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GCSE Physics Syllabus

The GCSE physics syllabus consists of eight subject areas, spread out over two test papers:

 

  1. Energy
  2. Electricity
  3. Particle model of matter
  4. Atomic structure
  5. Forces
  6. Waves
  7. Magnetism and electromagnetism
  8. Space physics

 

In the first paper, you’ll be asked questions on subjects 1-4, i.e. energy; electricity; particle model of matter and atomic structure. The second paper covers subjects 4-8: forces; waves; magnetism and electromagnetism and space physics.

 

Before starting your exam preparation, we recommend that you familiarise yourself with the GCSE physics syllabus. In this article, we take a look at each of the subject areas in a little more detail.

 

  1. Energy 

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Changes in energy stores
  • Energy and heating
  • Energy demands
  • Work, power and efficiency

 

Students must understand energy changes in a system, and the ways energy is stored before and after such changes. You should be able to calculate the amount of energy associated with a moving object, a stretched spring and an object raised above ground level.

 

Next, you should become familiar with the concept of power: the rate at which energy is transferred. The more powerful a device is, the more energy it will transfer per second. Students must know the equation of power:

 

Power = Work / time

 

You should be able to give examples that illustrate the definition of power.

 

For energy demands and efficiency, students must understand that all humans transfer energy and be able to recall and apply relevant equations.

 

  1. Electricity 

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Electric circuits
  • Mains electricity
  • Static electricity

The GCSE physics syllabus states that for electric circuits, students should be able to draw and interpret circuit diagrams, including switch, lamp, fixed resistor and variable resistor.

 

For mains electricity, you should be able to explain that a live wire may be dangerous even when a switch in the mains circuit is open and also the dangers of providing any connection between the live wire and earth.

 

For static electricity, you should be able to:

 

  • Describe the production of static electricity, and sparking, by rubbing surfaces
  • Describe evidence that charged objects exert forces of attraction or repulsion on one another when not in contact
  • Explain how the transfer of electrons between objects can explain the phenomena of static electricity

 

  1. Particle model of matter  

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Density of materials
  • Particles in gases
  • Temperature changes and energy

 

The particle model of matter is widely used to predict the behaviour of solids, liquids and gases. For this subject, the GCSE physics syllabus states that students should be able to:

 

  • Recognise/draw simple diagrams to model the difference between solids, liquids and gases
  • Explain the differences in density between the different states of matter in terms of the arrangement of atoms or molecules
  • Describe how, when substances change state (melt, freeze, boil, evaporate, condense or sublimate), mass is conserved
  • Interpret heating and cooling graphs that include changes of state
  • Distinguish between specific heat capacity and specific latent heat
  • Explain how the motion of the molecules in a gas is related to both its temperature and its pressure
  • Explain qualitatively the relation between the temperature of a gas and its pressure at constant volume
  • Calculate the change in the pressure of a gas or the volume of a gas when either the pressure or volume is increased or decreased

 

  1. Atomic structure 

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Atoms, isotopes and ions
  • Models of the atom
  • Nuclear fission and fusion
  • Radioactive decay
  • Uses and dangers of radiation

 

For this topic, the GCSE physics syllabus states that students should be able to:

 

  • Understand the structure of isotopes and ions
  • Describe why the new evidence from the scattering experiment led to a
  • change in the atomic model
  • Describe the difference between the plum pudding model of the atom
  • and the nuclear model of the atom
  • Use the names and symbols of common nuclei and particles
  • Explain the concept of half-life and how it is related to the random nature of radioactive decay
  • Compare hazards associated with contamination and radiation
  • Draw/interpret diagrams representing nuclear fission and how a chain reaction may occur

 

  1. Forces 

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Scalar and vector quantities
  • Contact and non-contact forces
  • Gravity
  • Forces and elasticity
  • Moments, levers and gears
  • Pressure in fluids
  • Describing motion
  • Forces, acceleration and Newton’s Laws
  • Momentum

 

The laws of gravity, elasticity, level and gears, describing motion and the pressure in fluids are all topics covered in the GCSE physics syllabus under ‘Forces’. According to the syllabus specification, you must be able to:

 

  • Recall typical values of speed for a person walking, running and cycling as well as the typical values of speed for different types of transportation systems
  • Make measurements of distance and time and then calculate speeds of objects
  • Calculate average speed for non-uniform motion
  • Explain the vector–scalar distinction as it applies to displacement, distance, velocity and speed
  • Draw distance–time graphs from measurements
  • Apply Newton’s three laws, with examples where appropriate
  • Estimate stopping distances and reaction times
  • Explain the dangers caused by large decelerations
  • Describe and explain examples of momentum in an event, such as a collision

 

  1. Waves

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Properties of waves
  • Transverse and longitudinal waves
  • Reflection and refraction
  • Sound and ultrasound (Higher Tier only)
  • Lenses
  • Black body radiation

 

According to the GCSE physics syllabus on the subject of ‘Waves’, students should be able to:

 

  • Describe the difference between longitudinal and transverse waves
  • Describe evidence that, for both ripples on the water surface and sound waves in air, it is the wave and not the water or air itself that travels
  • Describe wave motion
  • Show how changes in velocity, frequency and wavelength are interrelated
  • Construct ray diagrams to illustrate the reflection of a wave at a surface
  • Describe the effects of reflection, transmission and absorption of waves at material interfaces
  • Give examples that illustrate the transfer of energy by electromagnetic waves
  • Construct ray diagrams to illustrate the refraction of a wave
  • Use information, or draw/ interpret diagrams to show how radiation affects the temperature of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere

 

  1. Magnetism and electromagnetism

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • Electromagnetic induction
  • Electromagnets
  • Magnetic fields
  • Transformers

 

For this topic, the GCSE physics syllabus states that students should be able to:

 

  • Describe the attraction and repulsion between unlike and like poles for permanent magnets and explain the difference between permanent and induced magnets
  • Describe how to plot the magnetic field pattern of a magnet using a compass
  • Draw the magnetic field pattern of a bar magnet showing how strength and direction change from one point to another
  • Explain how the behaviour of a magnetic compass is related to evidence that the core of the Earth must be magnetic
  • Describe how the magnetic effect of a current can be demonstrated
  • Explain how the effect of an alternating current in one coil in inducing a current in another is used in transformers

 

  1. Space Physics 

 

GCSE physics syllabus topics included are:

 

  • The expanding universe
  • The life cycle of a star
  • The Solar System

 

Those studying this topic are expected to learn about the important elements in our Solar System, such as the Sun, the planets, the moons, the dwarf planets, asteroids and comets. The GCSE physics syllabus states that you should be able to:

 

  • Describe the life cycle of a star
  • Describe the similarities and distinctions between the planets, their moons, and artificial satellites
  • How scientists are able to use observations to arrive at theories such as the Big Bang theory

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we publish GCSE physics practice tests that cover all eight topics in the syllabus. Our packs also provide sample questions for each of the four question types in the exam.

