRGS) was originally founded in 1701 as Newchurch Grammar School. In 1913, the school moved to its current site and was renamed as Bacup and Rawtensall Grammar. The school is a co-educational and selective, with student admission based on performance in the 11 Plus exam.

 

With approximately 1,280 pupils, the school accepts students from Year 7 to Sixth Form. As a selective state school, competition for entry is strong and the school is oversubscribed. Bacup and Rawtenstall has a reputation for producing good exam results and the school consistently ranks well in the UK school league tables.

 

Most school leavers go on to further education with its pupils securing places at some of the UK’s top universities, including the Russell Group and Oxbridge.

 

For a general overview of the school, check out this promotional video made by the BRGS sixth form:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School

 

Address: Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School, Glen Road, Waterfoot, Rossendale, BB4 7BJ.

County: Lancashire

Admissions Info: enquiries@brgs.org.uk, 01706 234500

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 1280 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment

 

Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

BRGS admits students primarily from Bacup, Rawtenstall and the surrounding areas. Year 7 places are allocated based on student performance in the school’s entrance examination, which takes place in September. The school has approximately 180 Year 7 places each year.

 

The school organises an open evening event in June to give students and parents the opportunity to the visit the school in-person and meet staff members before applying for a place.

 

BRGS produces their own application guide, known as The Blue Booklet. The guide is made available to parents on the date of the open evening and can be downloaded from the school website here. The guide includes information regarding the school’s admission policy and contains important information about the application process.

 

In order to be considered for a place at the school, pupils must pass all elements of the entrance exam. However, the school website does state that passing the 11 Plus exam isn’t a guarantee of admission.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School

 

In order to apply for 11 Plus entry to the school, parents need to complete a registration form, which is made available on the school website from September. Additionally, the school’s Common Application From (CAF) needs to be completed online on the school’s website. The CAF for BRGS can be found here.

 

Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Each year, the school publishes its exam format in The Blue Book, which includes a guide to the entrance examination. In previous years, the exam has taken the format of:

 

  • A Maths paper
  • A Verbal Reasoning Paper
  • An English paper.

 

The Maths test lasts for 50 minutes and contains 50 multiple choice questions. The Verbal Reasoning test also lasts for 50 minutes and has 80 multiple choice questions. The English paper lasts for 45 minutes and contains 56 multiple choice questions. The English element of the exam contains two extracts of text with questions relating to the topic. There are also additional questions designed to test spelling, punctuation and grammar.

 

How to Prepare for the Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The key to studying for the 11 Plus exam is to prepare early. The sooner you can establish a study timetable with your child, the more time they’ll have to improve on any weak areas. At Exam Papers Plus, we believe in the ‘little but often’ approach to revision to ensure that your child doesn’t become overwhelmed by the whole experience.

 

One of the most effective ways to chart your child’s progress is to use practice exam papers. If you introduce practice papers early, you’ll get a good indication of your child’s strengths and weaknesses and you’ll have an overview of the elements your child may need to improve before the exam.

 

In the months leading up to the test, re-introduce the practice test papers to see how your child has improved. It’s also a good idea to do timed papers, so your child gets used to answering questions quickly, within the designated exam time.

 

We have several 11+ practice tests that can help your child prepare for the BRGS 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources, specifically designed for 11+ GL Assessment exams, like that of Bacup and Rawtenstall Grammar School:

 

 

The information provided about Bacup & Rawtenstall Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+

Screenshot of Aylesbury Grammar School website

Founded in 1598, Aylesbury Grammar School is located in the county of Buckinghamshire and currently educates around 1260 boys. Commonly referred to as AGS, the school used to be co-educational but became a Boys Grammar in 1959. The girls moved to a separate site which became Aylesbury High School. Aylesbury Grammar still has close links with the high school and the two often meet for events.

 

For a general overview of the school, check out this promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Aylesbury Grammar School

 

Address: Aylesbury Grammar School, Walton Road, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP21 7RP

County: Buckinghamshire

Admissions Info: office@ags.bucks.sch.uk, 01296 484545

School Type: Boys School

Number of pupils: 1,283 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 180

Open Day Date: September

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM Durham University

 

Aylesbury Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admission to the school in Year 7 is dependent on students attaining the required score in the Secondary Transfer Test, or being deemed qualified by the Selection Review Panel. Children who attend a primary school in Buckinghamshire will prepare for the exam by taking a Preparation Test at their school.

 

The Prep Test helps pupils familiarise themselves with the layout of the exam and gives them an indication of the types of questions they could be asked. The Preparation Test lasts around 35 minutes, which is shorter than the actual Transfer Test.  Children who do not attend primary school in Buckinghamshire are invited to take the Prep Test at one of the grammar schools.

 

If your child doesn’t achieve the required score in the exam due to exceptional circumstances, you may apply for a Selection Review. The Review is made up of a panel, approved by the Local Authority and will consider each individual case on its own merit. Reviews will take place before any allocations to Buckinghamshire grammar schools are made.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Aylesbury Grammar School

 

Registration for the Aylesbury Transfer Test happens automatically. If your child attends a Buckinghamshire primary school, they will automatically be put forward for the exam, unless you express otherwise.

 

In instances where students don’t attend a primary school in the county, or attend a Buckinghamshire independent school, parents need to apply for the test through the Testing Administrator.Parents should also notify their local authority of their child’s preferred school before the closing date.

 

Aylesbury Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Aylesbury Grammar 11 Plus exam consists of two tests that last approximately 50 minutes each. They comprise of elements of numeracy, verbal reasoning and non-verbal reasoning. Final marks are determined by adding the scores from each test together and using an age standardised conversion to ensure that no students have an unfair advantage due to their age.

 

How to Prepare for the Aylesbury Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

The longer your child has to prepare for the 11 Plus exam, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas. At Exam Papers Plus, we advise that it’s best to start preparation early with a ‘little but often’ approach.

 

We believe that one of the most effective ways to kick-start your child’s eleven plus revision is to use practice exam papers. Initially, the papers will give you a good indication of your child’s current level, and as their studying progresses, the papers will help you chart their progress.

 

As the exam gets nearer, we’d advise that you encourage your child to do timed papers under exam conditions, so that they get used to answering questions quickly. The more timed papers your child completes in the lead up to the test, the more their time management skills will improve.

 

We have several 11+ practice papers that can help your child prepare for the Aylesbury Grammar 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Aylesbury Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+

Screenshot of Ashlawn School website

Founded in 1985, Ashlawn School (formerly Dunsmore School) is a partially selective secondary school located in Rugby, Warwickshire. One of only 7 bilateral schools in the UK, Ashlawn specialises in Computing, Science and Leadership.

 

Ashlawn is one of very few schools to have been granted status as a National Teaching School. OFSTED rates the school as ‘outstanding’ and teachers from other schools often train at Ashlawn.

 

The school has approximately 1662 students and 90 full-time teaching staff. Recent additions to the school include a Sixth Form Centre and Teaching Studio, which was built thanks to a £2.6 million investment from the Education Funding Agency.

 

Ashlawn has a reputation for producing consistently good exam results and in January 2016, the school was named one of the best state schools based on GCSE and A Level results by Tatler Magazine.

 

For an insight into what it’s like in Year 7 at Ashlawn School, take a look at this video made by the students:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Ashlawn School

 

Address: Ashlawn School, Ashlawn Road, Hillmorton, Rugby, CV22 5ET

County: Warwickshire

Admissions Info: info@ashlawn.org.uk, 01788 573425

School Type: Mixed grammar

Number of pupils: 1,662 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 90 selective places

Open Day Date: June/July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

Ashlawn School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admissions to Ashlawn school are handled by the Academy Trust, who admit students in consultation with Warwickshire Local Authority. To be eligible to apply for a place at Ashlawn, parents are required to register their child by returning the 11 Plus Registration Form and naming the school on the Common Application Form.

 

Admissions are based on student performance in the two test papers as set by the University of Durham (CEM). Automatic qualifying scores are set and used by the Committee of Reference, based on exam performance that year. Students who achieve the qualifying score will receive an offer to their first-priority school, named on the CAF form.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Ashlawn School

 

In order to apply for entry to Ashlawn school, parents need to register their child to sit the 11 Plus exam. Parents are required to nominate the school in the Common Application Form, which is provided by the Local Authority, or can be completed online.

 

The school also recommends that students apply through the non-selective route and register to take the MFL Aptitude Tests. Although the MFL doesn’t form part of the selective criteria, it is used as part of the school’s oversubscription criteria. Students are welcome to apply to the school through both selective and non-selective routes.

 

The CAF from needs to be returned to the child’s home authority.

 

Parents living in Warwickshire should register their child through Warwickshire Admissions, whereas those living in other areas need to register with their home authority.

Late applications are welcomed although they are de-prioritized over applications that were made in time.

 

Ashlawn School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Ashlawn 11 Plus exam consists of two papers, each lasting approximately 50 minutes, covering Verbal Reasoning, Numeracy and Non-Verbal Reasoning. The questions are a mix of multiple choice and standard format.

 

The verbal reasoning test also includes an English component, consisting of a comprehension section and a ‘cloze test’, which focuses on passages of prose.

 

The numeracy test focuses on mathematical patterns, mental arithmetic and problem solving.

 

How to Prepare for the Ashlawn School 11 Plus Exam?

 

As with any exam, it’s best to start revising early. At Exam Papers Plus, we’ve written a series of articles that focus on preparing for the 11 Plus test, some of which include:

 

 

Initially, we advise that students sit a couple of practice exam papers at home, so that you can see at what level they’re currently performing. Not only do practice papers help to identify strengths and weaknesses, but they can help your child get used to the exam layout.

 

As their studying progresses, you can re-introduce the practice tests to see how they’re improving. In the lead up to the exam, we recommend doing timed practice tests to get your child used to answering the questions under exam conditions.

 

The practice papers that we produce come complete with answers, enabling you to accurately measure your child’s performance and track their improvements. We have several 11 plus practice papers that can help your child prepare for entry to Ashlawn School.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Ashlawn School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+

Screenshot of the Altrincham Grammar School for Girls website

Altrincham Grammar School for Girls was founded in 1910 as part of the 1902 Education act. An all-girls’ school, Altrincham is the largest of all the single-sex grammar schools in England, with approximately 1,250 students.

 

The school is one of the highest achieving grammars in the country, has academy status and is recognised as a language college. Students consistently achieve good exam results and, in recent years, the school has had a 100% GCSE pass rate.

 

For an insight into life at the school, check out this Leavers Video created by the students:

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Altrincham Grammar School for Girls

 

Address: Altrincham Grammar School for Girls, Cavendish Road, Bowdon, Altrincham, WA14 2NL

County: Cheshire

Admissions Info: admissions@aggs.bfet.uk, 0161 912 5912

School Type: Girls’ School

Number of pupils: 1,258 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 175

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

Altrincham Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Altrincham Grammar School for Girls is responsible for its own admissions. Specific arrangements for the entrance exam will be posted on the school website from April. Most girls apply for Year 7 entry to the school although sometimes girls will be accepted in Year 6 prior to the entrance exam, on the condition that they achieve a qualifying score of 360 or above. Decisions on the year of entry are made by the school on an individual basis.

 

The admissions arrangements are announced in the local press every year, as are the exam dates and venues. The entrance exam is age-standardised, so that no student has an advantage based on their age.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Altrincham Grammar School for Girls

 

In order to apply for a place at the school, parents need to register their daughters for the school’s entrance examination. A link to the registration form is made available on the school’s admissions page from April until June.

 

Further information about registration can be obtained from the Headteachers of all primary schools in the catchment area and an Open Evening is held for prospective parents over the summer.

 

The school encourages parents to contact the admissions department on 0161 912 5912 if they have any questions.

 

In addition to completing the registration form, parents also need to complete a Local Authority Common Preference Form. It’s important that Altrincham Grammar School for Girls is listed on the form in ranked order of preference. Late applications can be considered but only after all other applications have been ranked.

 

Upon receiving an offer, students also need to provide evidence of Date of Birth and residency.

 

Altringham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam at Altrincham Grammar School for Girls consists of two test papers covering:

 

  • Verbal Reasoning
  • Non-Verbal Reasoning
  • Numerical Reasoning

 

Each paper lasts approximately one hour and contains a mix of multipl-choice and standard format questions. The papers aim to assess students’ levels of verbal, non-verbal and maths skills. There will be a short break between the two papers.

 

The results of the entrance exam are posted in October. In order for your daughter to gain a place at the school, she will need a qualifying score of 334.

 

How to Prepare for the Altrincham Grammar School for Girls 11 Plus Exam?

 

We’ve previously written an in-depth guide to studying for the 11 Plus exam, which covers all the essential information you’ll need for creating a revision plan. We’ve also published specific posts about the individual tests, including:

 

 

As with any type of exam preparation, it’s always best to start early. At Exam Papers Plus, we recommend using practice exam papers to obtain a general overview of your child’s current abilities and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

 

As their studying progresses, you can re-introduce the practice tests to see how they’re improving. In the lead up to the exam, we recommend doing timed practice tests, to get your child used to answering the questions under exam conditions.