 

As you continue to use practice tests throughout your studying, you’ll start to see your scores improve, which can help boost your confidence. As such, they’re a great way for charting your progress in the lead up to the exam.

 

When we created our GCSE packs, we thoroughly analysed examiners’ reports from previous years to ensure that we covered all the essential elements of the physics exam. Our physics packs also include some of the most challenging questions that you’re likely to come up against in the exam, so you’ll be prepared for every eventuality.

 

When taken under timed conditions, our packs can help you get used to answering questions quickly and under pressure, thus improving your time management skills.

 

All of our GCSE packs are written and developed by former GCSE physics examiners and markers. They focus on the key skills that you’ll need to do well in higher tier GCSE exams.

 

We’d highly recommend the following resources to help with your GCSE physics revision:

 

GCSE Physics: Key Skills

 

All of our packs are available immediately after download.

 

Image sources:

https://flickr.com/photos/tinybubble/8518756728

 

Related posts:

How to Pass GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Test Format

How to Study for GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Revision

GCSE Physics Topics: What You Need to Know for the Exam

GCSE Physics Help: Preparing for the Exam

How to Revise and Practice for GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Energy Questions and Answers

GCSE Physics: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

GCSE Physics: Working Scientifically

GCSE Physics: Understanding Exam Command Words

 

 

GCSE Chemistry Preparation

Preparing for the GCSE chemistry exam can seem a little daunting at first, given that the subject covers a number of different topics. After working your way through the syllabus for the last two years, chances are you will have generated folders full of coursework — so where do you start with your exam preparation? At Exam Papers Plus, we publish tried and tested GCSE chemistry revision packs, so we know what works when preparing for the exam.

 

Understand the Exam Format 

 

Before you begin your focused revision, it’s well worth looking at how the GCSE chemistry exam is structured. It covers ten topic areas over two test papers:

 

  1. Atomic structure and the periodic table
  2. Bonding, structure, and the properties of matter
  3. Quantitative chemistry
  4. Chemical changes
  5. Energy changes
  6. The rate and extent of chemical change
  7. Organic chemistry
  8. Chemical analysis
  9. Chemistry of the atmosphere
  10. Using resources

 

In the first test paper, you’ll be asked questions on the first five topics, i.e. atomic structure and the periodic table; bonding, structure, and the properties of matter; quantitative chemistry, chemical changes and energy changes. This written test lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

 

The second test paper focuses on the remaining five topics: the rate and extent of chemical change; organic chemistry; chemical analysis, chemistry of the atmosphere and using resources. This written test also lasts for 1 hour and 45 minutes.

 

Each test contributes to 50% of your overall chemistry score.

 

There are four question types in the papers: multiple-choice, structured, closed short answer and open response. You’ll be asked a combination of these throughout the test.

 

To learn more about the GCSE chemistry exam format, please refer to our article GCSE Chemistry Test Format: What to Expect on the Day.

 

Follow a Revision Planner 

Photo of a revision planner

 

We cannot overstate just how important a revision planner is to your GCSE chemistry preparation. Without one, you are likely to miss key topic areas and waste valuable study time due to disorganisation.

 

It’s worth having a physical wall planner, rather than an online timetable, as you can stick a planner up in your revision room and refer to it regularly. When you have completed a revision session or covered a specific topic, simply tick it off on the planner. A focused timetable also gives you an excellent visual aid for counting down to the exam itself.

 

Organise Your Class Notes

 

Two years’ worth of chemistry classes create a lot of notes. To help with your GCSE exam preparation, it is worth creating a new folder specifically for exam revision. Read through your coursework and pull out any notes that refer to the ten exam topics.

 

Rearrange them in your new folder, so that you have everything you’ll need for the exam in one place. This way, you’ll only have the notes you need and you’ll know exactly where to find them during study periods.

 

For more advice on how to organise your study notes, watch this video from student Lucrezia Chloe:

 

 

 

Create an Equations and Formulae Sheet

 

Having an equations sheet is an essential part of your GCSE chemistry exam preparation. It will help you to memorise reactivity series and ionic charges and help you recall each equation by visualising the sheet.

 

A proven way to format your equations sheet is to devise an acronym with the first letter of each metal; that way you can easily recall the ones you’ll need in the exam. When it comes to learning the different formulae for ions, it helps to write them all down on flashcards as well as having them displayed on a single sheet. You can then use the flashcards to test your memory.

 

Practice Makes Perfect

 

One of the best things you can do when preparing for the GCSE chemistry exam is to take as many practice papers as possible. They’re an essential tool for revision. Getting used to the papers will help you to understand the way the subject is structured.

 

Practice papers will help you get familiar with the:

 

  • Exam format
  • Question style
  • Time pressure

 

Practice papers are also a great way to notice any gaps in your chemistry knowledge. So, if you get stuck on a particular question, you can make sure to revise that topic thoroughly. You can use the papers to practice demonstrating what you actually know.

 

We recommend the following resources to help with your GCSE chemistry preparation:

 

GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills 

 

Our GCSE packs are written and developed by former GCSE physics examiners and markers. They focus on the key skills that you’ll need to do well in higher tier GCSE exams.

 

However you choose to prepare for your GCSE chemistry exam, make sure you give yourself plenty of time. This will not only save you from unnecessary stress, it will also give you the best chance of achieving your highest possible grade.

 

Image sources:

https://flickr.com/photos/ladylong/8385935842

https://flickr.com/photos/abc/37178376170

 

Related posts:

How to Pass GCSE Chemistry

How to Study GCSE Chemistry

How to Revise and Practice for the GCSE Chemistry Exam

GCSE Chemistry Test Format: What to Expect on the Day

GCSE Chemistry Games to Help with Your Revision

GCSE Physics Revision Games

Who said that physics revision had to be boring? At Exam Papers Plus, we believe that a little fun enhances the learning experience. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of our favourite GCSE physics revision games to help keep you motivated when studying gets tough. These games only need minimal equipment and contain a mix of solo and group activities.

GCSE Physics Group Quiz

 

This is a great revision game to play with your classmates. All you need is physics practice tests, sheets of paper and pens. The first step is to assign a quiz master who will be responsible for choosing the questions. To keep each quiz short, you may want to choose five questions to begin with.

 

As each question is read, the players need to answer under test conditions. Once all questions have been asked, everyone needs to swap answer sheets to mark one another’s answers. The winner is the student with the most points.

 

Physics Snakes and Ladders

 

If you like board games, you’ll love this creative physics revision game. Ideally, this activity should be played with 3 or more players. You’ll need a Snakes and Ladders board, sheets of paper and practice physics questions. The first player has to close their eyes and choose a question from the practice test by pointing to a random point on the page. The closest question to their finger is the one they have to answer.

 

Their answer is then marked by another player. The number of points awarded corresponds with the number of squares they can move on the board. The winner is the player who reaches the end of the board first.

 

Beat the Clock

Photo of an hourglass

 

This simple game is great for improving your time management skills and getting you used to answering questions under pressure. You can play this game on your own or with a group of students. Using a stopwatch, give yourself a time limit to answer each question in your practice test. Higher mark questions will require around 3 minutes, whereas shorter, multiple choice questions will need around 1 minute.

 

The more you play this game, the quicker you’ll become at answering questions quickly, which can provide you with a confidence boost leading up to the exam.

 

GCSE Physics Crossword

 

This game is best played with two people. You’ll need GCSE physics practice tests, revision notes and a crossword puzzle template. You can create crossword puzzles from scratch using this website. Using a combination of the tests and your revision notes, each player has to create a crossword for the other person to complete. The questions should ideally be closed short answer questions where a one-word answer can be given.

 

Each player needs to compile their questions into clues for the other player and allow enough spaces on the crossword grid for the answer. To begin with, you may want to start with four questions each until you get the hang of creating the puzzles.

 

The winner is the one who manages to find the most answers in the puzzle.

 

Pick a Card

Photo of coloured cards

 

For this physics revision game, you’ll need some A5 card, pens and practice test papers. This activity is best played with two or more people. On each card, write down one of the eight GCSE physics topics that’s covered in the syllabus. As a reminder, the topics are:

 

  1. Energy
  2. Electricity
  3. Particle model of matter
  4. Atomic structure
  5. Forces
  6. Waves
  7. Magnetism and electromagnetism
  8. Space physics

 

With one topic written on each card, give them a shuffle. Fan them out and ask the other player to choose one from the deck. Whatever topic is written on the card they choose, they need to answer a corresponding question in the practice test. The winner is the player with the most points once all eight cards have been chosen.

 

GCSE Physics Revision Packs

 

Practice tests should be at the centre of everyone’s physics revision. Not only do they help you put theory into practice, they can help you become familiar with the different question types in the exam.

 

At Exam Papers Plus, we publish GCSE physics revision packs that cover all eight topics in the syllabus. They’re designed to give students a confidence boost in the lead up to the tests.

 

As part of the process of creating our GCSE packs, we thoroughly analysed examiners’ reports from previous years to ensure that we covered all the essential elements of the physics exam. Our physics packs also include some of the most challenging questions that you’re likely to come up against in the exam, so you’ll be prepared for every eventuality.

 

When taken under timed conditions, our packs can help you get used to answering questions quickly and under pressure, thus improving your time management skills.

 

All of our GCSE packs are written and developed by former GCSE physics examiners and markers. They focus on the key skills that you’ll need to do well in higher tier GCSE exams.

 

We’d highly recommend the following resources to help with your GCSE physics revision:

 

GCSE Physics: Key Skills

 

All of our packs are available immediately after download.

 

Related posts:

How to Pass GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Test Format

How to Study for GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Revision

GCSE Physics Topics: What You Need to Know for the Exam

GCSE Physics Help: Preparing for the Exam

How to Revise and Practice for GCSE Physics

GCSE Physics Energy Questions and Answers

GCSE Physics: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

GCSE Physics: Working Scientifically

GCSE Physics: Understanding Exam Command Words

 

 

GCSE Physics Test Format: What to Expect on the Day

Knowing what to expect on the day of your GCSE physics test will calm your nerves and enable you to perform at your best. To help you get into a positive frame of mind before exam day, we’ve put together this post to take you through the test format step-by-step.

First of all, let’s summarise the subjects that you’ll be assessed in. In GCSE physics, there are eight broad topic areas, spread out over two test papers:

1. Energy

2. Electricity

3. Particle model of matter

4. Atomic structure

5. Forces

6. Waves

7. Magnetism and electromagnetism

8. Space physics

GCSE Physics Test Paper

The first test paper covers the first four topics in the syllabus, i.e. energy, electricity, particle model of matter and atomic structure.

The test will be written (rather than taken online) and lasts for 1 hour 45 minutes. Students will either take the test at the Foundation or Higher tier. There is a total of 100 marks, which account for 50% of your overall GCSE Physics grade.

The questions will include a combination of multiple-choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

GCSE Physics Test Paper 2

The second test paper covers the last four topics in the syllabus, i.e. forces, waves, magnetism and electromagnetism and space physics.

The second test also lasts for 1 hour 45 minutes and pupils will sit the paper at either Foundation or Higher tier level. There are 100 marks in total and the paper contributes towards 50% of your overall GCSE physics grade.

Again, questions will include a combination of multiple-choice, structured, closed short answer and open response.

For more information on the GCSE physics test format, please visit the AQA website.

Our Tips for the GCSE Physics Tests

Photo of a girl studying outdoors

At Exam Papers Plus, we help students improve their physics grades with our GCSE physics practice packs, so we know a thing or two about preparing for the tests. Here are our top tips for exam day:

  • Organise what you’ll need the night before. This includes equipment like scientific calculators, pens, pencils and revision notes.
  • Read each question carefully and try to identify the question ‘type’, i.e. multiple-choice, open response as well as the topic area. This will help guide you towards the type of answer examiners are looking for.
  • Check how many points the question is worth and try to identify where they will be awarded in your answer. If you can’t identify where all points will be awarded, you may need to extend what you’ve written.
  • Revise your answer before moving on to the next question. Sometimes it can help to re-read what you’ve written while you’re still in the mindset of the topic.
  • Try to give yourself time at the end of the test to double-check your answers. Specifically, make sure you haven’t mis-read any questions, numbers, or figures.
  • Try to stay calm throughout. If you find yourself struggling to answer a question, move on to the next one and return to it later. Sometimes it’s good to maintain your flow by answering questions you know the answer to first.
  • Stay until the end. Even if you notice other students leaving early, make sure you use all the allocated time to double-check your work. Even if you feel that you’ve done well, you should always assume that you’ve missed something and try to find it.

For information on how to make the most of your physics revision, take a look at our post How to Revise and Practice for GCSE Physics.