 

The practice papers that we produce come complete with answers, enabling you to accurately measure your child’s performance and track their improvements. We have several eleven plus practice papers that can help your child prepare for entry to Altrincham Grammar School for Girls.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Altrincham Grammar School for Girls was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+

Screenshot of the Altrincham Grammar School for Boys website

Altrincham Grammar School for Boys was originally founded in 1912 under the Balfour Education Act. T school is fully selective. Initially, Altrincham had foundation school status with some independence from the local authority. In 2011, the school was granted academy status. Altrincham Grammar for Boys has recently seen some new additions to its facilities, including ICT suites, Art and Design blocks, a new Hall, a Food Technology room and a gym, to name a few.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Altrincham Grammar School for Boys

 

Address: Altrincham Grammar School for Boys, Marlborough Road, Bowdon, Altrincham, WA14 2RS

County: Cheshire

Admissions Info: agsbadmin@agsb.co.uk, 0161 928 0858

School Type: Boys’ School

Number of pupils: 1,230 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 175

Open Day Date: June

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: GL Assessment (NFER)

 

Altrincham Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admissions to Altrincham Grammar School for Boys in Year 7 is based on performance in the entrance examination. All admissions arrangements are published on the school website prior to registration opening.

 

In such instances where there is an increase in the number of admissions, the local authority will be notified and the details will be updated on the admissions page of the school website.

 

Parents are notified of the outcome of their application by the local authority, on National Offer Day, which usually occurs in early March. If your child is offered a place at the school, you must accept the offer with the local authority. Once a place has been accepted, the school will send more details about their Transition Day, Induction Evening, school uniform arrangements, etc.

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Altrincham Grammar School for Boys

 

In order to apply for a Year 7 place at the school, parents need to register their child for the entrance examination, which takes in place September. Registration is done online using the school’s online application form, which can be downloaded here. The form is available on the school website from March and parents usually have until July to register. Additionally, the school holds Parent Information Evenings in March to provide more information on the application process.

 

In addition to completing the online application, parents also need to complete a Common Application Form (CAF) with the local authority. The school will send you the form by post, which also provides details of the examination. It’s important that Altrincham Grammar is listed as your son’s first priority school on the form, otherwise an offer cannot be guaranteed, even with suitable test scores. Students also need to bring the CAF form with them on the day of the exam. The school also requires a passport photograph of your child.

 

Altrincham Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus Exam Format

 

Altrincham Grammar uses test papers created by the GL Assessment 11 Plus exam board. which was previously known as the National Federation of Educational Research (NFER). The exam consists of:

 

 

The Creative Writing paper is used to test students’ abilities to write clearly and accurately and will be used as part of the school’s internal application procedure. Test scores for the 11 Plus exam are age-standardised, which means they take into account the child’s date of birth.

 

How to Prepare for the Altrincham Grammar School for Boys 11 Plus Exam?

 

When it comes to preparing for the 11 Plus exam, it’s best to start early. The sooner your child starts preparing, the more time they’ll have to improve any weak areas. At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that one of the best ways to get ready for the eleven plus is to practice with exam papers.

 

Not only do they help your child familiarise themselves with the layout of the exam and get them used to the types of questions they may be asked, but practice papers can help improve a student’s time management skills.

 

Our practice exam papers come complete with answers, so you can easily monitor your child’s progress as they embark on their study routine. We have several 11+ practice papers that can help your child prepare for Altrincham Grammar 11 Plus exam.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Altrincham Grammar School for Boys was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+

Photo of a pen on a test paper

The new contract for the 11 plus exam in Buckinghamshire has been awarded to GL Assessment rather than CEM, the current providers. The new GL test will cover Verbal Reasoning, Non-Verbal Reasoning and Mathematics. This is for 2019 entry onwards so students taking the Bucks 11+ exam for 2018 entry will still be assessed in the CEM format.

 

It’s an interesting turn of events and adds credence to the theory that GL is making a comeback in the 11 plus market, having lost significant market share to CEM over the last few years.

 

Regardless, we have specific resources designed for both CEM and GL style exams, so we have you covered either way!

 

See our full 11+ range here.

 

You can learn more about the difference between CEM and GL here.

 

You can read the full press release here.

 

The Bucks 11+ schools are:

Aylesbury Grammar School (Boys)

Aylesbury High School (Girls)

Beaconsfield High School (Girls)

Burnham Grammar School

Chesham Grammar School

Dr. Challoner’s Grammar School (Boys)

Dr. Challoner’s High School (Girls)

John Hampden Grammar School (Boys)

Royal Grammar School (Boys)

Royal Latin Grammar School

Sir Henry Floyd Grammar School

Sir William Borlase Grammar School

Wycombe High School (Girls)

 

Image credit:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/compassrose_04/6734365391/

 

Posted on in 7+, 10+, 11+, 13+

Boy sitting on a sofa playing

This article was written by a parent whose children gained 7+ and 11+ entry to St. Paul’s Juniors (formerly Colet Court) and King’s College Wimbledon. It’s packed with honest and valuable insight into the preparation, examination and interview process, and contains plenty of practical wisdom and advice. If you are planning for your child to sit a competitive entrance exam, this article should prove beneficial.

 

Our family has made it through two fairly onerous Christmas periods preparing for the arduous 7+, 10+ and 11+ exams, and with a measure of sanity intact! I wanted to share our experiences and hopefully help other parents in a similar position.  The positive news is all that time and effort invested is worthwhile; however, it requires commitment and focus from willing participants. I aim to be very detailed in this article as I benefited a lot from hearing about other people’s experiences. Some parts may not be relevant to you, so can be glossed over. However, I hope you will find something in my ‘thesis’ valuable for you and your child if embarking on this journey.

 

With the 7+ (and 8+ exams), I would recommend making a rational judgement as to whether your child is truly ready for the experience. I’ve seen and heard about boys in these age groups panicking, crying, even vomiting before or during these exams. Even more worrying is seeing worked up parents actually pushing kids into examination classrooms; it’s heart-breaking.

 

My older son, Ned, was definitely not ready for either the 7+ or 8+ selection process and as he was at a school that finished at eleven, we felt no rush. On the other hand, my younger son, George, has a very different personality; he is quite mature for his age, confident, pretty resilient and very competitive. He was 100% ready and super keen.

 

7+ Experience

George was at the same school as Ned, where they don’t prepare for the 7+, unlike many other schools, where a significant pool of boys taking these very competitive exams come from, did. George’s teacher was supportive and set him some more advanced work and homework. However, as candidates are required to be at least a year (I’d heard even two years) ahead of the National Curriculum, we decided to find a tutor for George who was experienced in understanding exactly what he needed to learn. She understood the 7+ process across many key schools which was invaluable. We didn’t want to overdo it, but wanted to make him confident and secure in his abilities. So for about nine months George had an hour of tutoring a week during term-time before the 7+ exams. This was definitely helpful. It kept him focused, engaged and provided us with feedback, but I knew as the exam dates started to loom, we needed to do more on the weekends and during the holidays too. I’d heard of children having tutoring several nights during the week for two hour sessions or doing three hours on a Saturday morning in small targeted groups…and some of these kids were at schools that DID prepare for 7+. We didn’t want to do that.

 

There is a plethora of 7+ materials out there, it can be daunting. My saviour was stumbling across the Exam Papers Plus website. They know exactly what these schools’ expectations are and the type of questions that candidates will come up against in maths, literacy and reasoning. Their practice papers are spot on. In the beginning it can be overwhelming as there is a lot of material to work through. I’d recommend commencing the papers around four to six months before D-Day. I didn’t worry about timing him at the start, we worked up to this. Having the answers is also an extra bonus for parents!

 

George did every single EPP 7+ paper available as well as Bond papers at home for extra VR and NVR practice. Maths was his strength, so I focused more on literacy and reasoning. The objective was not to overdo it on weekends and in the school holidays, so I made up a plan of attack based on what I knew he could deal with, ensuring we’d cover off the necessary areas over a reasonable timeframe. George is conscientious, quite disciplined and very competitive, traits that come in handy for 7+ preparation. He was keen to see his marks progress on an upward trajectory and for the most part buckled down when required. He was still a little boy though who had a life outside of this, so I had to be realistic. Some days he just wasn’t in the mood and we’d skip that day. Time was on our side and I didn’t want him to burn-out.

 

The other key aspect behind his success, other than the EPP papers, was the EPP mock exams.

I cannot recommend these highly enough. George did a few other mocks during the year but they were not challenging or relevant enough (for the schools he was going for). The EPP 7+ mock exams were well timed, starting in the latter part of the year. They best simulate the actual exams these schools will dish up on the day, not just in terms of the content, but more importantly, in the disciplined exam environment and timings. Doing an exam for the first time, and at such a young age can be unnerving, so this experience was great preparation. If possible I’d recommend doing as many as there are available. George did three mocks sprinkled between late November and early January. I discovered they book up quickly so you need to get onto it fast to secure a place. Feedback from the mocks is provided very quickly, is detailed and highly valuable. With George’s current school situation I didn’t have a true indication of where he sat amongst the fierce competition, so this was useful as a benchmark.The calibre of children sitting EPP mocks is generally high (these are obviously families in the know), so as the feedback included not only George’s scores but the average and range of the group across each subject, we could build a realistic picture of where he actually sat. The highly personalised feedback pinpointed areas he needed to work on. His scores improved with each mock, which further built his confidence and gave me comfort that we weren’t being delusional. Time and money well spent!

 

George only did two 7+ exams, Kings College School (KCS) and Colet Court (now St Paul’s Juniors). Logistics, perceived fit and a bit of gut feel helped shape these choices. He originally preferred KCS but after a second visit to St. Paul’s Juniors (SPJ) this switched; maybe it was the green space, the close proximity to home and a bit of an instinct for him.

 

When it came to the first step for KCS exam and interview in late October, George was as ready as he could be. We had done some prep at home, all the basics (eg about hobbies, why KCS, his favourite book etc.) They did the interview in pairs, and he was with a boy from Squirrels. George is good at downloading details of interviews, exams and so on to me afterwards. We could never have predicted the type of material they covered. It included a lot of hypothetical questions with no right or wrong answer. A few examples included: 

“Would you rather be born with an elephant trunk or a giraffe’s neck?” 

“From now on would you rather be able to shout or to whisper?”, “Would you rather be three foot tall or eight foot tall”? Not any we prepared for at home! Clearly the boys needed to have a rational response they could back-up, there was no right or wrong answer. He was also shown a picture of a family getting ready to go on holiday and asked questions requiring inference. The favourite book question did come up however, but as a twist, he was asked to describe it using only three adjectives. They asked the boys what their parents did for a living. (Not sure why George mentioned my frequent visits to Starbucks!?)

 

George enjoyed the activity day at KCS in November following the interview. I know there were some cutting exercises using scissors and some maths games. KCS was his first 7+ exam in early January. (This exam now takes place in December). My take-away was they were focused on literacy with a fair amount of inference required. The composition was a picture of a small boy by a railway station with a scooter, on which the boys had to base their story. Through our storywriting prep at home, we had a checklist of what George needed to include eg lots of description, adverbs, use of dialogue, similes, strong endings, mix of short and longer sentences, and NOT to use the ‘s’ word, ie ‘said’. I had made up cards for adjectives, adverbs, alternatives to the word ‘said’, similes, type of punctuation to use. These were gold. George told me he wrote a full page for his story (the boys were told they weren’t allowed to go over a page).

 

One of EPP’s 7+ literacy packs I’d bought provided a whole range of essay topics which was great, as it meant he could write a variety of stories, whilst putting to use everything we’d talked about that needed to go into a story…..back to the cards. Children sometimes regurgitate stories in an exam even if not completely relevant to the topic. I believe variety and creativity is key so they are prepared to answer any question that comes up.

 

George’s experience at St Paul’s Junior was different. There was no activity day and after the exam, interviews were only offered to 80 boys who scored highly enough in the written papers. George found the exam easier than KCS, especially the literacy part, which included a multiple-choice comprehension. The story was also based on a picture, a box. George came out of the SPJ exam absolutely buzzing. A good sign! We received a phone call the next day, a Saturday, to say he had an interview which was exciting. That interview was with four other boys and the Headmaster. He involved them all in the questions. He asked what they liked to do outside of school and if they had seen anything in the news recently that interested them. George jumped at that thanks to my older son mentioning only the day before some news about Tim Peake and his trip to the International Space Station. The group of boys then disappeared for about an hour with two teachers to do some maths and literacy activities. I’m sure their interaction in a group situation was observed. Whilst that went on, parents were either in a meeting with the Headmaster or sitting in the conference room with the other parents and a few older SPJ boys to answer any questions we might have. My meeting (husband was away) with the Headmaster was very casual and I found him and the experience encouraging. Despite having only about 15 minutes with George and the four other boys, he seemed to have him pegged, in a good way. So all in all, it was a positive experience.