Also, check out this video from Science with Hazel, which provides some more last-minute GCSE physics test tips:

GCSE Physics Practice Tests

In the lead up to your physics exam, it helps to put theory into practice. Revising topic content is of course very useful, but there comes a time when you need to focus on applying what you know under exam conditions. At Exam Papers Plus, we publish physics packs that allow you to measure your current attainment level.

In creating our practice tests, we thoroughly analysed reports from previous years to ensure that our GCSE physics practice questions cover all the essential areas of the exam. We’ve also included questions that pupils tend to struggle with.

All of the GCSE practice papers that we publish are written and developed by former GCSE physics examiners and markers. Not only do our practice tests help students become familiar with the format of the tests, but they can also improve time management skills when taken under exam conditions.

Each pack focuses on the key skills that students need to develop to perform well in higher tier GCSE exams and includes detailed step-by-step answers and mark schemes for every question. Each question is labelled to identify the relevant exam boards.

We’d highly recommend the following resources in preparing for the GCSE physics tests:

GCSE Physics: Key Skills

All of our GCSE packs are available immediately after download.

Image sources:

Flickr

Related posts:

GCSE Physics: Energy Questions and Answers

GCSE Physics: Understanding Exam Command Words

GCSE Physics: Working Scientifically

GCSE Physics: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

The most effective way of preparing for an exam is to use repeated practice testing – it has been proved to produce far better results in the final exam than any other recognised revision technique.

 

Past papers and exam-style questions play an essential role in this process as, not only do they test and improve recall of key ideas, they also help to build essential exam skills.

 

In this article, ‘GCSE science: exam board tips’, published by Tes (formerly the Times Educational Supplement), the head of curriculum for science at exam board AQA spoke about the importance of developing exam technique and incorporating as much practice as possible into exam preparation.

 

Our new GCSE Physics: Key Skills pack is designed to be used alongside exam board past papers to provide an excellent, comprehensive programme of exam practice and preparation.

 

GCSE Physics: Key Skills – Main Features

 

The GCSE Physics: Key Skills packis designed for students preparing for the higher tier exam papers (grades 4-9). It is suitable for use for students studying GCSE Physics as a separate science or as part of combined science course.

 

Here are just a few reasons why the pack is completely invaluable when it comes to successful exam preparation:

 

  • it is packed with over 150 exam-style practice questions

 

  • it is suitable for all exam boards – each question is labelled with the relevant exam boards, so that you can easily see which ones are relevant to you

 

  • it provides coverage of the complete GCSE specification, including topics identified as ‘Higher Tier only’, ensuring that you focus on relevant content without straying off topic

 

  • it is informed by examiners’ reports from previous years, providing crucial practice in subject areas and question types that have caused problems for students in the past

 

  • the questions are organised by topic for flexibility – you can used them for focused practice in a particular topic or pick and mix across the specification

 

  • it includes all of the main question formats that commonly appear on GCSE papers, so that you can familiarise yourself with them and be assured of no nasty surprises in the exam

 

  • individual questions allow you to practise applying your knowledge across the specification in different contexts, including unfamiliar situations (this is an essential exam skill that revision guides and revision quizzes just don’t support!)

 

  • the answers andmark scheme are student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show exactly what the examiners are looking for and how the marks are awarded, so you will understand where you went wrong and how to avoid losing marks in future.

 

Using the Pack

 

The GCSE Physics: Key Skills pack is designed to be flexible, so that it can be easily integrated into your personal revision programme.

 

However, to maximise its benefits, we highly recommend that it is used in conjunction with exam board past papers to provide short, frequent practice sessions throughout your revision period.

 

Getting Started

 

Start by working through a complete sample paper or past paper from the relevant exam board – AQAOCR (Gateway),  OCR (Twenty First Century), Edexcel and WJEC/Eduqas – and then mark your answers.

 

The results will provide a benchmark against which you can monitor your progress and will help you to prioritise your revision by identifying the topics that you know, the topics that you are uncertain about and the topics that you don’t know. Click here to learn how to do this.

 

Focused Practice

 

Schedule in some time to revise the topics that you don’t know first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check understanding. The exam-style practice questions in the GCSE Physics: Key Skills pack are perfect for this. They are organised by topic, so you can quickly and easily identify which questions to use.

 

Repeated Practice Testing

 

Once you have revised any problem areas, you should use the exam-style practice questions for frequent, short practice sessions throughout your revision period. You can just focus on one topic per session or pick and mix questions across all topics.

 

The Importance of Feedback

 

It is really important to mark your answers at the end of each session, whilst they are still fresh in your head. Don’t panic if you get a question wrong or drop some marks – look at the mark scheme and make sure you understand what the correct answer is and how the marks are allocated. If necessary, do a bit of focused revision. This process will improve your subject knowledge and ensure you don’t miss out on any marks or get similar questions wrong in the future.

 

Check Your Progress

 

At regular intervals throughout your revision period, it’s a good idea to complete a full past paper from the relevant exam board. This will help you to track your progress by comparing scores and identify any persistent problem areas.

 

Repeating this process, using the exam-style questions from the GCSE Physics: Key Skills pack and exam board past papers, will ensure understanding of the complete specification, improve recall and hone your exam skills, so that you can walk into the exam hall feeling confident and happy that you know exactly what you need to do!

 

 Click here to purchase this pack and gain immediate access.

 

GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

The most effective way of preparing for an exam is to use repeated practice testing – it has been proved to produce far better results in the final exam than any other recognised revision technique.

 

Past papers and exam-style questions play an essential role in this process as, not only do they test and improve recall of key ideas, they also help to build essential exam skills.

 

Our new GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills pack is designed to be used alongside exam board past papers to provide an excellent, comprehensive programme of exam practice and preparation.

 

GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills – Main Features

 

The GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills pack is designed for students preparing for the higher tier exam papers (grades 4–9).

 

Here are just a few reasons why the pack is completely invaluable when it comes to successful exam preparation:

 

  • it is packed with over 150 exam-style practice questions

 

  • it is suitable for all exam boards

 

  • it provides practice for both the calculator and non-calculator papers – non-calculator questions are clearly labelled

 

  • it provides coverage of the complete GCSE specification, including topics and skills identified as ‘Higher tier only’, ensuring that you focus on relevant content without straying off topic

 

  • it is informed by examiners’ reports from previous years, providing crucial practice in topics, skills and question types that have caused problems for students in the past

 

  • the questions are organised by topic for flexibility – you can used them for focused practice in a particular topic or pick and mix across the specification

 

  • it includes all of the main question formats that commonly appear on GCSE papers, so that you can familiarise yourself with them and be assured of no nasty surprises in the exam

 

  • individual questions allow you to practise applying your skills from across the specification and solving problems in a range of different contexts (this is an essential exam skill that many revision guides and revision quizzes just don’t support!)

 

  • the answers and mark scheme are student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show step-by-step working and how the marks are awarded, so you will understand where you went wrong and how to avoid losing marks in future.

 

Using the Pack

 

The GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills pack is designed to be flexible, so that it can be easily integrated into your personal revision programme.

 

However, to maximise its benefits, we highly recommend that it is used in conjunction with exam board past papers to provide short, frequent practice sessions throughout your revision period.

 

Getting Started

 

Start by working through a complete sample paper or past paper from the relevant exam board – AQAOCREdexcel and WJEC/Eduqas – and then mark your answers.

 

The results will provide a benchmark against which you can monitor your progress and will help you to prioritise your revision by identifying the topics that you know, the topics that you are uncertain about and the topics that you don’t know. Click here to learn how to do this.

 

In a recent article, ‘GCSE Maths: How to make the most of practice papers’, published by Tes (formerly the Times Educational Supplement), the head of curriculum for maths at exam board AQA spoke about the importance of using practice papers as part of exam preparation.

 

Focused Practice

 

Schedule in some time to revise the topics that you don’t know first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check skills and understanding. The exam-style practice questions in the GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills pack are perfect for this. They are organised by topic, so you can quickly and easily identify which questions to use.

 

Repeated Practice Testing

 

Once you have revised any problem areas, you should use the exam-style practice questions for frequent, short practice sessions throughout your revision period. You can just focus on one topic per session or pick and mix questions across all topics.

 

The Importance of Feedback

 

It is really important to mark your answers at the end of each session, whilst they are still fresh in your head. Don’t panic if you get a question wrong or drop some marks – look at the mark scheme and make sure you understand what the correct answer is, the method used to reach that answer, and how the marks are allocated. If necessary, do a bit of focused revision. This process will improve your subject knowledge and ensure you don’t miss out on any marks or get similar questions wrong in the future.

 

Check Your Progress

 

At regular intervals throughout your revision period, it’s a good idea to complete a full past paper from the relevant exam board. This will help you to to build your stamina, track your progress by comparing scores and identify any persistent problem areas.

 

Repeating this process, using the exam-style questions from the GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills pack and exam board past papers, will ensure understanding of the complete specification, improve recall, and hone your maths and exam skills, so that you can walk into the exam hall feeling confident and happy that you know exactly what you need to do!

 

Click here to purchase this pack and gain immediate access.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

The most effective way of preparing for an exam is to use repeated practice testing – it has been proved to produce far better results in the final exam than any other recognised revision technique.

 

Past papers and exam-style questions play an essential role in this process as, not only do they test and improve recall of key ideas, they also help to build essential exam skills.

 

In this article, ‘GCSE science: exam board tips’, published by Tes (formerly the Times Educational Supplement), the head of curriculum for science at exam board AQA spoke about the importance of developing exam technique and incorporating as much practice as possible into exam preparation.

 

Our new GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills pack is designed to be used alongside exam board past papers to provide an excellent, comprehensive programme of exam practice and preparation.

 

GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills – Main Features

 

The GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills packis designed for students preparing for the higher tier exam papers (grades 4-9). It is suitable for use for students studying GCSE Chemistry as a separate science or as part of combined science course.

 

Here are just a few reasons why the pack is completely invaluable when it comes to successful exam preparation:

 

  • it is packed with over 150 exam-style practice questions

 

  • it is suitable for all exam boards – each question is labelled with the relevant exam boards, so that you can easily see which ones are relevant to you

 

  • it provides coverage of the complete GCSE specification, including topics identified as ‘Higher Tier only’, ensuring that you focus on relevant content without straying off topic

 

  • it is informed by examiners’ reports from previous years, providing crucial practice in subject areas and question types that have caused problems for students in the past

 

  • the questions are organised by topic for flexibility – you can used them for focused practice in a particular topic or pick and mix across the specification

 

  • it includes all of the main question formats that commonly appear on GCSE papers, so that you can familiarise yourself with them and be assured of no nasty surprises in the exam

 

  • individual questions allow you to practise applying your knowledge across the specification in different contexts, including unfamiliar situations (this is an essential exam skill that revision guides and revision quizzes just don’t support!)

 

  • the answers andmark scheme are student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show exactly what the examiners are looking for and how the marks are awarded, so you will understand where you went wrong and how to avoid losing marks in future.

 

Using the Pack

 

The GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills pack is designed to be flexible, so that it can be easily integrated into your personal revision programme.

 

However, to maximise its benefits, we highly recommend that it is used in conjunction with exam board past papers to provide short, frequent practice sessions throughout your revision period.

 

Getting Started

 

Start by working through a complete sample paper or past paper from the relevant exam board – AQA,OCR (Gateway), OCR (Twenty First Century), Edexceland WJEC/Eduqas– and then mark your answers.

 

The results will provide a benchmark against which you can monitor your progress and will help you to prioritise your revision by identifying the topics that you know, the topics that you are uncertain about and the topics that you don’t know. Click here to learn how to do this.

 

Focused Practice

 

Schedule in some time to revise the topics that you don’t know first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check understanding. The exam-style practice questions in the GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills pack are perfect for this. They are organised by topic, so you can quickly and easily identify which questions to use.

 

Repeated Practice Testing

 

Once you have revised any problem areas, you should use the exam-style practice questions for frequent, short practice sessions throughout your revision period. You can just focus on one topic per session or pick and mix questions across all topics.

 

The Importance of Feedback

 

It is really important to mark your answers at the end of each session, whilst they are still fresh in your head. Don’t panic if you get a question wrong or drop some marks – look at the mark scheme and make sure you understand what the correct answer is and how the marks are allocated. If necessary, do a bit of focused revision. This process will improve your subject knowledge and ensure you don’t miss out on any marks or get similar questions wrong in the future.

 

Check Your Progress

 

At regular intervals throughout your revision period, it’s a good idea to complete a full past paper from the relevant exam board. This will help you to track your progress by comparing scores and identify any persistent problem areas.

 

Repeating this process, using the exam-style questions from the GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills Pack and exam board past papers, will ensure understanding of the complete specification, improve recall and hone your exam skills, so that you can walk into the exam hall feeling confident and happy that you know exactly what you need to do!

 

 Click here to purchase the GCSE Chemistry pack and gain immediate access.

How to revise and practise for the GCSE Chemistry exam

The GCSE Chemistry exam

 

GCSE Chemistry is assessed by an exam at the end of the course. There are no practical assessments or coursework. The exam consists of two papers, which for all the major exam boards, with the exception of Eduqas/WJEC, are equally weighted and contribute 50% each to your final mark and grade.