 

His hard work and determination paid off. George was offered places at both King’s and St. Paul’s Juniors. We loved both schools but due to logistics, the green space, his preference and our overall gut feel, we chose St. Paul’s Juniors It wasn’t easy giving up a place at KCS, but he could only go to one school. We were and are immensely proud of him and all his efforts!

 

George started SPJ last September and is absolutely thriving. People often have preconceived ideas about the school. It is academic and challenging but in a good way. These boys are there because they have proved themselves and want to be there. I’ve found it a busy but happy environment. I have met a lot of lovely parents and families from all walks of life. Som boys travel quite a distance to be there, even the younger ones. There is so much on offer across a broad spectrum for all boys and this creates a real buzz. The school wants boys to skip into school every day and drag their feet at home time; that’s my son and he loves it! I believe George’s natural curiosity, maturity, confidence and potential helped him secure a place at a school perfect for him.

 

10+ Experience

My older son Ned was a different story. His grades had been improving over the years and he had become a strong mathematician. He’s mature for his age but much quieter than his younger brother and quite self-contained. Ned’s also a very sporty boy, whereas George is much more of an all-rounder. I would say he’s quietly confident and competitive and was ready when he sat the 10+ deferred exam at Hampton School in Year 5. 

He prepared by doing the EPP 10+ papers which were extremely helpful.

 Unfortunately at the time EPP didn’t offer a 10+ mock exam, but he did a few others elsewhere which helped to prepare him for the exam environment. He handled the Hampton exam very calmly and came out of it quite happy. It was a very maths-focused exam. There was no interview at 10+ deferred. Ned was offered a place at Hampton for entry into Yr7 in 2017 and we were all delighted. He was feeling quite confident, but on reflection, maybe a little too content. That exam was in November, his next 10+ exam at KCS was in the following January. He was a bit over the study by this stage, and it was a little tricky to fire him up; and having such a big break between the exams was unfortunate. This period was stressful, as George was also preparing for the 7+ exams and Christmas just sort of came and went. Ned really liked Hampton, especially the sporting aspect, so he wasn’t as disciplined preparing for KCS 10+, he knew he already had a Hampton place in his ‘back-pocket’ and dropped the ball a bit.

 

Ned did the 10+ activity day and exam (a few days apart) at KCS in early January. When he came out of the exam with glazed eyes I knew it wasn’t a good sign. The comprehension proved difficult for him. I wasn’t surprised when he didn’t get an interview and the feedback confirmed his literacy, notably the comprehension, let him down. He hadn’t answered questions worth a significant amount of marks. In hindsight he probably shouldn’t have sat this exam, they only take a small handful of boys. It was a lesson learnt. However looking back it was the best possible outcome for him (more on that later).

 

To this day I believe securing the Hampton 10+ place was one of the best outcomes for Ned, it really built his confidence. His Headteacher was still keen for him to sit other schools and prepare for the 11+ as part of his Yr 6 cohort and we agreed. What else would he do for the next nine months? It was hard to get motivated, as I still felt drained from the 7+/10+ combo and Ned was happy to go to Hampton in Yr 7 and have no more exam prep. However, we wanted to keep him driven and engaged, so agreed he would only do three schools for the 11+: Hampton 11+ for an academic scholarship, (even if he had a bad day his 10+ deferred spot was 100% secure);.St Paul’s Juniors’ 11+, (with George there, the logistics made sense); and he’d try KCS again.

 

11+ Experience – The Finale

Ned’s school obviously did prepare them at 11+ and he had a lot of school homework to do so we needed to be efficient with what we did at home. As literacy was his weaker subject, he needed to put more focus on his stories and comprehension responses. His marks were steadily improving at school, but we also enlisted the help of a tutor, an hour a week during term time, focusing on literacy. The tutor and Ned clicked and I think she really helped strengthen his English. We also worked at home on weekends and in the holidays, around his school workload, on maths, English and reasoning. We probably spent about 55-60% of time on English. I made up a study plan which he stuck to quite well. We made up a checklist for his literacy, more sophisticated than that used for George. It included examples of strong descriptive words, similes, metaphors, juxtaposition, alliteration, onomatopoeia and more. I encouraged him to read a range of books to help further build his vocabulary. I purchased all the relevant EPP 11+ papers, some very challenging but also very relevant. We used past papers from Manchester Grammar and Dulwich College, which are available online. Ned did the two available EPP 11+ mocks, again very challenging and even though his results were not as good as we’d hoped for, it was beneficial to see where he sat amongst the bright group of 11+ candidates. We had to remind ourselves it was all relative.

 

In mid-December Ned attended a full day at KCS to try out for a sports scholarship. He is a very sporty boy, a strong all-rounder, but most skilled in cricket and football. The day consisted of playing many different sports, some he’s not played much of (eg rugby), timed sprints and agility tests. It was his idea of heaven! I was told they also look for future potential. There is no limit to sports scholar awardees, BUT each boy needs to pass the academic exam. There were 73 boys in total. Ned was very keen to do it, and we thought in a very competitive and bright bunch of boys, it might help differentiate him, even if just marginally. The Head of Sport from his current school wrote him a very strong reference, but his performance on the day was all down to him. You do not get told if your son has been put forward unless they pass the test and KCS decides to award him a sports scholarship.

 

Over the Christmas period we made sure Ned had plenty of breaks and fun outings to keep him fresh which worked well. 

When we did 11+ prep I mixed it up between the different subjects and various papers I’d printed off (only a few forests). I kept a record of his scores so I could track his progress. With literacy, I sometimes gave him guidance to keep him on track. The literacy focus paid off as the quality of his work flourished; it was very satisfying for us both.

 

Poor Ned, his exams were very spread out again. He sat the St Paul’s ISEB exam (an online exam) in November, with about 360 boys. He did very well and got through to the next round of about 110 boys for written papers in early February. EPP’s sister company, Pretest Plus, offered two ISEB Pretest practice tests online, these were gold. 

Ned said they were just like the online test SPJ served up on the day.

 

Ned then did the Hampton 11+ exam in very early January. He and his friends commented that the maths was particularly hard and time pressured which wasn’t a surprise, as it’s known for being a school that focuses on maths. They also said the reasoning was a little unusual, they were not specific but did say it wasn’t really like the reasoning they’d done before. The literacy was pretty straightforward.

 

The KCS 11+ exam in mid-January was a much better experience for Ned this time round. I think about 360 boys sat it. Maths was the most challenging, again no surprise, and fortunately the literacy seemed OK. The comprehension was about Tom Sawyer, which he had read the year before, a nice bonus. My husband said he came out with a big smile on his face, no glazed eyes this time. Ned felt positive.

 

Ned was invited to Hampton for a meet and greet/interview with a teacher as part of the 10+ cohort just after the KCS exam. He hadn’t been invited for an interview for an academic scholarship, but they wanted to meet with these 10+ boys again which I thought was a nice touch. It was a fairly casual 20 minute chat, one on one with a teacher which was a good experience for him, as the only other interview he’d done, other than practice at home, was a mock interview at school the previous October. The teacher showed him a few pictures eg Trump outside the Kremlin and he had to discuss. Whilst this was going on, parents were in the Headmaster’s office for a general chat and Q&A session. It was informal and friendly. Ned hadn’t had much contact with Hampton since the 10+ deferred exam (about 14 months prior) other than a taster session he’d attended not long after he received his 10+ offer, so he enjoyed this interaction and it remained his number one choice.

 

The day after this, I was ecstatic to receive a text from Hampton (worse than waiting for the post, as timing can be so random) to say they would like Ned to come in for an interview that coming Saturday, four days away. I rushed out to buy The Week Junior to ensure he was up to date on current affairs, plus we did some practice questions at home as usual. Not always that helpful though as interview content seems to be so varied at 11+.

 

Ned went along to the interview on the Saturday morning calm and composed. The whole process was very well organized. About five boys were taken off by a 6th former to meet with individual teachers for about 20 minutes. Parents sat in the Great Hall where they served tea, coffee, biscuits etc. It all felt very hospitable. We knew our son was meeting with a lady who taught history (we checked on their website as we’d been given her name) but that was it. When he came out later than everyone else, we didn’t know if it was a good or bad sign. He was happy though and thought it had gone well. The teacher had covered off some maths problems with him, he read a passage and she asked him questions about a picture (he had two to choose from). She gently prompted him for more possible answers to her questions about the crazy man swimming in a moat around his house in the rain. I’d been advised this might happen, as interviewers are looking for a candidate’s ability to think logically and rationally on the spot. The teacher also asked him about what he enjoyed doing outside of school, his favourite author and what book he was currently reading. 

I found it encouraging she was interested in him as a person and not only his academic ability.

 I believe they interviewed 120 boys for around 40-44 places.

 

The final piece of the puzzle was the SPJ 11+ exam, round two. I had heard that about 110 boys were invited back to sit this exam and we knew it was going to be tough. There were a lot of determined looking boys and parents milling around. Maths was hard as expected and Faisal from EPP had warned me that the last section of the paper would be extremely difficult (this was simulated in their mock exams) but to give it a go and show all your workings. He was not offered an interview for 11+ but was for 13+ (my husband had also chosen this option). That interview was to be held on the last day of half term.

 

Before the SPJ interview, on the last day of school before half term, Ned received an offer for KCS. We were doubly thrilled as he was also offered a Sports Scholarship, utopia for him. 

We were so proud of him, all his hard work had paid off and we felt he really deserved it.

 

Ned attended his St Paul’s 13+ interview where he did some maths and literacy with a senior teacher whilst we met with the Director of Admissions. Following this, Ned met with the Director of Admissions on his own for a few questions that were also academically focused. That was it. We were informed about a week later that he was on the Reserve List. This meant a few things that did not appeal to us. Firstly, he would need to move to a Prep school for two years, and that he would then need to do more exams in September 2018 to assess if he was able to move onto the Main list. If so, he would sit Common Entrance exams the following year. Despite all the benefits of him going to St Paul’s, there was no way we would put Ned through all that. He was now hell bent on going to KCS, the lure of a sports scholarship was extremely strong. We also felt KCS was the right school for him. He still really liked Hampton, but KCS had a clear edge. Therefore we very happily accepted KCS and he’ll start there as part of the Lower School (Year 7 & 8) in September this year. It means he’ll go straight into their senior school with about 50 other boys, enjoying brand new facilities and being taught by senior school staff. A wonderful result for Ned, we’re very proud of him.

 

With the process done and dusted, it felt a bit odd having spare time on my hands, especially at weekends. Some mums describe it as a bit of a post-exam void and I really get that. However that feeling doesn’t last long – relief quickly takes over! It’s been a long journey but rewarding for us. We’ve made it to the other side. Next Christmas we’ll be far far away, in the sun, with not a practice paper in site!

 

KEY LESSONS LEARNT

  • If your child is ready, academically and emotionally, for 7+ or 8+ go for it, odds are more in your favour.
  • The 10+ is a great option for boys who are ready, it might not result in an offer but the experience is valuable.
  • Make sure the school(s) you aim for are right for your child and family.
  • If your child doesn’t get offered a place at a school one year, it does not mean they won’t be successful at another entry point.
  • Steady progress is key with exam preparation.
  • Make up a realistic plan of attack, include frequent breaks and fun activities to keep them fresh and engaged.
  • Practice papers, practice papers, practice papers…incorporate variety and track results.
  • Mock exams, mock exams, mock exams…invaluable for feedback and benchmarking.
  • Focus on weaker areas, but don’t ignore other subjects.
  • A calm environment means greater productivity and a happier child.
  • Lots of encouragement, stay positive.
  • Keep things in perspective and maintain a sense of humour.
  • Potential bonus – parents may escape feeling that little bit sharper!

 

References and Resources:

 

King’s 7+ Exam

St. Paul’s Juniors (formerly Colet Court) 7+ Exam

7+ Practice Papers

10+ Practice Papers

11+ Practice Papers

Online Pretest Practice Tests

St. Paul’s Juniors (formerly Colet Court) 11+ exam

King’s College School

St. Paul’s Juniors

Hampton School

 

If you have any questions, or need some help and advice, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with us.

 

Header image: Flickr

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of Alcester Grammar School website

Alcester Grammar School is a mixed, selective grammar school. Originally established in 1499, the school was known as ‘Newport’s Free School’ before becoming Alcester Grammar in 1912. Located in Alcester, Warwickshire, it was the first in the area to achieve academy status.  

 

As with other grammar schools in Warwickshire, Alcester gives priority to pupils who live within a certain radius of the school. The school currently accepts students from specific locations running from Stratford-Upon-Avon to Long Compton.

 

Alcester Grammar has a reputation for producing excellent GCSE and A Level results.  In 2015, 99% of GCSE students achieved 5 or more A* -C grades in subjects including Maths and English. Previous OFSTED inspections have seen the school graded as Outstanding.

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Alcester Grammar School

 

Address: Alcester Grammar School, Birmingham Road, Alcester, B49 5ED

County: Warwickshire

Admissions Info: office@alcestergs.com, 01789 762 494

School Type: Mixed Grammar

Number of pupils: 943 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 120

Open Day: July

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: Warwickshire CEM 11 Plus (University of Durham)

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Alcester Grammar School

 

Warwickshire County Council’s Admissions Service, known as Warwickshire Admissions overseas 11 Plus entry to Alcester School. To apply for entry to the school in Year 7, parents need to register their child for the school’s entrance examination by completing the Common Application Form. The deadline for registration is usually in July ​ and the form needs to be handed in to the local authority. The school’s admissions document states that late registrations will not be considered in the first round of placements.

 

In addition to registering for the exam, Warwickshire Admissions require evidence of the child’s home address. Parents who live in Birmingham need to register for the 11 Plus exam with the grammar schools themselves, rather than the council.

 

Alcester Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The Alcester Grammar 11 Plus exam consists of two papers that last for approximately 50 minutes each. They contain a mix of standard format and multiple choice questions, covering the following subjects:

 

 

The Verbal reasoning exam also has an English component, which includes a comprehension and cloze test. The Maths exam involves a numeracy test, which tests for ability in mental arithmetic, and problem solving questions.

 

For each paper, students will be given a question booklet and a separate answer sheet, which is marked electronically for accuracy.

 

Alcester Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Admissions to grammar schools in Warwickshire and Birmingham are managed by ‘The Grammar Schools in Birmingham Consortium’. Both counties share the same test, which takes place on the same date.

 

Admission to Alcester in Year 7 is decided by the student’s performance in the Eleven Plus exam, in addition to them meeting the location criteria, as outlined above.

 

How to Prepare for the Alcester Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

As with all entrance tests, it’s best to start preparing early. Creating a revision timetable with your child will help make sure that they cover all the material they’ll need to know for the exam. At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that using practice exam papers early in a child’s revision is one of the most effective ways to get ahead. Not only do they help your child improve their time management skills, but they can also help identify their strengths and weaknesses.

 

The practice papers that we produce come complete with answers, enabling you to accurately measure your child’s performance and track their improvements in the lead up to the exam. We have several Eleven Plus practice papers that can help your child prepare for entry to Alcester Grammar.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

The information provided about Alcester Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

 

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Screenshot of the Adams Grammar School website

Founded in 1656, Adams Grammar School is a selective boys’ school offering day and boarding education in Newport, Shropshire. Currently accommodating around 800 pupils, the school celebrated its 350th year in 2006, which saw the completion of a performing arts centre and a new science block. The school has an increasing number of international students, especially from Hong Kong and is a specialist technology and language college.

 

Adams is regularly listed as one of the top 50 schools in the country and consistently produces good GCSE and A Level results. As a result, the school sees a high number of its graduates attend the Russell Group and Golden Triangle Universities.

 

For an insight into what it’s like to study at Adams Grammar School, take a look at this promotional video:

 

 

11 Plus Exam Information for Adams Grammar School

 

Address: Adams Grammar School, High Street, Newport, TF10 7BD

County: Shropshire

Admissions Info: registrar@adamsgs.org.uk, 01952 386300

School Type: Boys Grammar

Number of pupils: 800 (approx.)

Number of Places in Year 7: 115

Open Day: March

Exam Date: September

Exam Board Type: CEM (University of Durham): Shropshire, Walsall and Wolverhampton Consortium

 

How to Apply for 11 Plus Entry to Adams Grammar School

 

Applications for 11 Plus entry in Year 7 are completed online. Registration forms are posted on the school admissions page here from April until June. Two forms need to be completed for 11 Plus Entry: The Entrance Test Registration Form (online) and the Local Authority Form, also known as a Secondary School Preference Form. The latter document needs to be returned to the local authority directly by the deadline date specified on the form.

 

Adams Grammar School 11 Plus Exam Format

 

The 11 Plus exam for Adams follows the same structure as other grammar schools in the Wolverhampton and Wrekin region. The exam consists of

 

 

The four papers are split over two tests, each lasting 45 minutes, with each paper divided into individually timed sections.

 

Adams Grammar School 11 Plus Admissions

 

Most pupils who attend Adams Grammar, join in Year 7, although the school does admit pupils for both day and boarding in Years 8 and 9, if there are spaces available.

 

Parents can apply to the school regardless of their address in the UK, as places are awarded based on merit. Day places are determined based on student performance in the entrance examination, with boarding places decided based on the individual needs of the candidate.  Applications are open to UK, or EU passport holders.

 

How to Prepare for the Adams Grammar School 11 Plus Exam?

 

 

One of the most effective ways to prepare for the 11 Plus exam is to use practice exam papers. Not only do they help you identify your child’s strengths and weaknesses, but they can also help improve their time management skills.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, all of our practice papers come complete with answers, so you can accurately measure your child’s performance. We have a selection of 11 Plus exam papers to choose from to help your child prepare for entry to Adams Grammar.

 

We recommend the following resources:

 

 

 

The information provided about Adams Grammar School was believed to be correct at the time of publishing. However, please be aware of future changes. We advise you to contact the school directly if you are unsure of anything. School contact details are provided within the post.

Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Photo of two boys studying in the classroom

This article explains everything you need to know about the 11+ Kent Test, including:

  • A complete breakdown of the actual exam timings and question types
  • Sample Kent 11+ questions for all subjects
  • Expert tips and suggestions on how to prepare your child to pass the test with flying colours!

 

What is the Kent Test?

 

The Kent Test is an examination used to assess whether Year 7 grammar school entry is a suitable option for your child. It is used by most, but not all, of the 35 wholly selective and 4 partially selective grammar schools in the region.

 

When is the Kent Test taken?

 

The Kent exam is taken by students at the beginning of Year 6. This year, the test will be held on 7th September 2017 for students who go to school in Kent. It will be taken on 9th September 2017 by students who go to school outside of Kent.

 

How many candidates take the Kent Test?

 

Unfortunately, there are far more applications than places available at Kent grammar schools. In 2015, 14,486 students took the test and 6,259 passed. In 2016, 15,253 students took the test and 6,537 passed. The demand for places and number of applicants increases yearly.

 

What is covered in the Kent Test?

 

The examination consists of three separate assessments:

 

Section 1: This exam is 1 hour long and tests Reasoning. It is broken into three shorter sections addressing Verbal Reasoning, Spatial Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.

 

Section 2: This exam is 1 hour long and tests English and Mathematics.

 

Section 3: A writing task of 40 minutes, including 10 minutes of planning time. This is not marked and only used by Headteachers in borderline assessment cases.

 

Sections 1 and 2 of the Kent Test are multiple-choice examinations. Each question will have 5 answer choices and your child will need to mark their responses on a separate answer sheet. Your child will need to draw a line through the correct answer on a grid like this:

 

Kent 11 Plus Test Answer Grid

 

What is Verbal Reasoning and how is it tested in the Kent 11+ exam?

 

Verbal Reasoning questions can contain words, letters and numbers and assess the relationship amongst and between them.

 

The Kent 11 plus Verbal Reasoning assessment begins with a timed 10-minute practice section. This will be followed by a 20-minute Verbal Reasoning exam. There will be roughly 32 questions in this section, which means students will have around 40 seconds to answer each question. Speed is, therefore, of the essence!

 

The Verbal Reasoning exam will contain various different question types. For example, it may contain 4 different types of VR problems, each tested with 8 questions.

 

Here are a few example 11+ Verbal Reasoning questions:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning Question 1

11 plus Verbal Reasoning Question 2 11 plus Kent Verbal Reasoning Question 3 Kent 11 plus Verbal Reasoning Questions 4

 

What is Non-Verbal Reasoning and how is it tested in the Kent 11+ exam?

 

Non-Verbal Reasoning questions assess the relationships between shapes, such as their similarities, differences and sequence.

 

The Kent 11 plus exam contains a series of short NVR tests, each lasting 4-5 minutes. There will most likely be 3 short NVR subtests in total. Each subtest will focus on a different question type and be preceded by an untimed practice section. There will be 8-10 questions in each section, so your child will have roughly 30 seconds to answer each question.

 

Becoming familiar with the question types beforehand is the key to success. We’ve included a few sample questions below:

 

Analogy

how to prepare for kent 11 plus NVR section

 

Codes

Kent NVR exam test question 11 plus

 

 

Sequences

11+ Kent Sample Test Question Non-Verbal Reasoning

 

Odd One Out

11+ Kent Sample Non-Verbal Reasoning Question

 

What is Spatial Reasoning and how is it tested in the Kent 11+ exam?

 

Spatial Reasoning assesses how well a student can manipulate shapes and space in their head.

 

The 11+ Kent Test contains a series of short Spatial Reasoning tests, each lasting 4-5 minutes. There will probably be 2 Spatial Reasoning subtests. Each of them will focus on a different type of skill and will have an untimed practice section preceding it. There will be between 8 and 10 questions in each subtest, giving the student about 30 seconds to answer each question.

 

Below you will find an example of each of the two main Spatial Reasoning question types that may be used in the Kent 11 plus test:

 

Figure Recognition

11+ Kent Spatial Reasoning Sample Question

 

Figure Analysis

Kent 111 plus Test Sample Spatial Reasoning Test

 

How is Mathematics tested in the 11 plus Kent test?

 

The Maths test in the Kent 11+ exam is 25 minutes long and is preceded by a 5-minute practice section. It will most likely contain 25 questions, so your child will have 1 minute to answer each question. The test will cover topics learnt up to the beginning of Year 6 but will also contain a series of more trickier problems.

 

Here are a few sample Maths questions that are at the Kent 11+ standard:

 

Kent 11 plus Maths Sample Question

 

11 plus Kent Maths Sample Question 2

 

 

Maths 11 plus Kent Sample

 

How is English tested in the 11 plus Kent test?

 

The English test begins with a 5-minute practice section followed by a 25-minute exam. The test will most likely contain 24 or 25 questions, so your child will roughly have 1 minute to answer each question.

 

The Kent 11+ English exam will contain a short reading comprehension. Your child will need to read a passage and answer a series of questions based on it. There will also be questions that test Cloze skills, where the student must choose which word best completes a sentence, as well as questions that test spelling, punctuation and grammar.

 

Here are a few sample 11+ Kent style English questions:

11 plus English Kent Exam sample Questions

What can I do to help my child pass the Eleven Plus Kent Test?

 

As with most things in life, practice makes perfect! The Kent exam is time pressured and the key to doing well is answering the questions quickly and accurately. The best way to increase speed and accuracy is to familiarise your child with the content of the test and the various question types they will have to deal with. This way, they will approach the exam with confidence as they will know what to expect and what is expected of them.

 

How can Exam Papers Plus help?

 

We produce highly accurate and effective exam practice papers and have an excellent track record in helping children succeed in their 11+ exams. Our range of tried and tested resources will help your child ace the Kent 11 plus exam!

Keep reading for our specialist recommendations.

 

Recommendations: Verbal Reasoning

We’ve created 2 Verbal Reasoning Packs that each contain 4 full-length practice papers. These include examples of all the various different question types that could come up in the Kent 11+ Test. The practice tests are timed (equating to 40 seconds per question) so your child can get used to dealing with these types of questions under time pressure, just like they will need to in the Kent examination. Answers included. Available for immediate download so you can start your preparation right away.

 

Click on these packs to learn more and buy:

 

11+ Verbal Reasoning Pack 1. Ideal Practice for GL Assessment VR exams, including the 11 plus Kent Test. GL Assessment style Grammar School 11+ exams       11 plus Verbal Reasoning Exam Practice Papers

 

Recommendations: Non-Verbal Reasoning

We’ve created a Non-Verbal Reasoning Pack that contains 3 full-length practice papers. This pack covers all of the question types that could come up in the Kent 11+ Test. The practice tests are timed (equating to 30 seconds per question) and broken down into small sections, exactly like in the Kent Test. Answers and answer sheets of the same style as in the Kent Test are included. Available for immediate download so you can start your preparation right away.

 

Click on the pack below to learn more and buy:

 

11+ practice NVR papers for GL Assessment and Independent School examinations

 

Recommendations: Mathematics

We have 2 Mathematics Pack that contain multiple-choice questions similar to those found in the Kent 11 plus exam. Each pack contains 4 full-length exam papers that use the same timing per question (1 minute) as the actual exam. Answers included. You can purchase, download and start using these papers today.

 

Click on these packs to learn more and buy:

 

11+ Grammar School Exam Mathematics Papers with Answers     11+ Maths Practice Papers for Grammar School, ideal for Kent 11+ Maths Practice

 

Recommendations: English

We offer 3 expertly crafted packs that each contain 4 full-length exam papers. Not only do our papers use the same timing per question (1 minute) as the actual Kent exam but they also cover all of the question types that appear in the real thing: Comprehension, Cloze, Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar. Answers included. Available for download immediately after purchase.