 

Depending on your exam board, your GCSE Chemistry specification will organise all of the skills and knowledge that are assessed by the exam into 7–12 main topics. Make sure you know the date for each exam paper and which topics it covers, as this will inform your revision plan.

 

The links below will take you to the relevant GCSE Chemistry specification:

 

Prioritise your revision

 

It’s a good idea to prioritise your Chemistry revision. Start by printing a copy of the course specification and going through the subject content line by line. Use three different colours to highlight:

  • things that you know
  • things that you are uncertain about
  • things that you don’t know.

 

Read through this article in full before you start putting together your revision plan. It goes over concepts and skills that aren’t necessarily listed in the subject content of your GCSE Chemistry specification but form a very important part of the exam.

 

Don’t worry about the things that you feel confident with – going over these again is a waste of time. Start with the things you don’t know and schedule in some time to revise these areas first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check understanding.

 

Once you have revised the problem areas, complete a set of GCSE Chemistry exam practice papers. These will test understanding across all topics and highlight any areas that need further revision, helping you to fine tune your priority list and providing a benchmark against which you can track progress.

 

Make sure you understand the key ideas

 

All of the GCSE Chemistry specifications outline a small number of ‘key ideas’ or ‘key concepts’ that underpin much of the learning covered on the course. A good understanding of these ideas is essential as they help to explain lots of different phenomena. Go over them carefully and if you are unsure about any of them, revise them – read the relevant pages of your text book or revision guide, go over your existing notes and ask for help if necessary.

 

Re-familiarise yourself with the periodic table

 

You will be given a copy of the periodic table in the exam, but re-familiarise yourself with the layout beforehand. Be clear about:

  • which number gives the relative atomic mass for each chemical
  • which number gives the atomic (proton) number
  • the locations, names and properties of the different groups.

 

Practice writing word equations and balanced chemical equations using the periodic table for reference.

 

Learn the essential formulae and methods

 

There are certain specific calculations that you are expected to be able to carry out without being given the equation (formula) or method. You must be able to identify where these are needed and recall them quickly. The best way to cement these skills is through repeated practice.

 

Your specification includes details of all of these calculations. Use the ‘Find’ function and search for ‘calculate’ on a pdf version of the specification, make a list, and be sure to practise all of them as many times as possible.

 

Don’t overlook working scientifically!

 

‘Working Scientifically’ is a really important part of GCSE Chemistry. However, because some exam boards list these skills separately from the main subject content, many students forget to include them in their revision. Make sure you look at this part of the specification and include it in your revision and practice. If there are any concepts you are not sure about, go over them in your text book or revision guide or ask for help.

 

Practice skills that make a real difference

 

There are a few key areas where students often lose marks in the GCSE Chemistry exams. These are:

  • applying maths skills
  • understanding required practical activities
  • answering extended response questions.

 

Practising and developing these skills as part of your revision will benefit you enormously in the final exam.

 

Brush up on your maths

 

All the mathematical skills that may be assessed in the GCSE Chemistry exam are listed in the specification. They include things like being able to use ratios, fractions and percentages (e.g. to calculate Rfvalues and yields) and changing the subject of an equation.

 

Rather than revising these skills twice, be strategic – try to schedule your Maths revision ahead of your Chemistry revision, so you have already revised and practised these skills when you begin revising Chemistry. It will save time and make your Chemistry revision more efficient, as you can get straight down to practising exam-style questions that use them.

 

Get hands-on to with required or core practical work

 

There are eight required or core practical activities on the GCSE Chemistry specification. There may not be a practical assessment but, in the exam, you will be asked questions based on at least one of these activities and it is an area where lots of students lose marks because they are poorly prepared.

 

You should revise the step-by-step processes involved, but one of the best ways of revising a practical activity is by ‘doing’. Speak to your teacher to see if there will be opportunities for you to repeat these practical activities before the exam. Alternatively, look for videos that demonstrate them.

 

For each practical activity, make sure you understand:

  • the purpose of the experiment
  • what equipment is being used and why
  • what measurements are being taken and why
  • any hazards and precautions that need to be considered
  • which variables need to be controlled.

 

Many practical-based exam questions ask you to identify errors or make suggestions for improvements; you need to understand all of the things above to be able to answer such questions.

 

When you come across questions like these on practice papers, don’t give vague answers – practise giving specific and detailed answers so, for example, someone could follow the procedure you have described to carry out an experiment that would produce valid results.

 

Get to grips with command words

 

Familiarise yourself with the command words used in extended response questions and practice answering questions of this type. For example, if you are asked to ‘evaluate’ something, you should weigh up positive and negative arguments and make a final judgement. If you do not make a judgement, you cannot be awarded full marks. Don’t limit your response to the information given in the question; use your own knowledge too.

 

A list of command words can usually be downloaded from your exam board website. For example, AQA publish a complete list of Science command words.

 

Practice testing and practice papers

 

Practice testing is the best way to prepare for your GCSE Chemistry exams. It is proven to be the most effective way of developing your memory and recall ability, producing better results in the final exam than any other study or revision technique.

 

Using practice papers will allow you to practise recalling and applying all the knowledge and skills outlined in this article and provide a good measure of which areas need further revision and practice. Use practice papers at regular intervals throughout your GCSE Chemistry revision for maximum effect and to track progress.

 

Exam Papers Plus has just launched a new range of GCSE exam practice products. These consist of higher tier exam-style questions, plus answers, which have been written by subject experts and can be downloaded for use at home immediately after purchase. Each question is supported by a video that provides a worked solution to the question, plus top tips on how to tackle similar questions, avoid making common mistakes and ensure you pick up all the marks available.

 

Planning and practising for GCSE exam success

With multiple exam papers for up to 12 subjects to prepare for, just the thought of GCSE revision can be overwhelming and it’s very easy to procrastinate and put it off.

 

Start early

 

The key to taking control is to start early and get organised. The GCSE exams start in mid-May and it’s a good idea to start revising five or six months ahead of that time. Why not harness the surge of motivation that many of us feel at the start of the New Year to get a revision plan in place?

 

Use a technique that works

 

It’s important to think abouthowyou will revise, as this will influence your revision plan.

 

To be blunt, a lot of the study techniques that you may have used in the past just aren’t efficient when it comes to preparing for an exam!

 

Practice testing is proven to produce far better results in the final exam than any other technique and the most effective way of using practice testing is in short bursts that are spaced out over time.

 

Make a plan

 

A structured revision timetable makes GCSE revision much easier, but make sure that you set achievable goals.