 

Click on these packs to learn more and buy:

 

11+ Grammar Schools English Practice Papers    Kent 11 plus examinations English sample practice papers    11+ GL-style English Exam Papers

 

 

Recommendations: 11+ Kent Practice Tests

There’s no doubt that taking full practice tests is one of the most effective ways of preparing for the Kent 11+ exam. Therefore, not only do we provide the subject specific preparation materials mentioned above, we have also produced three exclusive full-length Kent Mock exams that cover all areas of the test.

 

The key benefits of our 11+ Kent Practice Tests include:

 

  • Specifically produced for the Kent 11+ exam and exclusively available through Exam Papers Plus
  • All subject and topic areas covered: English, Maths and Verbal, Non-Verbal and Spatial Reasoning
  • Replicates the actual examination experience with timed sections designed to match the Kent Test timings
  • Timed and untimed practice sections before each main test designed according to the Kent Test specifications
  • Multiple-choice response sheets included so your child can get accustomed to filling in their answers quickly and accurately
  • Answers included
  • Available for download and printing immediately after purchase. Gain access and start preparing today!

11+ Kent Practice Test 1

11+ Kent Practice Test 2

11+ Kent Practice Test 3

 

 

If you have any questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to get in touch. We are always happy to help and advise!

 

If you want to receive updates on the Kent 11 plus test and alerts on new product releases, subscribe to our mailing list at the bottom of this page.

 

Thanks for reading!

 

The Exam Papers Plus Team

 

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Posted on in 11+

A boy studying with books at home

One of the first steps to preparing for the 11 Plus English exam is knowing what to expect from the test paper. Depending on the exam body that administers the test in your local area, the format of the exam paper can vary.

 

There are two main 11 Plus exam boards and although their exam formats contain some similarities, there are differences that will affect how your child prepares for the 11 Plus English test.

 

Granada Learning (GL) tests usually last around 45 minutes and present questions in multiple choice format, whereas CEM (Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring) tests can contain both standard and multiple-choice formats. CEM tests focus on testing breadth of vocabulary and frequently include Cloze exercises.

 

Additionally, some schools prefer to administer their own 11 Plus English tests and so their exam format can be different from the typical exam board papers.

 

Whichever exam body administers your child’s 11 Plus English exam, the test papers will generally assess at least some of the following elements:

 

  • Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Literacy
  • Comprehension
  • Creative writing

 

For a general overview of the types of questions your child can expect from the exam, take a look at this video from CareerVidz:

 

How to Prepare for the 11 Plus English Exam

 

As with all 11 Plus preparation, it’s best to start early. Create a study timetable with your child in the months leading up to the exam and allocate specific days and times for revision. A study timetable can be as simple as an Excel spreadsheet or a wall planner.

 

Before you allocate specific topics to certain days, it can be really beneficial to know where your child’s strengths and weaknesses lie. This way, you can focus more study time on the areas that they need more help with.

 

One of the best ways of identifying your child’s current abilities is to use 11 Plus practice exam papers. It can be useful to introduce test papers early to gauge your child’s current level and then return to them in the lead up to the exam.

 

The following student testimonial from 11 Plus TV provides a good insight into how students typically prepare for the 11 Plus exam:

 

 

Focus on Improving Core Skills

 

Many of the core skills required for the English exam are covered within the Key Stage 2 Curriculum. If your child has a good grasp of the elements of KS2 English, then they should have a good grounding for the 11+.  Encourage your child to read curriculum texts and to pay particular attention to English classwork and homework. It may be worthwhile revisiting your child’s coursework throughout the year, to further identify any weak areas.

 

When reviewing your child’s homework, be particularly vigilant with spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, grammar and vocabulary. Having a good grasp of the basics of English can really help when it comes to answering standard format questions in the exam.

 

Double Checking Spelling

 

Good spelling in the exam doesn’t go unnoticed, so it’s worthwhile spending some time making sure that your child has any commonly misspelt words covered. Spelling games and tests can make preparation more fun, so be sure to check out our post on revision games.

 

It can also be beneficial for your child to be aware of the various literary techniques and how similar sounding words are spelt. Some concepts that you may want to revise with your child can include:

 

  • Antonyms: words with opposite meanings, e.g. good and bad.
  • Compound words: a combination of words that have a single meaning, e.g. flowerpot.
  • Homonyms: words that sound the same but a different meaning, e.g. allowed and aloud.
  • Word groups: words that can be grouped together under a theme, e.g. sports.
  • Synonyms: words that have similar meanings, e.g. walk and stroll.

 

Using Proper Punctuation

 

It’s important that your child knows how to use punctuation properly, especially for the comprehension and creative writing parts of the exam. Some of the punctuation points that your child should be able to demonstrate include:

 

  • Capitalisation
  • Commas
  • Apostrophes
  • Colons
  • Semi-colons
  • Ellipses (hyphens, brackets, dashes)

 

Try to identify any recurring punctuation mistakes that your child makes in their classwork, or homework, and take the time to work on putting them right.

 

Structuring Sentences

 

It’s important that your child is able to structure sentences properly so that they’re able to clearly express meaning. Make sure that your child knows how to structure the various different types of sentences, for example, simple, complex and compound and can write consistently in the appropriate tense.

 

Vocabulary and Literacy

 

Vocabulary and literacy skills go hand-in-hand. If your child is an enthusiastic reader, chances are that they already have a fairly broad vocabulary. However, if your child tends to shy away from reading texts, then encouraging them to read challenging books will help improve both these skills.

 

Reading can help your child identify and understand the various language devices that are tested in the English paper, such as parts of speech (e.g. nouns, pronouns, adjectives etc.) and figures of speech like similes, metaphors, hyperbole, onomatopoeia etc.

 

For a non-exhaustive 11 Plus reading list, check out our post A Reading List for the 11 Plus English Exam.

 

The 11 Plus English Comprehension Test

Screenshot of Exam Papers Plus' 11 Plus English Comprehension tests

 

Most children will already have experience of doing comprehension exercises in class, where they are presented with a text and asked to answer questions on what they’ve just read. In the Eleven Plus English exam, the comprehension test is likely to be based on a fictional novel (like one of those listed in our reading list), or on a factual piece of text, like a newspaper article.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we have English comprehension packs that can help your child get used to answering questions within a time limit.

 

It’s important that your child reads the whole text first, so that they understand the context of the questions that follow. They can then refer back to the text and look for clues that may indicate where the answer lies. Each question is allocated a certain amount of marks, so your child should know how many points they need to make in order to gain the maximum score.

 

The Creative Writing Essay

Girl studying on a laptop at home

 

Some 11+ English tests include a creative writing paper. In some instances, the creative writing element may only be used for 11 Plus appeals purposes and won’t be scored as part of the overall exam. However, every school is different, so you should double check whether this paper will contribute to their final score.

 

The 11 Plus creative writing test normally asks the student to either write from a personal perspective, persuade, explain, or describe a topic. The topic itself can vary greatly from school to school. Some topic examples could include:

 

  • Somewhere that inspires you.
  • An adventure.
  • A favourite memory.
  • Should pupils have to wear school uniform?
  • The importance of family.

 

The Eleven Plus creative writing paper is normally marked based on how well the essay has been planned, i.e. the composition, as well as the student’s use of vocabulary, grammar, punctuation, etc.

 

Pupils can get ahead of the game by practising their creative writing before the exam. It can help to have three or four ‘stock’ stories already written that your child can draw inspiration from on the day.

 

Using Practice Exam Papers

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that using practice exam papers is one of the most effective methods for preparing for the 11 Plus English exam. Not only do they help your child familiarise themselves with the layout of the exam, but they encourage good time management too.

 

About half way through your child’s study schedule, you should introduce practice papers so they have time to get used to answering questions under timed conditions.

 

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Posted on in 11+

Photo of girls at school celebrating exam results

You may want to consider how you’ll help your child deal with their results – good or bad. Waiting on confirmation of school places can be an anxious time for parents and students. To help you manage the outcome of your child’s 11 Plus allocation, we’ve put together this general advice.

 

Keep Your Child Busy on the Day

 

 

On the day that your child’s 11 Plus results are due, try to keep them busy and distracted from the news arriving. Try to ensure that your child will be in a resourceful state and able to handle the news whatever the outcome.

 

If they appear relaxed and not too anxious, you may want to let them discover the news for themselves by letting them open the letter, or email (depending on how you informed). If, however, they appear too worked up, it may be better for you to open the letter first and then approach the subject with your child in whatever way you think is most appropriate.

 

What to do if Your Child Passes the 11 Plus Test?

Teacher and students smiling in class

 

If you live in an area where the 11 Plus score determines which school your child will attend, and they have been offered their first choice, then be sure to celebrate their achievement and acknowledge the effort that they made.

 

In some cases, after passing the 11 Plus, your child will be invited to their chosen schools to attend an interview. The purpose of these interviews is for the school to learn more about the candidates, their hobbies and interests and their extra-curricular activities. It enables the school to confirm the student’s suitability and to check that they have the facilities to support the student.

 

If your child is successful in the interview and the school is satisfied with the report from their current school, they will then make a conditional offer and you will have the opportunity to secure your child’s place.

 

Normally, once the place has been confirmed, you and your child will be invited to attend an induction day at the allocated school.

 

What to do if Your Child Fails the 11 Plus Exam?

 

If your child doesn’t do as well in the exam as they had hoped, reassure them that it’s okay and that there’s a plan B. As a parent, it’s important that you hide any of your own disappointment and focus on the positives of the situation.

 

Rather than trying to forget about the exam results, take the time to discuss the matter with your child and ask them how they’re feeling. You may also want to talk about how they’ll break the news to their friends and classmates. Remind your child that if they feel upset, you’re there for them to talk to.

 

Once your child feels more resourceful, it’s time to address plan B. Focus on all the positives of attending their allocated school, including the friends they’ll have, the activities they’ll be a part of and other plus points that their first-choice school didn’t have.

 

How to Appeal an 11 Plus Result

Paperwork lying on a desk

 

If you think there are grounds to appeal your child’s 11 Plus exam result, there is sometimes an appeals process that you can follow. It’s worth bearing in mind, however, that most appeals are unsuccessful, so if you do decide to take this route, don’t make any promises to your child.

 

Usually, appeals are only granted when there is evidence that your child will be at harm by not attending their first-choice school, or if the exam body hasn’t followed correct procedures.

 

In any case, you’ll need to gather evidence that supports the reason why your child’s situation should be looked at again. This could include gathering results from mock exams, obtaining evidence of awards and recognitions and obtaining letters from teachers, health professionals etc.

 

For more information on the 11 Plus appeals procedure, take a look at our post How to Appeal a Grammar School Place, or visit some of the 11 Plus forums to learn about other parents’ experiences of appealing.

 

Related post:

5 Ways to Improve Disappointing Mock Exam Results

 

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Posted on in 11+

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One of the most effective ways for your child to prepare for the 11 Plus English exam is to focus on reading. Not only can reading improve your child’s vocabulary, which is equally helpful for the verbal reasoning test, but it can also help them prepare for the comprehension texts in the English paper.

 

Reading can help your child identify and understand the various language devices that are tested in the 11 Plus English paper, such as parts of speech (e.g. nouns, pronouns, adjectives etc.) and figures of speech like similes, metaphors, hyperbole, onomatopoeia etc.

 

You should try to encourage your child to read a broad range of texts, including classic fiction, modern fiction, poems and newspaper articles. The more widely read your child is, the better they’ll become at identifying different writing styles and recognising the different language devices at play.

 

We’ve put together a non-exhaustive 11 Plus reading list that can help your child prepare for the English and verbal reasoning exam. This list should be suitable reading for both boys and girls and includes a mix of classic and modern texts. The following texts do not contain affiliate links.

 

Animal Farm by George Orwell

Animal Farm book by George Orwell

 

 

Animal Farm is a political fable based on the Russian Revolution. Although the text has political undertones, the book reads as a complete story in itself and is therefore a good text to include in an 11 Plus reading list. The book is about a group of farm animals who plot to rebel against the humans who run the farm.

 

Carrie’s War by Nina Bawden

Carries War by Nina Bawden

 

 

Carrie’s War is set during World War II and follows the adventures of two evacuees, Carrie and her younger brother Nick. The book is often read in schools and is studied for its literary merit and accurate historical depictions. The book has also been adapted for television, which could provide students with additional understanding of the text.

 

Charlotte’s Web by E.B White

Charlotte's Web by E.B White

 

Charlotte’s Web is the story of a pig named Wilbur who grows up on a farm and befriends a spider named Charlotte. The story focuses on the unlikely friendship between the two main characters as Wilbur faces being slaughtered by the farmer. The book is hugely popular among school children and a great addition to an 11 Plus reading list.

 

Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian

Goodnight Mr Tom by Michelle Magorian

 

Like Carrie’s War, Goodnight Mister Tom is set during World War II. The book follows the life of a boy, who is evacuated from his London home to live in the country. He befriends an elderly man named Mister Tom, who takes the boy under his wing and provides him with a new experience of life.