 

Start by checking the exam information for each subject: what is the date for each paper and what does that paper cover? Mark the relevant dates at the end of your schedule and work backwards from there. The exam boards – AQA, OCR, Edexcel (Pearson) and WJEC/Eduqas– all publish exam timetables and course specifications that will help with this on their websites.

 

Rather than blocking in one subject at a time, try to schedule lots of short sessions (about 2 hours each) for each subject, spaced out over the whole revision period to allow for repeated practice testing.

 

Be strategic – starting with Maths and English revision can help to make revision of your other subjects more efficient later on. For example, revise mathematical skills such as rearranging formulae and using ratios, fractions and percentages at an early stage. This will then save you time when it comes to revising subjects that incorporate these skills, such as Chemistry and Physics. Likewise, brushing up on your English writing skills early on will help you to tackle practice questions that require longer written responses in all subjects.

 

Prioritise your revision

 

Once you’ve allocated revision slots for all your subjects, you can start prioritising the topics within each one.

 

Start by printing out a copy of the course specification and go through the subject content line by line. Use three different colours to highlight:

  • things that you know
  • things that you are uncertain about
  • things that you don’t know.

 

Don’t worry about the things that you feel confident with – going over these again is a waste of time. Start with the things you don’t know and schedule in some time to revise these areas first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check understanding.

 

Once you have revised the problem areas, start using practice papers. These will test understanding across all topics and highlight any areas that need further revision.

 

Test yourself

 

There are lots of different ways that you can test yourself. For example, quick recall questions, of the kind you find in revision apps and online quizzes, are great for testing understanding at the end of a revision session. Practice papers can then be used throughout your revision to check progress and identify any persistent problem areas.

 

Use practice papers

 

Here are just a few reasons why practice papers are completely invaluable when it comes to ‘revising’ for an exam:

  • they ensure you focus on essential content without straying off topic
  • they help to highlight areas where you need further revision and practice
  • they familiarise you with the different question types and formats used in the exams
  • the answers / mark schemes are usually student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show you what examiners are looking for to award full marks
  • individual questions require you to draw on knowledge from a range of different topics (no other resources provide solid practice in this important exam skill!)
  • you can use them to track your progress by comparing your scores
  • they will boost your confidence – you’ll feel much happier walking into the exam hall, because you’ll understand exactly what you need to do.

 

Exam Papers Plus has just launched a new range of GCSE exam practice products. These consist of higher tier exam-style questions, plus answers, which have been written by subject experts and can be downloaded for use at home immediately after purchase. Each question is supported by a video that provides a worked solution to the question, plus top tips on how to tackle similar questions, avoid making common mistakes and ensure you pick up all the marks available.

 

Planning and practising for exam success

 

Planning and practising to ensure exam success really is as simple as that:

  • take control early on
  • get organised and put a plan in place
  • use a reliable revision technique: test yourself regularly
  • use practice papers regularly to track progress and develop essential exam skills
  • nail that exam!

Rethinking GCSE exam revision

What is revision?

 

‘Revision’ is a word that gets used profusely throughout your school life, but never more so than in Years 10 and 11 when your GCSE exams are the prime focus, and it tends to be taken for granted that you know what it means, what it involves and what it accomplishes.

 

However, taking just a short amount of time now to consider what revision does – and what it doesn’t do – can make a big difference when it comes to your actual exams.

 

Think about the end goal first – what do you want to achieve? That’s an easy one – you want to achieve the highest marks possible on each of your GCSE exam papers!

 

So, how do you make that happen? How do you ensure that when you sit down in the exam hall, turn over the paper and start to read the questions, all the relevant knowledge will spring to mind and you will be able to apply it quickly, efficiently and accurately to gain maximum marks?

 

‘Revise, revise, revise!’ I hear you cry. But what does that actually mean and to what extent will it help you in the exam?

 

The Oxford English Dictionary defines the act of revising as ‘[rereading] work done previously to improve one’s knowledge of a subject, typically to prepare for an examination.’

 

And, yes, of course that is really important. You need to read through your revision guide and  notes on a subject to make sure you understand it – subject knowledge and understanding is, without doubt, the essential starting point for being successful in any exam. However – and this is the crucial thing – revising in this way alone does notguarantee great marks.

 

We’ve all experienced that mouth-drying, stomach-plummeting moment when you turn over an exam paper and your mind goes completely blank. This is where ‘revision’ in the traditional sense falls down. It doesn’t help you to develop key exam skills, such as the rapid recall of relevant information and the ability to apply that knowledge to explain an idea or solve a problem.

 

This is where you need to rethink your revision. The key to exam success is not cramming as much traditional revision into your time as possible. In fact, that’s a poor use of your time. Instead, you need to combine a bit of traditional revision with lots and lots of practice testing.

 

Why practice testing is important

 

Practice testing produces far better results in the final exam than any other technique. There’s lots of psychological and academic research that supports this. Without getting bogged down in the neuroscience, practice testing helps because it encourages you to retrieve information from your memory. This act alters how you store the information, making it more accessible and easier to recall in the future. The more you repeat this process, the longer you are likely to retain the information and the easier it becomes to recall.

 

How to test yourself

 

There are different ways that you can test yourself. For example:

  • flashcards
  • quick recall questions of the kind you find in revision apps and online quizzes
  • test-style questions, such as those on past exam papers and practice papers.

 

Don’t forget to check your answers

 

No matter how well you think you did in a practice test, always check your answers – getting feedback is a really important part of the process!

 

Don’t worry if you get a question wrong; just do a bit of focused revision. Note the word ‘focused’ here – don’t let yourself get side-tracked! Refer back to your notes, read over the topic in your text book or revision guide, watch a relevant explanatory video… make sure you understand what the correct answer is and why. This process will improve your subject knowledge and ensure you don’t get similar questions wrong in future.

 

Practice papers are your best friend!

 

If there is just one piece of information that you take away from this article, it should be: use practice papers!

 

Here are just a few reasons why practice papers are completely invaluable when it comes to ‘revising’ for an exam:

  • they ensure you focus on essential content without straying off topic
  • they help to highlight areas where you need further revision and practice
  • they familiarise you with the different question types and formats used in the exams
  • the answers / mark schemes are usually student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show you what examiners are looking for to award full marks
  • individual questions require you to draw on knowledge from a range of different topics (no other resources provide solid practice in this important exam skill!)
  • you can use them to track your progress by comparing your scores
  • they will boost your confidence – you’ll feel much happier walking into the exam hall, because you’ll understand exactly what you need to do.