 

Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift

Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift

 

Gulliver’s Travels is a classic novel with satirical undertones. The book follows the travels of a man named Gulliver, who visits many fantastical lands. The novel focus on the themes of human nature and travel.

 

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

Lord of the Flies by William Golding

 

Lord of the Flies is a novel set during an unspecific nuclear war, where all adults have disappeared and only children remain. The child characters in the book are marooned on an island where they need to form a community in order to survive. The book follows the well-educated children’s descent into chaos.

 

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

 

Robinson Crusoe is written as an autobiography of the main character, Robinson. The book tells of his adventures while marooned on a tropical island. Robinson is castaway on the island for twenty-seven years and throughout his time there, he encounters cannibals and mutineers. The novel also follows his friendship with a native islander, who Robinson names Man Friday.

 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

 

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer follows the escapades of a young boy who grows up near the Mississippi River, where the author Mark Twain lived. Alongside his friend, Huckleberry Finn, Tom witnesses the murder of Dr. Robinson by Injun Joe, a Native-American. The plot thickens as Injun Joe blames his companion for the murder.

 

The Narnia Series by C.S Lewis

The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S Lewis

 

The Chronicles of Narnia is a classic series of seven fantasy novels set in a fictional world. The novels follow the adventures of a group of children who play various roles through the series as they encounter the fantasy world of mythical beasts, talking animals and magic. The Chronicles of Narnia has also been adapted several times for television and could make a good accompaniment to the books.

 

Warhorse by Michael Morpurgo

Warhorse by Michael Morpurgo

 

War Horse recounts the experiences of a horse named Joey, who is bought by the army for service in World War I in France. The novel follows the attempts of Joey’s previous owner, Albert, who attempts to bring him home safely. The novel has been adapted into an award-winning play and an acclaimed film by Steven Spielberg.

 

Related posts:

7 Plus Reading List for the English Exam

A Reading List for the 8 Plus English Exam

 

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Posted on in 11+, Studying and Revision

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The verbal reasoning part of the 11+ exam can be one of the trickiest to prepare for. The test can vary depending on the examination board. For example, Moray House and Granada Learning (GL) Verbal Reasoning Tests are structured differently to those create by Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM).

 

It’s important that you find out in advance which body will be administering your child’s test, so that you can help them adequately prepare beforehand. The type of verbal reasoning test that your child will sit will of course have an impact on how they prepare.

 

To help your child prepare for the 11 Plus verbal reasoning exam, we’ve put together this guide, to ensure that you have all bases covered. To get us started, let’s first of all, take a look at some examples of verbal reasoning questions and answers in these useful videos from CareerVidz:

 

 

 

Helping Your Child Increase Their Vocabulary

 

Focusing on building your child’s vocabulary not only helps them with the English questions in the exam, but it ensures that they understand each question being asked, whether it be an 11 Plus Maths, or English-focused question.

 

Many parents make the mistake of focusing only on practice exam papers to enhance verbal reasoning skills. Although practice papers are undoubtedly important, starting with the basics can really help give your child an added advantage.

 

A good starting point is to make sure that your child is confident with the Key Stage 2 English course, as the verbal reasoning exam makes use of many of the skills your child will cover throughout the programme.

 

Once your child has a good grasp of the KS2 English requirements, you can help enhance their vocabulary by other means, such as encouraging them to read more challenging books for their age group, giving them spelling tests, playing word games and engaging them in conversations that encourage them to stretch their vocab.

 

Creating word lists can be a particularly useful exercise in getting your child used to seeing unfamiliar words. They can also help your child make better educated guesses on words that they’re unsure about. Using an 11 Plus vocab book, write down any words that your child doesn’t know and add it to their word list. Through time, the list will grow and every week your child will have a new set of words to learn as well as existing words to revise.

 

There are various different types of words that come up in the verbal reasoning test and it can really give your child the edge if they’re somewhat familiar with the type of word that’s being looked at. Typical word types include:

 

  • Antonyms: words with opposite meanings, e.g. good and bad.
  • Compound words: a combination of words that have a single meaning, e.g. flowerpot.
  • Homonyms: words that sound the same but a different meaning, e.g. allowed and aloud.
  • Word groups: words that can be grouped together under a theme, e.g. sports.
  • Synonyms: words that have similar meanings, e.g. walk and stroll.

 

Improving Numeracy and Mental Arithmetic

 

This is the ‘Maths’ or ‘quantitative’ aspect of the verbal reasoning test and is one of the easier parts to prepare for. These types of questions are more common in GL administered tests. Working on improving your child’s numeracy skills and mental arithmetic abilities can really enhance their overall performance in the test.

 

Generally speaking, children usually find the numeracy questions the easiest type of questions in the exam, as they will already have prior experience of them through their Key Stage 2 class work. If your child can master the numeracy and mental arithmetic section of the test, they can spend more time on the more challenging parts of the exam.

 

As always, it’s good to start with the basics, so you may want to ensure that your child knows their times tables. Test them by asking them multiplication questions verbally and having them answer without using a pen and paper or calculator. You should also test them on their division, which pupils then to find trickier than multiplication. Take note of any particular types of sums that your child struggles with and be sure to spend ample time working on them to improve your child’s ability.

 

Focusing on Enhancing Memory

 

If your child can retain information in their head without taking notes, they’ll have a good advantage on the day of the exam. There are lots of ways you can help improve your child’s memory, including asking them to recite their word lists and simply by asking them mental arithmetic questions.

 

There are also various different games that can help enhance their memory and improve their processing speed. For example, take a look at this memory game from Mnemonics:

 

 

Being able to hold data in the short term memory while using it to solve a problem is an essential skills for the 11 Plus verbal reasoning test and it’ll also come in handy for many other aspects of studying and revision. Because speed plays an important part in the test, enhancing your child’s memory will enable them to complete questions quicker and therefore get through more on the day of the test, consequently improving their chances of a good score.

 

11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Practice Exam Papers

Exam Papers Plus verbal reasoning tests

 

Earlier in the post, we said that focusing on verbal reasoning exam papers alone aren’t enough to ensure that your child will do well on the day of the test, and this is true. However, neglecting to use exam papers altogether puts your child at a great disadvantage.

 

Not only to practice papers help familiarise your child with the layout of the verbal reasoning exam, but they help them get used to the types of questions that could be asked. At Exam Papers Plus, we have a range of 11 Plus verbal reasoning exam papers that you can download directly from the site. Each test paper comes complete with answers and explanations, so they can be used over and over again to help your child master their verbal reasoning skills.

 

As the big day approaches, we recommend that your child focuses on doing timed practice papers to improve their time management skills. The quicker they’re able to answer each question, the more questions they’ll be able to answer overall.

 

Related post:

 

11 Plus Non-Verbal Reasoning Advice

Posted on in 11+

Two school girls colouring with crayons

If you’re reading this as a parent with only a few weeks to go until your child’s 11 Plus exam then have no fear. Even in the few remaining weeks, there’s still a lot that can be achieved. We’ve put together this post especially for parents who are having a bit of an 11 Plus emergency.

Keep Stress Levels to a Minimum

 

The first thing to remember when you realise that your child’s exam is just round the corner is not to panic. It’s important that your child doesn’t begin to feel stressed about the situation. By all means, make them aware that they have the exam coming up soon but don’t put any unnecessary pressure on them to cram for the next few weeks.

As with the lead up to any exam, little and often is the key. Work out exactly how many weeks you have until the big day and plan when your child will study.

 

Identify Knowledge Gaps

11 Plus English and Maths practice papers

 

With the exam looming, your child will benefit from a targeted study plan, focusing on any areas that they need to improve in. One of the best ways to identify your child’s knowledge gaps is to practise with sample exam papers. To begin with, we’d suggest that you work through a paper together, so you can see how your child approaches each different type of question. You can then have them sit a practice paper under exam conditions, allocating the correct amount of time for each section.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, all of our practice papers come complete with answers and explanations, so you can compare your child’s answers with the correct ones. We have a range of 11 Plus exam papers, covering English, Maths, Verbal Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning.

 

Create a Study Plan – It’s Never Too Late

 

It can be tempting to go in all guns blazing with your child’s 11 Plus preparation, especially at this stage, but in all cases, a structured study plan is still the best route to go down. A study timetable can be something as simple as an excel spreadsheet or a wall planner that details when your child will study and what.

 

As you count down the days to the exam and tick of those that have passed, your child should become more confident, knowing that their knowledge is improving all the time.

 

Focus on Core Skills

School boy doing homework at the kitchen table

 

Practice exam papers are a very important part of your child’s preparation but there are other techniques you can employ too. Testing your child by asking them mental arithmetic questions and adding and subtracting using shapes will help keep their mind sharp. Similarly, reading with your child and asking them to spell words out loud can help build their vocabulary.

 

Consider Hiring a Tutor

 

It isn’t always easy finding the time to study with your child, especially if there’s a lot of material to cover in a short space of time. If you find yourself struggling to keep up with the demands of your child’s study plan, you could consider hiring an 11 Plus tutor to help out.

 

A couple of hours per week could be all it takes to boost your child’s confidence and fill in any knowledge gaps. For more advice on private tutors, check out our post How to Choose an 11 Plus Tutor for Your Child.

 

By following this last minute 11 Plus preparation advice, your child should be well equipped to do well in the exam. Remember, coaching for the test isn’t always necessary, so the fact that your child has had some preparation (no matter how little) will give them an advantage on the day.

 

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Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

Father and daughter in school

Choosing a grammar school for your child is a big decision – after all, they’ll be spending 5+ years there and there are 164 of them in total in England. Unfortunately, deciding on a grammar school isn’t as simple as making an application.

 

When we consider that your child’s 11 Plus exam results will be a determining factor in their options, the decision becomes ever-more important. In this post, we will guide you through the process of choosing a grammar school with your child.

 

Research Schools in Your Local Area

 

The first thing to do when exploring your child’s grammar school options, is to find out what schools are in your area. This includes state comprehensive schools as well, as it’s important that you know what the grammar school alternatives are.

 

Ask friends and neighbours who have older children where they went to school and ask their opinions on the level of education they received, including the quality of teaching etc. Knowing what schools other children in your area attend gives you a good grounding on which to base your own decision.

 

If you live in one of the larger grammar school areas, you’ll likely be able to choose from a few different schools. However, if you live outside  a grammar school area, your choice may be significantly limited, and boarding may be an option to consider.

 

It’s important that you factor in the logistics of your child attending a school in a different local authority as travel time, expenses etc. can quickly become ‘issues’ if not accounted for beforehand.

 

If you live in London, you might find our post Grammar Schools in London a useful resource.

 

Consider Whether Your Child Would Qualify for a Bursary

School pupil playing the violin

 

Many parents don’t consider the option of applying to fee-paying independent schools but there are those that offer bursary and scholarship programmes. Furthermore, if your child shows exceptional ability in a subject like art, drama, sport or music, then fee-paying schools could also be an avenue to explore. Some schools have scholarships for extra-curricular activities.

 

Read Reviews of Each School

 

Once you’ve drawn up a long-list of potential schools, the next stage is to create a short-list. One of the criteria on your short-list should be quality. The best way to determine how good a school might be, is to read reviews from current and former pupils, parents and teaching staff.

 

A good place to start is the school’s own website. How do they describe themselves? What activities and facilities do they offer? Have they won any awards in any particular areas? How the school sees itself is an important consideration.

 

For non-biased reviews of your grammar school short-list, look for independent websites like The Good Schools Guide and School Guide. Normally the schools reviewed on these sites have been visited in person by someone from the website and so the reviews are usually a first-hand account.

 

You should also read the OFSTED reports for each school for a deeper insight into the school’s performance. It’s easy to make assumptions about a school on the surface, but once you look at their statistics, you’ll get a far clearer overview of what the school is like.

 

Secondary school league tables are also an important consideration, especially if your child has the choice of several schools. A school’s position in the league tables is often a reflection of the quality of teaching at the school. Likewise, if your child has special needs, check the school’s SEN policies.

 

Another good source of information on grammar schools is 11 Plus forums where parents just like you are asking the same questions. For a list of useful forums, check out our post Our List of the Best 11 Plus Forums.

 

Check the Admissions Policies of Each School

Paperwork filed in shelves

 

Most schools admit pupils on the basis of their 11 Plus exam results. However, there are often other conditions attached to entry, such as the outcome of a face-to-face interview and the results of a school report from the pupil’s current school.

 

It’s important that you’re aware of each school’s admission policy to determine whether your child has a chance of being accepted. We’d also advise that you contact the school’s admissions secretary for more information on their entry process.

 

Arrange a Visit to Your Short-Listed Schools

 

It’s one thing to read reviews from other people online, but quite another to visit the school in person. Most schools offer guided tours to parents and pupils who are interested in applying for a place. These visits give you the opportunity to see the school grounds, meet current pupils, teaching staff and very often, the headteacher. Grammar schools also host regular open days, where all parents and prospective students are invited to visit and meet teaching staff.

 

Visiting a grammar school in person gives you an insight into what a typical school day is like and helps you get a feel for the place.

 

Discuss the Options with Your Child

Headshot of a school girl

 

At first, you child may not have any strong feelings about one school over the other, but the more you discuss their options, the more you’ll be able to judge what school might be the best fit for them. Some things that you may want to consider with your child include:

 

  • The facilities and activities on offer
  • The location of the school grounds
  • Your child’s first impressions of the school
  • The distance to the school from home
  • How your child found the teaching staff and pupils
  • Your child’s academic strengths and weaknesses
  • You child’s sociability

 

When discussing the options with your child, try to determine the reasons why they prefer one school over another. Try as much as possible, to keep your opinions to yourself initially, so as not to influence them one way or another. Sometimes, disagreeing with your child too early can make them all the more determined to stick to their decision. Once your child has had a few days to mull over their options, ask them again what their thoughts are and then ask them if you can share your opinions.

 

Rank Your Preferred Schools in Order

 

Once you’ve discussed all the options, the final stage is to rank your child’s preferred schools in order. Whether you have a list of 8 schools, or a list of 2, it’s important that you have a backup in case your child doesn’t get their first choice. Try to set your child’s expectations in getting a place at their preferred school and try not to put too much pressure on them to perform well in the 11 Plus exams.

 

Related post:

Top Grammar Schools in the UK

 

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Posted on in 11+

Student being tutored in class

Choosing a suitable 11 Plus tutor for your child can take some research. Tutoring for the eleven plus is in high demand, and many tutors are booked up months, sometimes years in advance. To help guide you through the maze of choosing an 11 Plus tutor, we’ve put together this post that will give you a good overview of what you should look for.

 

Ask About Their Qualifications

 

 

Before you hire a tutor, it’s important that you find out as much background information about them as you can. In the UK, there no recognised tutoring qualification, so essentially, anyone can call themselves a tutor.

 

In most cases, a good private tutor will be educated to at least degree level and have some experience of working with young people. You’ll often find qualified teachers offering tutoring services to supplement their teaching income and supply, or retired teachers often do the same.

 

How qualified a tutor needs to be to teach the 11 Plus is really up to you as a parent.

 

Check Their References

Texting on a mobile phone

 

A good tutor will be able to provide you with references from previous students and parents. It’s important that you make the effort to contact these references to ensure that they were happy with the service that they received.

 

In addition to checking references, you should also enquire about whether the tutor has a DBS certificate. DBS stands for Disclosure and Barring Service, an organisation that carries out background checks on people who work with children and vulnerable groups. You should ensure that your child’s tutor carries up to date certification.

 

How do They Approach Lessons?

 

 

One thing you’ll want to know when choosing an 11 Plus tutor is whether they know their stuff. Make sure you ask them how they approach lessons and give them the opportunity to demonstrate their 11 Plus knowledge.

 

Normally, tutoring sessions last for 60 to 90 minutes and the tutor will follow a schedule to ensure that every aspect of the 11 Plus exam is covered. In addition to working on the material, a good tutor will also have access to eleven plus practice exam papers.

 

Where Will Lessons Take Place?

School girl sitting at a desk

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we specialise in tutoring for the 11 Plus. All of our tutors are appropriately qualified and offer a first-rate service. For more information on our service take a look at our 11 Plus tutoring page.

 

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Posted on in 11+, Studying and Revision

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Revising for the 11 Plus takes planning and focus. With a revision timetable in place, your child will significantly increase their chances of passing the eleven plus exam. But knowing what material to focus and exactly how to approach revision can be tricky. To help guide your child in their revision, we’ve put together this post, which specifically covers 11 Plus revision techniques.

Knowing How Long to Revise For

 

Assuming that your child still has several months before they’re due to take the 11 Plus test, revision should be spaced out throughout the week. The average 10 or 11 year old can only concentrate at full capacity for around half an hour, so revision session shouldn’t be any longer.

 

A half hour of revision every other night several months before the exam, should be plenty of time to improve your child’s chances of success. As the exam draws nearer, you can increase the amount of time spent on revising by working through practice exam papers, which we’ll cover later in the post.

 

Improving 11 Plus Maths Core Skills

Boy studying at home

 

As part of the exam, your child will be required to answer a series of Maths-based questions. One of the best ways to improve your child’s maths skills is to ensure that they can tackle any question within the Key Stage 2 Curriculum. Having a good grasp of numeracy and problem solving should help see them through most types of Maths questions that could come up on the day. For more information on how to improve your child’s Maths skills, take a look at our post An 11 Plus Guide to Maths.

 

Focus on 11 Plus English Core Skills

 

One of the most effective ways to improve your child’s 11 Plus English skills is to focus on literacy. By encouraging your child to read curriculum texts and pay particular attention to English classwork and homework, their literacy skills will be improving all the time.

 

When looking over your child’s classwork, be particularly vigilant with spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, grammar and vocabulary. Having a good grasp of the basics will help you child when it comes to answering standard format questions in the exam.

 

Develop 11 Plus Non-Verbal Reasoning Skills

A girl reading flash cards

Non-verbal reasoning is arguably one of the most challenging 11 Plus techniques to develop. Although your child will have some experience of non-verbal reasoning through the Maths curriculum, most children will need extra revision time to focus on improving these skills.

 

Non-verbal reasoning focuses on shapes and spatial awareness. A good way to revise for the non-verbal reasoning test is to study mirror images and work on addition and subtraction techniques using objects. For more information on how to prepare for this part of the exam, take a look at our post 11 Plus Non-Verbal Reasoning Advice.

 

Improve 11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Skills

 

The verbal reasoning exam focuses strongly on vocabulary-based exercises. Like the English exam, you can help your child improve their verbal reasoning skills by working on paired reading, spelling and vocabulary building. Focusing on parts of speech, odd ones out, moving letters and missing words can really help improve your child’s success.

 

Using Exam Practice Papers

11 Plus English and Maths practice papers

 

Around three months before the exam approaches, you should start to shift the focus away from the material and towards exam technique. One of the best 11 Plus revision techniques out there is to work through practice exam papers.

 

At first, work through practice papers with your child to make sure that they fully understand the question and they know the type of answer that’s required. Once they’re familiar with the layout of the exam, have them sit a few practice papers on their own, under exam conditions. This is a great way to identify their strengths and weaknesses and improve their time management skills.

Related post:

Everything You Need to Know About the 8 Plus Exam

 

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Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

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There are many benefits to passing the 11 Plus exam, least of all having the opportunity to apply to your child’s first choice grammar school. However, there’s more to passing the exam than simply knowing the material. And sometimes it’s the extra effort that makes the real difference. In this post, we provide our overview of how to pass the 11 Plus exam.

 

Find Out What Exam Board Will Administer the Test

 

There are two 11 Plus exam boards that administer the test – the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM) and Granada Learning (GL). Where you live will determine which test your child will sit. Although the exam format for each test is similar, there are differences that will affect what material your child will need to study.

Start Preparing for the 11 Plus Early

School pupil working in class

 

In most cases, children need at least some preparation if they’re to pass the 11 Plus exam and in most cases, they need a regular study schedule months in advance. Having a study plan in place well before the day of the exam will give your child plenty of time to practise and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

 

However, it’s important not to overload your child with too much study. It’s always best to space out learning into small chunks, over a long period of time, so that your child doesn’t become overwhelmed. At 10 or 11 years old, a child can concentrate for around half an hour before becoming weary. If you have a structured study plan in place, half an hour every other night should be all your child needs to do well in the exam.

 

Cover Each Element of the Exam

 

Regardless of which exam board administers your child’s test, they will still be tested on the same subjects, namely English, Maths, Verbal and Non-Verbal Reasoning. It’s important that your child’s study schedule covers all possible topics.

 

For the English part of the exam, your child will be tested on all, or a combination of the following topics:

 

  • Spelling
  • Punctuation
  • Comprehension
  • Sentence structure
  • Grammar
  • Vocabulary
  • Literacy

 

You should therefore aim to work on these topics with your child through writing exercises and reading.

 

In the non-verbal reasoning section, your child will be tested on shapes and spatial awareness. Studying mirror images, working on addition and subtraction using objects and Maths games are all good ways to help your child prepare for non-verbal reasoning questions.

 

For an insight into the types of questions that are asked in the non-verbal reasoning section, take a look at this video from CareerVids:

 

 

For the verbal reasoning part of the exam, there are many different types of question that your child could be asked. Generally speaking, focusing on building vocabulary and using practice papers can help your child improve their verbal reasoning skills. CareerVids also has a useful video on verbal reasoning questions:

 

 

For the Maths section of the exam, your child should have a good basic understanding of numeracy and Maths concepts as well as any material covered in the Key Stage 2 Maths curriculum.

 

Practise Both Question Formats

 

In the 11 Plus exam, there are two question formats – multiple choice and standard. Multiple choice involves selecting the correct answer from several options and the standard format requires a written response.

 

Make sure your child practises both question formats if they are both tested by the schools you are applying to.  Parents often believe that the best way to prepare for the exam is to focus only on the standard format questions with the assumption that the multiple choice is easy. However, both formats require a different set of skills and so should be practised equally.

 

Use 11 Plus Practice Papers

11 Plus English and Maths practice papers

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that using practice exam papers is one of the most effective methods to pass the 11 Plus. Of course, no one approach is the best way to prepare, but practice papers are good at putting theory into practice.

 

Not only do they help your child familiarise themselves with the layout of the exam, but they encourage good time management too. About half way through your study schedule, you should introduce 11 Plus practice papers into your child’s routine so they have time to get used to answering questions under timed conditions.

 

Practice papers also give a good overview of where your child’s strengths and weaknesses lie. If there are areas that your child needs to improve in, you can adjust their study schedule to focus on their weaker areas in the lead up to the exam.

 

Get Support From Other Parents

 

Sometimes, the best advice comes from those who have already experienced preparing their child for the 11 Plus. Although other parents aren’t always the most forthcoming in sharing information about the exam face-to-face, there’s lots of good information out there on 11 Plus forums. Online communities are particularly good for local information on the 11 Plus, like what exam board administers the test, what the pass mark is, how many school places are available etc.

 

To save you time trawling the internet for these communities, we’ve put together a list of the best 11 Plus forums on the internet.

 

Consider Using a Private Tutor

11 Plus tutor helping a child with classwork

 

If you find that your child is struggling with their 11 Plus preparation, you might want to try a private tutor. One of the main benefits of tutoring is that your child will have the undivided attention of someone who really knows what they’re talking about for at least an hour.

 

However, eleven plus tutors can be hard to come by, so you should start your search for one early as many are booked up months in advance.  If you live in London, then you’re in luck because, at Exam Papers Plus, we specialise in preparing pupils for the 11 Plus exam. We provide tuition by the hour as well as offering intensive and residential courses.

 

Although following this advice on how to pass the 11 Plus isn’t a guarantee of success, it will help you prepare your child as fully as possible.

 

Related post:

11 Plus Revision Guide

 

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Posted on in 11+

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For many children, the eleven plus exam will be their first experience of studying for an important test. Unlike revising for class tests, the 11 Plus requires focus and most importantly, a plan. As a parent, you can help your child study for the test by ensuring that you have everything covered from the list of study tips below.

Create a Study Plan

 

As they saying goes, failure to prepare means preparing to fail. Having a study plan in place well before the day of the exam is crucial if your child is to cover all the topics they’ll need to know about. A study plan can be as simple as a spreadsheet, a diary or a wall planner. It should outline what should be studied, when and for how long.

 

For more information on what subjects to focus on, take a look at our post An 11 Plus Guide for Parents.

 

Be Realistic with the Workload

 

Even the best-intentioned student can’t maintain a study schedule that offers no time off. At primary level, pupils can only concentrate effectively for half an hour at a time. And when you consider that a lot of their studying will be done after school, it makes sense to approach studying in small doses.

 

Practice Standard Format and Multiple Choice Questions

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It’s important that your child studies for multiple choice and standard format questions

 

One of our most effective 11 Plus study tips is to practice both styles of question. Although some eleven plus tests use multiple choice questions, others can use a standard format or a combination of both. We sometimes see parents making the mistake of encouraging their child to study for standard format questions only in the hope that their child will find the multiple choice questions easy. However, this isn’t always the case. Multiple choice questions present their own unique challenge.

 

Make Studying Fun

 

Sometimes, we learn best when we don’t realise we’re actually learning. Try to encourage your child to be aware of the topics they’re studying by placing reminders around the house. Post-it notes with buzz words and flash cards with formulas can be placed anywhere as a way to help your child remember important pieces of information.

 

For more information on how to make studying fun, check out two of our most popular posts – Top Revision Games for Primary School Kids and Favourite Homework Games.

 

Study in a Different Location

 

Studying in the same room night after night can become tiresome, especially if you’re 10 years old. Try to vary the places that your child studies to give them extra motivation when their efforts start to lag. You can try using different rooms in the house, or taking them to the library, or café for a change of scene.