 

Exam Papers Plus has just launched a new range of GCSE exam practice products. These consist of higher tier exam-style questions, plus answers, which have been written by subject experts and can be downloaded for use at home immediately after purchase. Each question is supported by a video that provides a worked solution to the question, plus top tips on how to tackle similar questions, avoid making common mistakes and ensure you pick up all the marks available.

 

Planning for success

 

The most effective way of using practice testing is in short bursts that are spaced out over time. So, rather than blocking in one subject at a time on your revision plan, try to schedule lots of short sessions for each subject spaced out over the months running up to your exams.

 

Revise your revision!

 

So, as virtuous, satisfying and reassuring as it feels to pore over a text book or your class notes, highlighting sections, adding annotations and making further notes, this should only take up a small part of your revision time. Arm yourself with a stack of good quality practice papers and start reinforcing understanding, improving recall and developing the essential skills you need for exam success. It’s time to change your battle cry: ‘Revise, practice test, practice test!’

GCSE Biology: Key Skills Pack – Providing Essential Exam Practice and Preparation

The most effective way of preparing for an exam is to use repeated practice testing – it has been proved to produce far better results in the final exam than any other recognised revision technique.

 

Past papers and exam-style questions play an essential role in this process as, not only do they test and improve recall of key ideas, they also help to build essential exam skills.

 

In this article, ‘GCSE science: exam board tips’, published by Tes (formerly the Times Educational Supplement), the head of curriculum for science at exam board AQA spoke about the importance of developing exam technique and incorporating as much practice as possible into exam preparation.

 

Our new GCSE Biology: Key Skills pack is designed to be used alongside exam board past papers to provide an excellent, comprehensive programme of exam practice and preparation.

 

GCSE Biology: Key Skills – Main Features

 

The GCSE Biology: Key Skills packis designed for students preparing for the higher tier exam papers (grades 4-9). It is suitable for use for students studying GCSE Biology as a separate science or as part of combined science course.

 

Here are just a few reasons why the pack is completely invaluable when it comes to successful exam preparation:

 

  • it is packed with over 150 exam-style practice questions

 

  • it is suitable for all exam boards – each question is labelled with the relevant exam boards, so that you can easily see which ones are relevant to you

 

  • it provides coverage of the complete GCSE specification, including topics identified as ‘Higher Tier only’, ensuring that you focus on relevant content without straying off topic

 

  • it is informed by examiners’ reports from previous years, providing crucial practice in subject areas and question types that have caused problems for students in the past

 

  • the questions are organised by topic for flexibility – you can used them for focused practice in a particular topic or pick and mix across the specification

 

  • it includes all of the main question formats that commonly appear on GCSE papers, so that you can familiarise yourself with them and be assured of no nasty surprises in the exam

 

  • individual questions allow you to practise applying your knowledge across the specification in different contexts, including unfamiliar situations (this is an essential exam skill that revision guides and revision quizzes just don’t support!)

 

  • the answers and mark scheme are student-friendly (unlike past papers) and show exactly what the examiners are looking for and how the marks are awarded, so you will understand where you went wrong and how to avoid losing marks in future.

 

Using the Pack

 

The GCSE Biology: Key Skills pack is designed to be flexible, so that it can be easily integrated into your personal revision programme.

 

However, to maximise its benefits, we highly recommend that it is used in conjunction with exam board past papers to provide short, frequent practice sessions throughout your revision period.

 

Getting Started

 

Start by working through a complete sample paper or past paper from the relevant exam board – AQA,OCR (Gateway), OCR (Twenty First Century), Edexceland WJEC/Eduqas– and then mark your answers.

 

The results will provide a benchmark against which you can monitor your progress and will help you to prioritise your revision by identifying the topics that you know, the topics that you are uncertain about and the topics that you don’t know. Learn how to do this here.

 

Focused Practice

 

Schedule in some time to revise the topics that you don’t know first. Read through your existing notes and refer to your text book or revision guide if necessary. End each revision session with a quick test to check understanding. The exam-style practice questions in the GCSE Biology: Key Skills pack are perfect for this. They are organised by topic, so you can quickly and easily identify which questions to use.

 

Repeated Practice Testing

 

Once you have revised any problem areas, you should use the exam-style practice questions for frequent, short practice sessions throughout your revision period. You can just focus on one topic per session or pick and mix questions across all topics.

 

The Importance of Feedback

 

It is really important to mark your answers at the end of each session, whilst they are still fresh in your head. Don’t panic if you get a question wrong or drop some marks – look at the mark scheme and make sure you understand what the correct answer is and how the marks are allocated. If necessary, do a bit of focused revision. This process will improve your subject knowledge and ensure you don’t miss out on any marks or get similar questions wrong in the future.

 

Check Your Progress

 

At regular intervals throughout your revision period, it’s a good idea to complete a full past paper from the relevant exam board. This will help you to track your progress by comparing scores and identify any persistent problem areas.

 

Repeating this process, using the exam-style questions from the GCSE Biology: Key Skills pack and exam board past papers, will ensure understanding of the complete specification, improve recall and hone your exam skills, so that you can walk into the exam hall feeling confident and happy that you know exactly what you need to do!

 

Click here to purchase the GCSE Biology pack and gain immediate access.

NEW GCSE Key Skills packs now available for Maths, Physics, Chemistry and Biology

We’ve just released a new set of resources for students preparing for higher tier GCSE exams.

 

GCSE Mathematics: Key Skills

 

GCSE Biology: Key Skills


GCSE Physics: Key Skills

 

GCSE Chemistry: Key Skills

 

We worked with actual GCSE examiners to create these Key Skills packs.

 

We thoroughly analysed examiner reports from previous years to identify:

 

i) the questions/topics that come up the most often

ii) the questions/topics that students struggle with the most

 

Based on this, we created a set of questions that focus on these areas specifically. These packs provide a targeted and efficient path to preparing for GCSE exams.

 

The packs are designed for students preparing for the Higher Tier (Grades 4-9).

 

Each pack comes with detailed step-by-step solutions for every question and a mark scheme created by expert GCSE examiners.

 

Your child will therefore be able to clearly identify how marks are allocated and what is required to score highly.

 

The packs are suitable for all GCSE boards. Each question is tagged with the correct exam board so you know exactly which ones will be relevant for your child.

 

Packed full of relevant questions and solutions, these resources represent excellent value for money.

 

Click on the links below to learn more and purchase:


GCSE Maths: 149 pages

GCSE Physics: 161 pages

GCSE Chemistry: 127 pages

GCSE Biology: 111 pages

 

We hope you find these new resources beneficial. As ever, if you have any questions or queries, don’t hesitate to get in touch.