 

Use Practice Papers

11 Plus English and Maths practice papers

At Exam Papers Plus, we specialise in 11 Plus practice papers

 

Exam practice papers are one of the most effective ways to study for the 11 Plus and one of our top study tips. Not only do they put your child’s knowledge and understanding to the test, but they familiarise them with the layout of the exam. In the months approaching the test, arrange for your child to do timed papers, to see how they cope with the allocated time that they’re given.

 

Do Exam Papers Under Test Conditions

 

This is another one of our favourite 11 Plus study tips. Doing practice papers under exam conditions helps your child gauge how long they have to spend on each question. If they run out of time, then you know that they need to work on their time management. If they finish too early, then perhaps they haven’t answered the questions in full.

 

Allocate Time to Weaker Areas

 

After completing a few practice papers, you’ll have a good idea of where your child’s strengths and weaknesses lie. If there are any areas that your child needs to improve in, be sure to allocate more time in their study schedule to focus on these elements.

 

Reward Your Child When They Do Well

 

Another great study tip for the 11 Plus is to reward your child when they reach certain milestones. Because 11 Plus study normally begins months before the exam, it’s a good idea to break things down into small achievable goals. Once your child completes a goal, reward them with a treat of some kind. It could be a day trip, a present, or a special lunch to name a few examples.

 

Take Time Out From Studying

 

It may seem counter-productive to stop studying in the run up to an exam, but taking a few days off can help your child recharge their batteries. They key thing to remember is not to overload your child with too much information too soon. Sometimes a few days away from studying can do the world of good for your child’s memory.

 

For more 11 Plus study tips, take a look at this useful video from Edform:

 

 

By following our 11 Plus study tips, you’ll increase the likelihood of your child doing well in the exam. Remember that little and often is the key when it comes to preparing for the test and a good night’s sleep beforehand will ensure that they’re alert on the morning of the test.

 

Related post:

11 Plus Mock Exams Advice

What You Need to Know About the 8 Plus Exam

The 10 Plus Exam: Everything You Need to Know

The 11 Plus Verbal Reasoning Test

 

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Posted on in 11+, Grammar Schools

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Ever since the introduction of modern grammar schools in 1944, they have been associated with academic success. Their selective process by means of the 11 Plus exam makes grammar entry very competitive.

 

There are currently 164 grammar schools in England and 69 in Northern Ireland and when compared to the number of state secondaries (around 3,000) it’s easy to see why they’re so sought after by parents.

 

In this post, we take a closer look at the benefits of attending a grammar school.

 

What Are Grammar Schools?

 

Grammars are state secondary schools that admit pupils based on their academic performance in the 11 Plus exam. Under the grammar school system, students who are successful in passing the exam gain entry to their local grammar and those who are unsuccessful attend their local secondary modern.

 

The alternative to the grammar school system and the most commonly used in the UK is the comprehensive system, where students of all abilities learn together.

 

Although there are some grammars in Wales and Scotland, they are only identified as such by name. They do not operate under the grammar school system, and are non-selective.

 

Opportunities for the Most Capable Students

A group of school girls chatting

Grammar schools undermine privilege

 

It’s often said that grammar schools undermine privilege and enable the brightest students to study at top schools, regardless of their social background. Because entry to grammar school is based on academic performance in the 11 Plus, pupils who score highly won’t be denied a place for any external reasons.

 

A commonly held belief about grammars is that they provide opportunities for students from poorer backgrounds to climb the social ladder.

 

Consistently Strong Exam Results

 

Because grammar pupils are generally of the same ability, it’s argued that teachers are able to progress lessons more effectively than at comprehensive level. As such, grammar schools tend to be the highest performing schools in local and national league tables.

 

According to a 2008 report conducted by the Sutton Trust and published on the Grammar Schools Association website, grammar school students perform better in GCSEs than pupils from other schools. There are also indications that grammar pupils make greater progress at KS3 and KS4 level.

 

Successful Students

School girl chatting with friends

Many high acheivers attended grammar schools

 

Another advantage of grammar schools is their track record of producing students who go on to have successful careers in a variety of industries. Former grammar school pupils who are now high achievers include John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Boris Johnson, Margaret Thatcher, David Attenborough and Anthony Hopkins.

 

It’s often said that attending a grammar school provides pupils with the skills, resources and connections required to be successful later in life.

 

Improved Social Mobility

 

Gaining entry to a top grammar school means having access to a comprehensive education and a network of influential friends. Evidence suggests that the friendships students forge at school have an impact on their future success.

 

Likewise, a recent study conducted by a group of universities, including the University of Bath, Bristol, and the Institute of Education at the University of London concluded that pupils who attend a grammar school end up earning more than those who attend comprehensive schools.

 

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Posted on in 11+

When preparing your child for the 11 Plus exam, the first thing you need to know is what exam board will administer the test. There are two main 11 Plus exam boards and although their exam formats are similar, there are differences that will affect how your child prepares for the test.

 

In this post, we look at each exam board in more detail and explore the Differences Between CEM and GL tests.

 

The 11 Plus GL Exam Board

Aerial photo of a school examination

The GL Assessment replaced the NFER exam board in 2001

 

GL stands for Granada Learning, the body that administers the test for most 11 Plus exams. Previously known as the National Education Foundation for Education Research (NFER), the exam board was bought by Granada Learning in 2001. NFER still exists as a research company today.

 

Subjects Covered

 

As of 2016, the GL exam board can cover up to five subjects at 11 Plus level: English, Maths, Spatial reasoning, Verbal Reasoning and Non-Verbal Reasoning. Grammar schools can choose which combination of these subjects will be tested for entry.

 

The Exam Format

 

Most GL exams last around 45 minutes and questions are normally in multiple choice format though some authorities use a written answer format for verbal and maths tests. Questions are drawn from a large question bank but there are a set number of question types and styles.

 

The 11 Plus CEM Exam Board

A school table and chair in an exam hall

The CEM exam was introduced as a response to coaching for the 11 Plus

 

The CEM exam was created by the University of Durham’s Centre for Evaluation & Monitoring. The test was introduced in 1999 in response to concerns over coaching for the GL Assessment. The new exam board was developed with the aim of reducing the transparency of 11 Plus questions and creating a fairer assessment. The CEM website states:

 

‘Children can best prepare for our 11+ selection assessments by learning to work quietly on their own, completing homework set by their school, and by reading and trying to understand all the words in any books they read.’

 

Subjects Covered

 

The CEM test covers numerical reasoning, verbal and non-verbal reasoning. They claim that the types of questions asked in the exam have more in common with the National Curriculum at KS2 level. The CEM definition of verbal reasoning is broader than that of GL and incorporates things like Comprehension.

 

The Exam Format

 

CEM tests could incorporate standard or multiple-choice formats, or both. There are usually two test papers consisting of shorter timed sections that integrate the different subjects in a mixed order.

The exact weighting of subjects isn’t known beforehand but there is a strong emphasis on vocabulary, problem solving and speed.

 

11 Plus Exam Board Regions

 

Whether a pupil will sit the GL Assessment or the CEM depends on the region of the grammar school. As of 2016, the following regions use the GL Assessment:

 

  • Dorset
  • Kent
  • Lancashire & Cumbria
  • Lincolnshire
  • Medway
  • Northern Ireland
  • Wiltshire

 

And the following regions use the CEM:

 

  • Berkshire
  • Bexley
  • Birmingham
  • Buckinghamshire
  • Devon
  • Gloucestershire
  • Shropshire
  • Walsall
  • Warwickshire
  • Wirral
  • Wolverhampton

 

And these regions use a combination of the GL Assessment and the CEM:

 

  • Devon
  • Essex
  • Hertfordshire
  • Trafford
  • Yorkshire

 

Currently, grammar schools in Surrey write their own test papers, using the Selective Eligibility Test (SET).

 

As a side note, you may also be interested in our List of 11 Plus Grammar Schools in London and our 13 Plus Late Transfer Exam Guide.

 

We hope this post helps explain the difference between the GL and CEM 11 Plus exam boards. If you found this article useful, please share it on social media using the buttons below:

 

You might also want to check out our post on helping your child revise and how to pass the 11 Plus exam.

 

We produce specialist practice papers that will help your child prepare for both the CEM and GL exams. You can see our full 11+ range here.

 

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Posted on in 11+

Interview room door with classroom table in background

After passing the 11 Plus exam, your child may be asked to attend an interview at their independent school of choice. Securing an independent school interview doesn’t guarantee entry and so you’ll need to take the time to help your child prepare. In this post, we look at some ways you can help your child do well in the interview as well as the most common independent school interview questions.

 

The Purpose of the 11 Plus Interview

 

Before practising for the interview, it’s important to understand why your child is being interviewed and what the school is looking for from your child. Of course, every independent school is different, but the principal reasons for interview are the same.

 

First of all, the school wants to asses if your child is a suitable match for them. They want to know that your child will fit in academically and socially and displays the types of behaviours that the school expects from its pupils.

 

They also want to know that your child is committed to studying and participating in extra-curricular activities. Similarly, the school needs to know that it’s able to provide your child with the education they need and provide them with support throughout their school career.

 

Independent School Interview Tips

Girl studying for an exam in school

 

These are our general interview tips for independent schools. We would advise that parents and children research the school before the big day, so that you both have a good background knowledge of the school, including its achievements, subjects, activities and facilities.

 

Get a Good Night’s Sleep

 

This one goes without saying, but it’s important that your child is fresh and alert on the morning of their interview. It can help to keep your child calm the night before so that they feel relaxed and prepared the following day.

 

Don’t Worry About Nerves

 

Every adult knows about nerves before an interview, but what really helps is knowing that you’re prepared for every eventuality. Explain to your child that being a little nervous is actually a good thing as it shows that you care about the outcome and are getting prepared.

 

Dress Appropriately

 

It’s important that you and your child make a good first impression at the interview, so dress for the occasion. Try to strike a balance between formal and smart with your child’s without going over the top.

 

Arrive in Plenty of Time

 

Turning up seconds before the interview (or worse, late) and being flustered is far from ideal. Make sure that travel arrangements are already in place and that you’ve accounted for potential delays in traffic or public transport.

 

Remove All Distractions Beforehand

 

Before you enter the interview room with your child, make sure that you and your child’s mobile phone are switched off. It’s also a good idea to make sure that watches don’t beep and all other electronic equipment is left at home.

 

Encourage Your Child to be Honest

 

There’s no point in asking your child to pretend. Children find it far easier to tell the truth about their education and interests than to fabricate stories. Explain to your child that it’s okay to say that they don’t know, or that they don’t understand the question. The interviewer will be aware that your child won’t have any prior experience in independent school interviews.

 

Independent School Interview Questions

Notepad and textbook on table

 

As we mentioned before, every school will ask different questions. However, there are similarities in the types of questions that will be asked. We’ve highlighted some of the most common 11 Plus interview questions below.

 

Why are you interested in our school?

 

Here, the interview wants to know that firstly, your child knows a bit about the school, and secondly, that they’ll be a good fit. A good answer might include a little bit about the school’s history or achievements and a few personal reasons that relate to studying or future career aspirations.

 

Tell me about your current school…

 

This question gives your child the opportunity to talk positively about their time at school and their achievements.

 

Tell me about a current event that interests you…

 

Schools ask this question to gauge your child’s awareness of world events. Although they’re not expected to talk about current issues in great depth, it helps to have an example prepared beforehand.

 

What do you like to read outside of school?

 

This question provides the school with a good indication of how keen your child is to study outside of school and what reading level they are at.

 

What hobbies or interests do you have outside of school?

 

This question provides the opportunity to talk about the types of extra-curricular activities the school has to offer. The interviewer wants to know that your child is a good match academically and socially.

 

In short, it’s important to research the school before your child’s 11 Plus interview. Try to have a discussion with your child prior to interview so they have a framework in which to think about certain common questions. Let your child know that if they’re asked a question that they don’t know the answer to, they should keep calm and remember that questions can often be open ended with no specific right or wrong answer.

 

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Posted on in 11+

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Navigating your way through the 11 Plus for the first time as a parent can be a challenge.  How do you help your child prepare? What’s the exam format? Where can you buy exam papers? In this post, we’ve written an 11 Plus guide for parents that aims to answer all your questions.

 

What is the 11 Plus?

 

The 11 Plus is an exam used be some areas in the UK to select pupils for top grammar schools. Given that the test aims to find the most academic students, not every child passes the exam. For those that do however, attending a grammar school can be very rewarding. The Eleven Plus is normally taken by pupils in Year 6 when they are 10 or 11 years old, hence the name of the exam.

 

A History of the Eleven Plus

Black and white photograph of a classroom

The 11+ system was used nationwide until 1976 but is still used in many counties today

 

The exam was introduced to the UK in 1944 by the Butler Education Act as a way of testing for grammar school entry. Students who were successful in passing the exam would be placed at a Grammar School and those who were unsuccessful attended at Secondary Modern School or a Technical School.